Mental re-enactments

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by dosk3n, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. dosk3n

    dosk3n Green Belt

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    I was wondering how many people on here do this and what your thoughts on it are. Do you think it really helps?

    What I mean by mental re-enactment is this, supposidly there was a test where there were 2 basketball teams and they had to train for a week but one team drills, shooting etc while the other team trained in there heads just visualising shooting and getting the shot every time.

    Supposidly the out come there was little to no difference in performance so in theory both training methods worked equally.

    So how many of you do this with training?

    I can be sitting at work when its quite and will imagine that someone is going attacking me from beside me or other angles and will go through the motions of response.

    Mostly I will find my adrenaline rushing so I know Im in the right mind set.
     
  2. Drac

    Drac Sr. Grandmaster

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    No we dont do that in the dojang or in the police academy classes..Everything is physical..
     
  3. ap Oweyn

    ap Oweyn Purple Belt

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    Mental rehearsal. They talk about it a lot in the book Thinking Body, Dancing Mind. I don't practice it myself, but only because of lack of dedication. The practice makes sense to me.

    That said: It's not intended as a substitute for the physical training.
     
  4. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    I have a 45-60 min commute from my home to the hospital. I commonly practice forms, techniques and scenarios mentally during this time. It becomes almost another meditation session for me. I don't use this visualization drill only for martial arts, either. I practice SCUBA drills and review medical procedures as well.
     
  5. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    In short, lots. The ideal, of course, is training realistically with a realistic attack with serious and dedicated training partners, but for solo training at home and more, this is a great way to enhance your skills. It guarantees that you are training with the right mindset. Wholeheartedly endorsed.
     
  6. Stac3y

    Stac3y Master Black Belt

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    I do it, especially katas before tournaments, but also sparring scenarios and SD scenarios. When I showed horses competitively, I used visualization and mental rehearsal, also. I find it very helpful.
     
  7. Jade Tigress

    Jade Tigress RAWR

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    I have done this myself and found it helpful. I have heard of others doing it to a greater degree with excellent results. I agree it's not a substitute for physical training, but I do believe that mental training is extremely beneficial.
     
  8. kaizasosei

    kaizasosei Master Black Belt

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    I'm not so sure if you mean reenactments or visualization or something inbetween. But the visualization and imagination of physical skills and martial responses, is one of the greatest tools a martial artist can have to improve.

    The reenactment of experiences is probably some form of psychosis from the psychological perspective sortof like talking to yourself. But in the greater sense, it probably is some kind of instinctive magical function which most everyone will delve into in stressy situations.

    -like in one of those controversial gospels, it says something like, 'the kingdom of heaven is like someone who alone at home thinks of his great enemy and so enraged stabs his sword into the wall-then he goes out and kills the enemy.'

    j
     
  9. Jade Tigress

    Jade Tigress RAWR

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    Good distinction. I was meaning visualization in my reply. :asian:
     
  10. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

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    I recall a couple of studies where it said visualization was about 80% effective in maintaining skills as actually physically doing it. I used it alot when I had a 40 minute commute between training and my house, I would mentally rehearse whatever I learned that day. Then when I did get home I would transcribe it into the computer, forcing me to mentally rehearse it yet again, and could run through it physically several times. I found that to be highly effective.

    I recommend to all my students to write down what they learned because it forces them to visualize it.
     
  11. Draven

    Draven Green Belt

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    I do it all the time its a great way to exercise the mind along side physical activity but you need both...
     
  12. blindsage

    blindsage Master of Arts

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    Yup, do it all the time. I find it very useful.
     
  13. Shifu Steve

    Shifu Steve Green Belt

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    I do not believe you can reach your full potential as a martial artist without utilizing these skills.
     
  14. Rich Parsons

    Rich Parsons A Student of Martial Arts

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    I train both ways.

    I think it helps me.

    I cannot speak to effectiveness others.
     
  15. chaos1551

    chaos1551 Blue Belt

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    My school has a manual. We are highly encouraged to write in it and re-write the techniques in our own words, adding notes particular to our own training. This is a highly mental exercise.

    I mentally practice techniques on a regular basis. It's not like I sit in school in the lotus pose and mentally train (I think it would be better to stand up and physically practice, since physical practice involves mental process), but when I'm in a time crunch and have to leave my school right after my lesson, I make it a point to mentally practice on the drive home so I don't forget what I learned! I also run through techniques in my mind as I fall asleep at night. Undoubtedly, it helps. However, I would never substitute physical training with mental training for techniques and forms unless I was not in a viable situation to actually do the physical moves.
     
  16. Blade96

    Blade96 Senior Master

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    i do that, I did it a week or so before my grading for yellow belt was coming up. I did it the day of my grading. I did it in the few minutes before the grading. I was doing it so much that my brown belt friend came by, said hello, and frightened the crap outta me! lol. I was like 'Jesus! You tryin to gimmie a heart attack? lol'

    Guess the mental imaging worked. ;)
     
  17. Hawke

    Hawke Master Black Belt

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    I practice visualization as well.

    Running katas and techniques in my mind.

    I also play the "what if games" in my head as well.

    When I come across some bad news I run a scenario in my mind of what could have been done differently.
     
  18. dosk3n

    dosk3n Green Belt

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    Thanks for the responses. Got more than I thought I would have.

    Yeah I agree you shouldnt have one without the other and I still train 4 times a week but recently I have been wanting to train alot more, every day would be great, but finding no one else has the time at the moment to run drills or chi sau apart from the days of class so I use time I have at work running through the drills and forms in my head.

    Its been a while since I read Tao of JKD but Im sure Bruce mentioned doing something similar in there too now I come to think of it. I will have to pull the book out and re read it.
     
  19. ap Oweyn

    ap Oweyn Purple Belt

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    I'd recommend that book I mentioned in my earlier post. Because it approaches visualization as a well-developed exercise. There's nothing wrong with imagining that you're being attacked while you're sitting in the car or at work. But the visualization they discuss in the book involves setting the mental stage with relaxed breathing, a quiet place, etc. Sort of the mental equivalent of going to the dojo versus closing the car door with your foot. The latter holds some training value. But the former is likely to be more productive.


    Stuart
     
  20. Shifu Steve

    Shifu Steve Green Belt

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    Do it. I just reread it last week. It's a great reminder to be critical of what you've learned and where you're going.123
     

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