Krav Maga

Discussion in 'General Self Defense' started by Kroy, Oct 4, 2003.

  1. Kroy

    Kroy Guest

    Is there a Krav Maga section here?
     
  2. pknox

    pknox Guest

    I don't think there is a specific Krav Maga section. After doing a search on "Krav Maga", it seems most of the posts appear in either "General Self Defense" or "Western Martial Arts."
     
  3. Kroy

    Kroy Guest

    Thanks, I'll check around.
     
  4. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    If there is sufficient interest we can add one but I don't really think there is. A search will turn up many threads on it though.

    -Arnisador
    -MT Admin-
     
  5. 7starmantis

    7starmantis Grandmaster

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    Anyone here practice this system? I would be interested in hearing more about it. I don't know much of all about it, besides general stuff like its country of origin and such. What type of techniques are used? Is it focused on grappling? That type of stuff.

    7sm

    PS: if there is a thread allready posted, I appologize.
     
  6. arnisador

    arnisador Sr. Grandmaster

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    You'll find a lot of info.--search the site for krav.
     
  7. MJS

    MJS Administrator Staff Member

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    While I'm not an expert on the topic, I have trained a little in it with a friend who has trained with a KM Inst. in NY. I'll do my best to answer the questions.

    As for the techs. They are all pretty simple. Usually the same defense or method of defense is used for the same techs. For example, I gave, on another thread, an example of the 'plucking' movement that is used for chokes. The same movement is used for a choke from the front, rear and side. The idea of this is good because it really doesnt require the defender to think of what defense to do. As for the grappling, there is some, though I'm not sure if its to the extent as if you went to a BJJ school.

    The weapon techs. The knife work is something that I'm not crazy about. I've definately seen some other things that I think I'd try first. The gun defense- this has been talked about alot, but IMO, I'm pretty impressed with what they teach for a gun defense.

    Mike
     
  8. pknox

    pknox Guest

    One of the other things I've heard is that the rank tests are rather extreme in their duration and intensity. I believe at least part of the reason is to see how the practitioner operates under high levels of both physical and mental stress.
     
  9. loki09789

    loki09789 Senior Master

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    I have worked with the Krav school down the road from me off and on. THe big difference between KM and other eastern/ethnic arts, it is military based and still practiced by the military/LEO.

    It is like TKD because of the government recognition and such but the stuff in the states is different from the stuff that I saw the Korean Marines using during my active duty days. It is very sport/athletic based here. In the K. Marines, it is VERY combat based in technique and training.

    Krav, like the Korean Marine TKD is a combatives system. Unlike TKD it is a very 'simplified' art compared to other martial arts if you look only at the technique list. It is designed to speed up response time because the options menu is really short. The emphasis is on simplicity and intensity and not the "Sweet Science"/Artistry emphasis of most American practiced arts (I said MOST, don't get all defensive out there) and the testing environment is as close to real as they can reasonably simulate - everytime. I respect their testing practices and quality control. It isn't my system of choice, but I think it's good for people who really have no gut check background of fighting/contact sports...and need to know how intense a fight can really be.

    Though I don't know about the universal popularity, I would not want to be on the business end of a Krav Magan who was well trained!

    Paul Martin
     
  10. pknox

    pknox Guest

    Paul -

    I have also been told that KM places a great deal of emphasis on developing fitness. Was this also the case with the school you worked with?
     
  11. MJS

    MJS Administrator Staff Member

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    A few years ago, I attended a KM seminar in MA. It was taught be the guys from California. The warmup was, IMO, very intense.

    Mike
     
  12. loki09789

    loki09789 Senior Master

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    I didn't really find the warm ups and work out very intense, but I did only attend a few classes, and have not seen the testing first hand.

    They do offer a sparring class and a cardio kick type of conditioning class. The classes I attended were for lower level students and more technical development than fitness. I think it is the whole package that is available and the intensity goes up as the rank increases. By the way that the instructors moved, the upper ranks are pretty good.

    Paul Martin
     
  13. plumtree

    plumtree Guest

    I have studied Krav Maga for about a year. Let me tell you, it is a very effective art. No fancy moves here. Just techniques that are going to cause severe injuries.
     
  14. MJS

    MJS Administrator Staff Member

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    Yes, I agree with that! That is what drew my attention to the art in the first place. Granted, like every art, there will always be pros and cons. However, its empty hand techs. are very effective. There is nothing fancy about it...everything is simple, easy to remember and to the point!!

    Mike
     
  15. loki09789

    loki09789 Senior Master

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    Simplicity is the key. Don't take this the wrong way because I like the 'bang' factor in Krav, but it is set up as a one goal system: learn the equivalent of only the Green belt requirements of your average trad art, but be able to do it in your sleep, with full bore intensity and a high level of consistent effectiveness. As a system it makes it a 'fast track' learning curve relative to most other MA's.

    I like the systematic movement toward a clear goal. Produces more effective students. Now, once that is established is there an artistic factor to entice long term student attendance or higher level tactical theory that you might be introduced to?
     
  16. MJS

    MJS Administrator Staff Member

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    I've heard that the student body at the LA school is very good. Again, I've never traveled there, but from what I've seen, they dont seem to be hurting for students. I"m far from an expert in this art, but from what my KM inst. told me, is that once you start to progress towards the higher levels, there are more advanced things that are covered.

    I hope that this was a help!

    Mike
     
  17. pknox

    pknox Guest

    plumtree -

    Seems like you are really enjoying yourself! I just had a couple of quick questions for ya:

    1. Do you study at a K-M only school, or one that teaches K-M alongside another art?

    2. What do you think of the fitness aspects? I've heard that it can be quite challenging.

    3. It seems to me that K-M is designed to use simple (not necessarily easy, but simple, as in fewer in number and with less required physical complexity to perform) movements. After you've been in the art for a year or so, what, if anything, changes? Does K-M begin to employ more grafting (like Kenpo, for example)? Does the basic strategy change at all?
     
  18. CanuckMA

    CanuckMA Master of Arts

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    It was originally devellopped, and is still used, by the IDF.
     
  19. ob2c

    ob2c Guest

    Systems like Krav Maga have a lot going for them in their realistic training and easily learned and used techniques. I'm not against learning a "reality" based art. But I have a couple of problems with KM, at least what I've seen. First, their weapons defenses- both gun and knife defenses rely on traping the weapon hand or arm in a bent elbow. Too easily countered with a pistol, and worse with a knife, you are more likely to get a crippling cut than to effectively control the weapon. Second, they have a tendency to lean into their strikes or grabs, sometimes to the point that it appears that they are depending on the opponent to hold them up.

    Now, I'll be the first to say that I'm not well versed or even too familiar with the style, and what I saw might not be representative of the system as a whole. I'd be interested to hear if anyone has a better perspective on this system. But for what I know at this point, I would not recomend or train in KM.
     
  20. CanuckMA

    CanuckMA Master of Arts

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    The biggest problem with styles like KM is that they are developped for the military. A loy of techniques are just too brutal for a civilian confrontation.
    Also remember that there is no defense against a gun. Somebody points a gun a you, unless you are 200% certain that they will pull the trigger no matter what, you comply.123
     

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