How many times a week should a beginner train?

Discussion in 'Jujutsu / Judo' started by whitebeltforever, Feb 3, 2019.

  1. whitebeltforever

    whitebeltforever Orange Belt

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    At the moment I'm averaging 2 - 3 classes a week, and was wondering if this is enough for progress? i have other activities too but was wondering, how many times everyone trains per week?
    What is your goal in judo, and does your training routine align with your goals?
    Are you training more or less than you would like?
    What kind of progress can I expect in 1 year with regular 3 times a week training?
    I'm not too interested in grading or comps, i just really love it because it helps with mental health and physical empowerment and guides me through life's hard times... but yeah i still want to progress in skill of course.
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    As many as you want or as little as you want. Even if you train just once a week at least your out there training more than some people do
     
  3. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Three times a week of serious training is good. Gives your body time to heal and your mind time to process what you are learning.
     
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  4. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Purple Belt

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    Depending on the school and their curriculum, all things being equal, 3 times a week should allow you to get to and maintain a level of physical fitness that will allow you to focus on techniques being taught rather than catching your breath. This also depends on the emphasis on physical fitness expected in the class and the instructors particular style of teaching. Younger instructors may spend time on fitness while older instructors may spend time on techniques. Not always true but that is easily observed by taking classes with either or.

    I train in Kyokushin karate and started off going 3 times a week for 1-1/2 hours. I was probably considered an average student in terms of physical ability and technique. After a particularly tough grading, I realized I needed and wanted to be in better shape so I asked for permission to assist classes. The extra time on the floor helped me physically and I noticed that the ability to sustain 2-1/2 hours allowed me to improve at a much quicker rate. Our Shodan gradings were notoriously tough and were 5 hours long so I continued to train towards the ability to sustain this level of physical activity. When the day came for me to grade to Shodan, it not only lived up to every expectation we trained for but exceeded it. It took about 6 hours long (no breaks) and the kumite seemed to be an endless parade of opponents but we knew what we were in for and as my Shihan once said to me, 'All things have to end at some point in time, just keep training.'

    Do as many classes as you can even if it is only once a week. That is better than someone sitting on the couch but realistically, 3 times a week is a minimum to maintain a reasonable level of physical fitness and allow you to focus on the class instead of focusing on catching your breath.
     
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  5. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    no three times a week isn't a minimum, its a maximum unless your obsessive or striving fo4 high level competition, people have to have balance in their lives, otherwise ma training risks, becoming not fun any more and spoiling other aspects of your life. and I'm not at all convinced that 4 or 5 is any better than three, you need time to take in what you've learnt and recover physically,

    improvements in fitness happen when your not training, if you don't have sufficient rest, then your progress will be limited
     
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  6. Christopher Adamchek

    Christopher Adamchek Blue Belt

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    2-3 is good for most all practitioners
    I train 4-5 times a weeks and teach about 4 classes a week
    Im training about how much id like, maybe a little less than id like
    you can expect good results from consistent weekly training sessions
     
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  7. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Purple Belt

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    Hey if you can maintain a good level of physical fitness and not be focused on catching your breath by participating less than 3 times a week, more power too you. When I was in my early to mid 40's, 3 times a week was just enough for me to maintain a reasonable amount of fitness and to progress at an average rate for my school.

    I do agree we all need to find a good balance between training and normal life. We all may have different goals too.
     
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  8. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    it depends where your starting from if the classes arnt intence enomuch so that 3 hours a week isn't improving your fitness, then doing 6 hours of low intensity training won't really help much, youl just get the ability to perform at a low level for longer, which isn't much good if what you want is 5 mins of high intensity for a match, fine if your going on a hiking holiday,
    in which case a10 mins a day of high intensity training will help no end and use your low intensity classes as a rest day,

    long , hard, often. you can only pick two
     
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  9. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Purple Belt

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    HIIT is a good supplement for what I do. Adding it to my regimen gave me a super boost to cardio but I'm still not convinced I can get away with just doing HIIT. I have been speaking with people that believe that is the way to go and they are in great shape. They don't do what I do either so I keep looking for people that have used that philosophy over a span of time and over a wide group of people to see if that isn't a more efficient way to allocate training time. It could very well be but I suppose I would need to understand it more to use it in a meaningful way.
     
