Wrist grabbing?

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by Kissthecarpet, Feb 27, 2018.

  1. donald1

    donald1 Senior Master

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    I like wrist grabs. You can break the wrist, hyperextend the arm or nonviolently restrain an attacker. (The list goes on...)
    However your average high school bully probably doesn't think about those things.
     
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  2. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I haven’t seen much, nor have I really looked with a fine toothed comb. If I come across something I’ll post it.

    In a nutshell, it’s kind of like the video Jow Ga Wolf posted. When they’re head to head, wrestlers like to grab wrists, especially if you have a less experienced opponent. A few of the schools we wrestled liked to use a wrist grab, and get a standing single leg while holding the wrist. Think of it as pulling downward fast and hard to the opponent’s knee to off-balance while grabbing the knee. Other schools would use wrist control to tie up both arms to initiate a throw. More like forearm control, but it started at the wrists.

    Picture what they were doing in the video - the quick grabbing, circular movement, staying low, etc, and add keeping the wrist and doing what I mentioned. Someone who’s not used to keeping their wrists from being grabbed and breaking the grabs before they’re a threat will be in trouble before they realize what’s going on.

    Again, video would make it very clear. I’ll try looking again :)
     
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  3. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    A wrist grab is also a precursor to a back take.

    If you take their back and you have half a clue. You have probably won that fight.

    I do a lot of one hand on the back of their head one hand on the wrist.
     
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  4. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Here is a short clip to use wrist grab to achieve arm tucking.

     
  5. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Wrist grab defenses are useful for beginning to learn basics. In the Hapkido I studied, we pretty much went as above. And don't forget that in past times, if an opponent had a sword and you didn't, you might want to grab his wrist to prevent him from drawing his weapon, and giving you an opportunity to employ another technique against him.

    But grappling imho, needs to have a progression from the simpler to the more complicated. Along the way you begin to develop muscle memory and tactile memory to aid in future techniques.
     
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  6. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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  7. Mountie

    Mountie Yellow Belt

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    I've been wondering about this myself. Intellectually, I think of someone grabbing a woman's arm and hauling her away or trying to stop a smaller opponent from punching by grabbing their wrists, but in all my experience I've never seen it.

    I wonder how much if it is related to aikido/ju jitsu being about weapon defense so they grabbed wrists. Unarmed practitioners got used to opponents grabbing their wrists so they started defending against that. But now we train primarily for unarmed opponents so the game changed. Blocks are tighter to defend against punches and kicks instead of knives and swords.

    But that's just theory and guesswork. Anyone been grabbed by the wrist in an actual street fight or attack? Or even heard of it happening?
     
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  8. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    That’s it right there. The first minute or so especially.

    @hoshin1600 if you watch Drop Bear’s video, you’ll see him grabbing the wrist and pulling it down with him during the first minute or so. The wrist practically touches the opponent’s knee. We’d do a single leg grab at the point; either staying on our feet or going to our knees. Whichever one used would be a preference thing, but the wrist grab and pulling off-balance and/or set up the opponent nicely when done right. It’s got to be hard and fast.

    Getting out of the grab easily negates a lot of that. And many people will get a solid grip on the wrist and hold it. Some people look for a two-on-one wrist grab. Some people like to get the wrist and keep it to either do an arm drag or tie up the arm for a throw. Whatever they’re looking to do with it, if you can’t get the wrist free quickly, you’re pretty much at their mercy if they know what they’re doing. A lot of stuff starts with a wrist grab in standing wrestling.
     
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  9. Isaiah90

    Isaiah90 Orange Belt

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    They're pretty useless. In most cases, people strike. Grabbing or pushing is more of an aggressive display. People don't actually mean to hurt you when they grab you although it could be an indicator of an attack. That's why it's pretty useless to train with such methods.
     
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  10. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    The reason that someone grabs your arm because he want to guide your arm away from his moving path. When he moves in, your arm won't be in the way.

    If your opponent doesn't have similar plan like this, I then agree it's useless move.

     
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  11. MI_martialist

    MI_martialist Brown Belt

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    Wrist grabs are like the alphabet that lead to words, sentences, paragraphs, essays, books, novels, tomes, encyclopedias.
     
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  12. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    The issue is how will you grab on your opponent's wrist.

    1. Right hand grab on your opponent's right arm? or
    2. Right hand grab on your opponent's left arm?

    When you grab, do you have your "tiger mouth" (space between thumb and index finger) facing to

    - yourself? or
    - your opponent?
     
  13. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

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    Rubbish.

    I've seen plenty of instances where a push/shove is a prelude to a strike.

    I've also seen plenty where a grab (including but not exclusive to the wrist) is used to set up a strike, or to be the control technique in itself.

    In fact, there was recently shown on the localish news CCTV footage of an assailant grabbing someone's wrist, manipulating their arm behind their back for control, reaching into their pocket and removing their wallet, then pushing them face first into a wall before walking away.


    Yeah, pointless to train how to deal with a push or grab :rolleyes:
     
  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    In a review of knife attacks, 71% of the attacks started with an off-side hand attack prior to the strong-side knife. Those included grips. Do you prefer to defend against a knife while he is controlling your other arm, or after you've freed it?
     
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  15. frank raud

    frank raud Master Black Belt

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    Yes, the possibility of fouling someone's draw of a weapon is pretty useless. The possibility of someone grabbing you to hang on to either punch or stab you never happens. I mean look at hockey fights or prison stabbings. Where I live, hockey is the most common sport. Guess how most people(not trained in the martial arts) fight?
     
  16. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

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    Hang on, I thought most people shot at you from a moving car while stabbing you with a knife attached to a baseball bat with a length of pipe in their other hand?

    Edit: I forgot that everything should be dipped in acid or other chemical so they can throw that at you.

    With a hammer.
     
  17. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    At first, I tend to agree. Then... it may happen in different contexts. Like between people that know each other, indoors, and one is trying to show his dominant power to the other.

    Other scenario (or an exemple), ‘bullies’ have grabbed my stuff and closed the hand (and smiled a lot). Then I got my stuff back using about the same skill needed to manipulate grabs. At schools I couldn’t punch (without being suspended) and, as joints manipulation (and other tricks) were not making them angry, pain compliance worked all the time. With ‘peace’.

    My main issue with “grab my wrist” techniques is that most of them will lead to an escalation of violence, independently if they could release themselves at or not. Or so badly trained that there is no release at all. At the end I agree with you again, too much effort (if you want to learn the smart techniques) for little advantage. Unless you enjoy it. :)

    Training is very much for the ones that enjoy it, rather for the ones that really need it...
     
  18. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    And (some of) you say online learning doesn’t matter? I have found more knowledge in half these answers (next half later) than in many trial classes I have done or in some ‘instructors’ I have met. Sometimes reading and watching really helps. :)
     
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  19. now disabled

    now disabled Master Black Belt

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    Umm I have seen many fights in Hockey and they do grab.

    Fouling someones weapon draw goes back to the days when swords were carried (I mean primarily Japan) so some arts still contain that. I am sure that some of the striking arts will have a sword block (I don't mean the sword lol I mean the hands or the hilt ) so is that useless too? can they not be adapted and thought of in a more modern way? I'd say yes but just my opinion.

    And I have seen many instances where a person grabs another and then punches etc so saying that never happens I cannot agree with sorry

    Hockey fights are a very specific type of fight imo and well looking at all the modern data the "minders" suffer and some have died through it but hey learn to fight hockey style just remember that the other dude might kick ya in the street where he will not on the ice
     
  20. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

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    I think you missed the sarcasm in Frank's post, ND.
     
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