Shooting stance

Discussion in 'General Weapons Discussion' started by Runs With Fire, May 3, 2019.

  1. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    It would have made more sense for me, too. My left eye is strongly dominant (I don't know how strongly - I'm not aware it's ever been measured) AND my eyes don't align properly (I pretty much always see two images overlaid - the word "see" in this sentence looks like it has 3 e's). When I try to sight with my right eye (with the left open) I'm just looking down the side of the gun with my left eye.
     
  2. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm a Firearms Instructor and also a Law Enforcement Firearms instructor for my departments academy. When I am running the range and people already come with training I do not try to adjust their stance but instead work on the other fundamentals such as grip, sight alignment, sight picture, trigger control, breathing and follow through. If I have someone new I will always teach them a modified isosceles or fighting stance which is identical to the power isosceles in the link. This is the defacto stance of premier shooters now a days and would be the ideal stance for anyone to learn. Like many I initially learned the Weaver stance and then modified it because like jks9199 I am right hand with left eye dominance. The fight stance/power isosceles is ideal for law enforcement and military, competitors and civilians. You have better movement ability, better peripheral vision, better recoil, etc.

    Here are some other articles to look at: The 3 shooting stances: Which one's right for you?

    The Modern or Modified Isosceles Shooting Stance - USA Carry
     
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  3. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    The shooting posture is exactly the same as the "rhino guard" posture.



     
  4. punisher73

    punisher73 Senior Master

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    I've never been able to actually track it to confirm it, but I have often been told that Jack Weaver himself told people the only reason he did what he did was because he couldn't extend both arms out due to an injury so he learned how to best compensate for that. If someone else has heard that or has a source, I'd be interested in confirming it or putting it to rest as an urban legend.

    The thing about "shooting stances" is that each one has a purpose, just like your stances in karate or other martial art. What is your goal? Are you preparing for a shooting competition to hit the bulls eye? Or, are you in LE or a soldier who is carrying multiple platforms and have to think about moving and transitioning between different weapons. How am I going to stand if my primary arm is injured and now I have to use my support side? What is my best platform if kneeling?

    Also, each instructor usually has what they like the best (either through training or vested interest to promote their product) and will sometimes preach that as "the best" method for everyone. When it comes to guns and training, everyone has an opinion and everyone thinks that their method is the best. Get good foundational/functional skills and find out what works best FOR YOU.
     
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  5. DocWard

    DocWard Blue Belt

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    If you look at what many people call a "Weaver Stance," it often bears little resemblance to the actual stance Jack Weaver used during the Leatherslap Competitions, and what he described and demonstrated in later times. Many modern shooters drop into a much deeper stance than he typically did, blading their bodies more. Weaver's right foot would often be back only slightly, and he dropped his head and tilted it slightly to align with the sights. His posture was often almost straight upright. Weaver was looking more to get quick, accurate single shots for competition, believing it was better to hit a little slower than to miss fast. Even then, he wasn't really slower.

    As for my personal stance, I can only say "it varies." I'll try not to be too confusing as I write this. I shoot rifles and shotguns right handed, and I am right eye dominant, despite being left handed. I shoot revolvers for Cowboy Action "Double Duelist" style, shooting first one with one hand, then the other with the opposite hand. Otherwise, I will shoot pistols with a two handed grip most of the time, unless I am training for something specific. Prior to taking up Cowboy Action, I shot trap competitively for years, beginning in college about the same time I was shooting rifles in the Army. I became involved in Kenpo while shooting trap, all of which means it feels natural for me to drop my right foot back into what would typically be a Kenpo Fighting Stance. This is true for all types of firearms. The exception being when shooting for Cowboy Action, where I will square up for revolvers, since I am shooting one handed, with both hands.

    When the Army began training toward the isosceles stance with pistols, to keep ballistic plates toward the threat as others have mentioned, I worked hard to shift my training in that regard with pistol and with the M4 Carbine. I still tend to drop my right foot back, although I keep my body fairly square. I also tend to put my weight forward somewhat and bend my knees. The big difference for me, is that where Jack Weaver relied on an isometric "push-pull" grip, I definitely follow the isosceles method in pushing out from the chest and allowing that to cause my grip to tighten on the firearm. This is true even though I will still leave my arms bent slightly at the elbow.
     
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  6. W.Bridges

    W.Bridges White Belt

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    i was taught to shoot weaver at an young age so when I went to the academy in 2010 it was hard for me to adjust to the neutral stance.
     
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  7. Buka

    Buka MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Man, I loved the Officer's Model. A regular 1911 is way too big for my hand. Sold all my firearms when I moved here. But good old Massachusetts, the Commonwealth did me right. They outlawed a bootload of guns - in that you could only buy a used model of certain guns, nobody could sell new ones. Every single handgun I owned was on that list, including the Officer's model.

    All the outlawed models? Their price sky rocketed. I sold everyone of them for five to ten times what I paid for them. Unbelievable.
     
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  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I miss that gun. I made the mistake of buying a ported model, and should have just picked up an un-ported barrel for it. It felt good in the hand.
     
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