Overcoming Opponent w/ Quick Legs

Discussion in 'The Competitive Edge' started by spidersam, Oct 8, 2018.

  1. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    Exactly. An awesome move, although he probably cant do it fully in his ruleset
     
  2. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I love the inside-out crescent kick. I throw it at punching range or closer. People say it’s a weak kick, I say hit a heavy bag with it until it isn’t :)

    I like it because it suits my preferred range and it’s the only kick I can hit people in the head with (unless we’re talking dwarfs, little kids, or people laying on the ground).

    My only criticism of it is it’s not easy to work into combos. I haven’t had a good technical heavy bag session in a while. I’ve got to work on combos with it on the bag, as that’s where I really get things to flow and feel natural.
     
  3. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Dojos have rules in place for good reasons. Lower ranked students aren’t allowed to catch kicks and sweep/takedown using it, and upper ranks don’t do that to lower ranks either.

    It’s a safety issue. People have twisted and busted up their knees doing that. If a student is taught it properly, and can can demonstrate they can consistently do it right and can react right when it’s done to them, then it should be allowed in free sparring. If they can’t, then it shouldn’t be allowed.

    A lot of karate dojos are on hardwood floors, making that stuff even higher risk.
     
  4. marques

    marques Master Black Belt

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    Jam. You only need the right timing. After that, you’re safe within is kicking range. (Does he punch?)

    I had a similar issue against a champion TKD guy. But once inside, he was like an average Joe; or like a shark in a forest.
     
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  5. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    The issue is to squeeze the kicking space (don't give your opponent enough space to kick) is a very important principle. It should be addressed during day one. If you have developed a bad habit that you always move back when you see a kick come in, you will never develop a good habit that you always move in when you see a kick come in.

    When your opponent kicks, he is standing on one leg. The best counter is to attack his rooting leg. In order to do that, you have to move in.

     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
  6. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    People can train moving forward into the kicking space without grabbing the leg. There are standardized drills teaching exactly that in my organization’s syllabus. They teach stepping forward (some with angling) and countering with punches, grabs, etc. They’re designed against the basic kicks - front, roundhouse, sidekick, back kick, and hook kick. They start learning those before free sparring. To be honest, some of them IMO are the best things in our syllabus.

    Teachers can add things like sweeps to them when applicable, but that’s not part of the formal syllabus.

    You can teach proper and effective movement forward and countering kicks without grabbing the leg and sweeping.
     
  7. _Simon_

    _Simon_ 2nd Black Belt

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    Yep yep, love close up crescent kicks, hard for the opponent to see them coming too!

    Loving reading the advice guys, was something I struggled with against a kicker in a tournament this year so I'm learning from this. I had my tactics but they just didn't work (shifting off to the side of the kick and using angles, I think he just flailed his arms about with back fists after his kick as he saw my movement.. or just as a standard habit)
     
  8. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Since the knee joint is weak side way, will it be better to use the hook kick instead?

    You grab your opponent's kicking leg so he cannot land that leg back down. When he stands on one leg, he will have weak balance.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018 at 2:04 PM
  9. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    I’ll agree that catching the leg is most often the best approach. But it isn’t the only approach nor the only effective approach.

    I’m assuming the hook kick you’re referring to is the same one I’m referring to - kick goes out like a side kick, then the knee is bent, thereby using your heel as the weapon. Hook kick would be better for your own knees.

    For me it takes a bit more range and the angle it’s thrown from is a bit different, but I can and mostly use it up close. It’s harder for me to throw that one at head height and it’s more telegraphed, but when I set it up right, it’s definitely effective. I try to get the back of the head with it.

    Inside-out crescent kick is a higher percentage kick for me. At the close range I throw it from, it’s harder to see coming. I’ve trained it quite a bit on the heavy bag, so it’s definitely not a weak point fighting-only kick for me.
     
  10. _Simon_

    _Simon_ 2nd Black Belt

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    Or soto mawashi geri (outside to in crescent kick) can be good in closer range, using teisoku (arch of the foot) to strike. But you have to keep a good bend in your knee a) so you can strike with teisoku, and b) so your knee joint doesn't cop too much strain. I've done it a few times in sparring, and very hard for the opponent to detect due to it being closer range.

    Just an fun thought!
     
  11. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Definitely true. I just prefer uchi mawashi geri. My hips work better that way and I telegraph it less.
     
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