Concrete Nouns, Abstract Nouns, and Verbs

Discussion in 'The Study' started by PhotonGuy, Nov 8, 2019 at 11:05 AM.

  1. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    Most people on this forum are no doubt familiar with some of the basic English grammar I will be discussing in this post but its always good to refresh such stuff. English obviously consists of words and the words used in the English language fall under different categories. Two of those categories are nouns and verbs.

    Now to start off with nouns, nouns are "words that function as the name of some specific thing or set of things, such as living creatures, objects, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas." To put it simply you could say that nouns are "people, places, or things." Nouns can fall into two categories, concrete and abstract. Words such as "boy," "girl," and "tree" are examples of concrete nouns. Concrete nouns are nouns that you can touch or at least observe with one or more of the five senses. Abstract nouns are non physical nouns that you can't touch or observe with the five senses. For instance, "love," "hate," and "fortitude" are examples of abstract nouns.

    Then there are verbs. Verbs are words that function as actions. For instance the words "walk," and "run," are examples of verbs.

    Now, there are some words that can be either nouns or verbs depending on how they're used. For instance, the word "building" is one such word. A "building" can be the physical structure or it can be the act of making something. Take for instance the sentence, "Elvis has left the building." In that case the word, "building" is being used as a noun. You can also have a sentence such as, "He is building a sand castle." In that case the word "building" is being used as a verb.

    There are also some instances where a noun can be either a concrete noun or an abstract noun depending on how it's used.

    Now some people are probably wondering why I've made such a post, well, Im hoping to clear up some miscommunication that sometimes occurs on this forum.
     
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  2. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    English....

    The plural of boxes is boxes, but the plural of ox is not oxes. The plural of moose is moose, goose is geese, mongoose is mongooses, mouse is mice but the plural of house is not hice. The plural of man is men but the plural of pan is not pen. If a tooth is a tooth and many are teeth, why isn't two booths a beeth?

    Because English be easy.
     
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  3. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    lol. yeah didn't clear anything up for me.
     
  4. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    1. Some words in English were created wrong.

    Shipment - Moving goods by "car".
    Cargo - Moving goods by "ship".

    2. English also have too much redundancy.

    - I did yesterday ...

    3. English also has double negative.

    - I don't know nobody ...
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019 at 5:08 PM
  5. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    lol Reminds me of "I don't disagree with you"
     
  6. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Even today, I still don't know the difference between

    - I agree with you.
    - I don't disagree with you.
    - I may agree with you today. But I preserve my right to disagree with you in the future if I can find a good reason for it.

    The more that you have met with people, the more that you will like your dog. Why can't we just say what we think?

    In school I always argued with my English teacher. My English teacher told me that I should make my sentence as more detail as possible. I have always believed that I should make my sentence as simple as possible.

    In the following sentence, which one do you think is correct?

    1. Do you put your right side forward, or do you put your left side forward?
    2. Do you put your right side forward, or your left side forward?
    3. Do you put your right side forward, or left side forward?
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019 at 10:03 PM
  7. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

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    Naw. #1 is cute but not accurate.

    A shipment is just something you transport, whether on a car, truck, train, plane, or ship. The root word, ship goes back to old English, a Germanic language.
    Cargo is any freight, burden or load of stuff you have to move or carry. A car (autocar) is just a vehicle. And yes, it comes from the same root as cargo (via Spanish from Latin)).

    The real problem is that English is a mix of old Germanic tongues and Latin sourced words. And the result is inconsistency. But it all works. We're the MMA of languages! ;)
     
  8. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

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    don5 forget French, French was the official language for several hundred years, and Greek of course
     
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  9. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

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    Well yeah, ...but then what was Old and Middle French but a regional dialect of late Latin. So I just say "Latin sourced". Now as for Greek... outside of the sciences, we've borrowed far less of that. Which is why it's all Greek to me.;)
     
  10. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    There's a murder of crows, a coterie of prairie dogs, a covey of quail, a muster of storks etc, etc.

    But the bottom line is - trash in Pig Latin is ashtray.
     
  11. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    So anyway in the original post I talked about how a word can be either a noun or a verb depending on how its used. I gave the example of the word "building" how it can be either a noun or a verb depending on how it's used. To see how the word "building" can be used as either a noun or a verb see my original post.

    Now, I would like to point out how a word can be either a concrete noun or an abstract noun. As I said in the first post there are two types of nouns, concrete and abstract. Sometimes a word can be either a concrete noun or an abstract noun depending on how it's used.
     

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