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  10. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    people make claims for hiit that are a bit wooley, but at the most obvious, if you want to operate at close to maximum for a short period of time (and you can't operate at close to max for any more than a few mins) then that how you need to train. or you don't see sprinters training the 5000 meters
     
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  11. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Purple Belt

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    Agreed, how you practice is how you perform and your practice should resemble how you WANT TO perform. In my particular case, preparing for a Shodan grading which is very much like a marathon, I needed to practice performing at a reasonable level over an extended period of time across a wide degree of disciplines within the MA.

    Training for a competition is very different. We train at a much higher intensity and in bursts to simulate the cardio and skills required within the match time limits. The training is much more repetitive and focused. Everyone can train this way as well but the results will vary on how they will progress within the given art. Will they be more physically fit ? Maybe. Will they do well in various aspects of the art ? Probably. Will they be able to sustain a reasonable level of performance over a long period of time across all the disciplines within the art ? Doubtful. From what I've seen, most of the people that train in this manner, do not excel during the Shodan grading.
     
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  12. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Everyone’s magic number is going to be different. We’ve all got different priorities. And we’ve all got different health issues. Train as often as you can without overtraining. There are signs and symptoms of overtraining. Train as often as you can without neglecting your other priorities.

    When I was in college, I trained 4-6 nights a week. Why? I was in great shape, didn’t have kids, and easily balanced school, work, and training. The stars all aligned.

    With a full time job, a wife, and daughters age 6 and 8, getting in 2 nights a week is tough. I’ve been out a few months with a back injury, and the way I’ve been running around, it’s going to be tough to get back into the 2 nights a week routine again.

    As Miyagi said, “balance, Daniel-san.”
     
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  13. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    Sounds like my shodan test when I was in a Kyokushin offshoot. 6 hours, no break. We ended with a 20 man kumite. We wore sparring gear for that (hands, feet and helmet), but I think it would’ve been easier without it. We somehow hit much harder with it on.
     
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  14. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Purple Belt

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    Yes, we did 20 rounds of 1-1/2 minutes and no gear. I think you are right about wearing gear though. When people see you with gear they feel as if they can go harder. They find out pretty quickly that even after a long grading, if you prepared for it, there is still enough juice in the tank to hit back ;). Also at some point in time the shoe will be on the other foot and people at the dojo have long memories ;).
     
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  15. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I haven't caught up on all the posts, so I'm probably repeating some thoughts.

    Most students in MA train twice a week, in my experience, and that's probably the minimum for making steady progress. Less frequent training than that, and you spend a lot of time trying to remember what you did a week ago.

    Starting out, train what your body reasonably allows. Being a little sore is okay, so long as it's gone (or almost nearly so) by the next class. If you're sore at the start of every class, you're going to develop your fitness slower, and you're increasing the risk of pulls and such, which will really slow you down. So, for most beginners, 2-3 classes is about right.

    If you're more fit than that, you could train more. But then we get into the question of priorities. You can certainly develop over time at 2-3 classes a week. To make big jumps, you probably need some intermittent periods of more classes, but it needn't be all the time. If your personal priorities favor more classes, and that interests you, then go to more classes. But don't feel like you "should" - do it because you want to train more, not because you oughta. (Note, don't apply that logic to going to class regularly - you do that because you oughta - that's part of the discipline of regular training.)
     
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  16. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Well said. I trained 15-25 hours a week at the dojo in my late 20's/early 30's. I do not do that now.
     
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  17. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I saw a research write-up recently that suggested how we respond to exercise might be more individual than previously thought. It seems HIIT is all that and a bag of chips for some folks, and not nearly so useful for others. The same holds true to varying degrees for other types of exercise (stamina cardio, weight training, etc.).
     
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  18. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Any chance you've got a link to this, or know a name or journal I could find it under?
     
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  19. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I'll have to go back and try to find it. I rarely take actual notes of these things anymore (I used to keep a list of useful articles, until the list got too long to be useful, itself). PM me if you don't hear anything in a few days, as it probably means I lost interest and wandered off to read about Joe Pesci or something (Aziz Ansari reference).
     
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  20. JR 137

    JR 137 Senior Master

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    And when people have gloves and foot pads on, they think they can hit harder. I had the same mentality.

    What goes around definitely comes around. But it wasn’t like that during my test. They were all trying to push me right to my breaking point. There’s a fine line there between enough and too much. They didn’t cross it. They were all black belts who’d been through it themselves and knew me well enough. I did the same thing when others were coming up. That builds the family atmosphere. People taking advantage certainly doesn’t. Anyone who took advantage was dealt with accordingly by the head honcho. Didn’t happen often, but it wasn’t pretty the very few times I saw it happen.
     
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