Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire

Discussion in 'The Hall of Remembrance (Memorials)' started by Flea, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. Flea

    Flea Beating you all over those fries!

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    Today marks the 100th anniversary of one of the worst work-related disasters in the history of the United States. A fire claimed the lives of 146 workers, most of whom died because the exits were locked as a matter of policy. The tragedy was a pivotal moment in many ways, namely for labor relations, but also for public safety.

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    On one level one could say they didn't die in vain because so many changes were made to prevent this from happening again. But we all know that sweatshops are still thriving. They've just moved into the developing world.
     
  2. Flea

    Flea Beating you all over those fries!

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    Sorry about the double post. Would one of the moderators please delete the other one? Thank you.
     
  3. SenseiMattKlein

    SenseiMattKlein White Belt

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    Gotta keep those doors locked so they can't take any smoking breaks. Well, a cigarette is what started it. What a tragedy!
     
  4. aedrasteia

    aedrasteia Purple Belt

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    Thanks Flea

    I think of this: more later.

    Doors chained shut, no exits, no sprinklers, people trapped and clawing, screaming to
    get out. Never, in 11 years, inspected for "health and safety".

    "On Sept. 3, 1991, 25 workers died from burns or suffocation and another 54 were injured when a 25-foot-long deep-fat fryer burst into flames at the Imperial Foods Products chicken-processing plant in Hamlet, N.C. As with the Triangle fire, the fire doors were locked to keep workers from stealing chickens. The plant had never been inspected -- not by OSHA or any other federal or state safety agency -- during its 11 years in operation, North Carolina accident investigators reported." Andrew Schneider AOL News

    Joel Sternfeld American, born 1944
    Imperial Food Products Plant, Hamlet, North Carolina, June 1994

    Twenty-five employees died and fifty-six were injured in a fire that swept through this chicken processing plant on September 3, 1991. Nearly all of the victims died of smoke inhalation while trying to escape through exits that were illegally blocked or padlocked. The plant had no fire alarm, no automatic sprinklers, and one fire extinguisher. Emmett J. Roe, owner of Imperial Food Products, pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter and was sentenced to almost twenty years in prison. Loretta Goodwin, a worker who survived the fire, claimed that the company kept the doors locked to prevent employees from stealing chickens.

    From the series, On This Site: Landscape in Memoriam
    Acquired from the Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University, through an Anonymous Gift, 1997.287



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    remembrance. A
     
  5. Empty Hands

    Empty Hands Senior Master

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    This is the perfect demonstration of why we should abolish unions.
     
  6. Flea

    Flea Beating you all over those fries!

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    I understand the temptation to turn this into a political conversation, but I'd far prefer to do that in the Study forum if someone wants to start it up there. I raised the issue yesterday in a spirit of honoring the involuntary sacrifices of those whose impact continues to reverberate in this country a century later.

    The Memorial forum is a place for people to pay their respects. No more and no less.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2011

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