Can it be done? Should it be done?

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by srztanjur, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    First of all, I want to preemptively thank anyone who can provide a little perspective on my situation from the point of view of someone who has trained in martial arts before; your advice will be invaluable.

    That being said, I am someone who has always wanted to take up a martial art. For a long time, the martial art that has seemed best suited to the type of movement that comes most naturally to me is Aikido, though lately, I've been looking at the very different style of Kendo (though, intriguingly, and unrelated to my interest in either of them, they are, I understand, both Japanese styles based on swordsmanship.) I am absolutely certain that, could I begin, I would not stop. But I do have a predicament.

    I lead a very busy lifestyle. I am a full time student, a full time worker, and I volunteer in a lab. I took into consideration the length of my classes, the length of my travel, the time it would take me to sleep, and every other conceivable borrower of my time, and it looks like, honestly, I can only put eight hours a week into training. This is not a reflection of my commitment. If I could only have more hours in my week, I would have no problem putting them toward training. But that's how it goes.

    So my question is, not only can it be done on such a limited schedule, /should/ it be done? Is that simply too little an amount of time to commit weekly to getting better? I have no problem with the long haul. I know it could be months, maybe significantly longer, given my schedule, before I even get passed the basics. So that's not my issue. But what I am curious about is if I would really benefit at all from doing that, and could I conceivably, with many years under my 'belt' (sorry, no pun intended), learn the martial art in appreciable way (not becoming a master or an expert, of course, but still something embodying kaizen)?

    I hope that this question is not worded too vaguely. My goals are kind of nebulous, in that I would be happy just to see gradual improvement, wherever that might take me. But I hope that I've kind of pinned them down into the least esoteric possible terms so that the heart of my question is clear. That all being said, thanks again to anyone who can offer me some insight into my problem.
     
  2. Martial D

    Martial D 2nd Black Belt

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    It's never too late.
     
  3. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    8 hours is plenty.
     
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  4. DaveB

    DaveB 2nd Black Belt

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    Most people struggle to put 4 hrs and do ok
     
  5. marques

    marques 2nd Black Belt

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    8 hrs? 2 or 3 hrs/wk of good training, for a few years, would be already great. Seriously.

    Giving your lifestyle, I would not commit to more than 4 hrs and I would save the other 4 hrs for resting or something else.
     
  6. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    Most of the folks I've taught or trained with studied about 5 hours a week. Give yourself the other 3 to practice movements on your own, and you'll be doing more than most. I've trained with folks who started in their 60's, and know folks who started later. Go for it and do what works for you.

    As an aside, Ueshiba's Aikido is not based on sword technique (that, as I understand it, is a notion based on mistranslating the "Daito" in "Daito-ryu", the primary basis of the art). It is heavily influenced by sword movements, because Ueshiba was a skilled swordsman, as were several of his early senior students (and Takeda was also a swordsman, so some of that influence probably dates back to Daito-ryu, though you won't see as much of the wide sword motions there). That common language (sword work) apparently led to some teaching based on sword movement, and some conversion of Daito-ryu techniques to use those sword movements.
     
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  7. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    If you don't train you'll never learn nor get good. In my experience most only train 2-3 hours weekly so your potential 8 hours a week is 5-6 hours more than most.
     
  8. JR 137

    JR 137 Master of Arts

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    Between work, my wife and kids, and other stuff that needs to get done, I can't possibly spend 8 hours a week in the dojo. Most adults that don't run a dojo can't either. I average 2-3 classes per week, as most people I train alongside do. Very few do more, and a few do less. Even during the summer (I'm a school teacher, so I have July and August off), I still struggle to get in more often.

    2-3 times a week is easily enough for you to progress, and at a normal rate. I haven't come across any personally, but I've heard of teachers who demand their students attend far more than the standard 2-3 nights a week. They have very unrealistic expectations. Unless of course their students are full-time professional fighters.

    You'll be fine. If you put forth maximum effort and are there to learn, you'll be more than fine. Get out and join a dojo. Even 1 hour a week is way more than none.
     
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  9. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Just train. Do what you feel comfortable with. Don't sacrifice so much that you begin to hate training.
     
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  10. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Senior Master

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    Martial arts is unique because part of your training you can do at home.
     
  11. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    to get the most benifit from ma you need to commit for a life time, that's a big commitment, the amount of time you commit each week is really a,secondary factor, it might limit the speed of your progress or it might not, it depends on your motor skills and how quick you pick things up.

    over committing at the start stage may well be counter productive, if it start to effect other elements of your life then you may just pack the whole thing in as to much trouble. You already in danger of not doing it at all as you can't find more than eight hours a week.

    just commit to one or at the most two classes a week, if you fall in love with it, your life will rearrange its self to give you more time, but you don't even know if you like it yet. If it only stays at that level then you will still make good progress.

    there is plenty you can do with out going near a dojo, work on your flexability fitness, co ordination, these can easily be worked in to your day with out adversly effecting your other commitments.

    go suck it and see
     
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  12. wingchun100

    wingchun100 Senior Master

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    Any training is good training. Will it take you longer to become proficient? Yes, but it will take even longer if you do ZERO hours.
     
  13. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    Thank you everyone, based on what you've all said, I'm going to start doing yoga this summer to improve my flexibility, and then, once I've proven to myself that the hours are doable, and I've improved my flexibility and strength a little, I'll take the dive.
     
  14. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    procrastination, stuff the yoga go and a,do a class or two
     
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  15. Jenna

    Jenna Senior Master

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    What age are you, did you say? and will you post some about your experience dipping in your toe of the MA pond maybe?
     
  16. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    "procrastination, stuff the yoga go and a,do a class or two"

    While I'm grateful for your advice, you don't know me that well, and, frankly, if I were one to procrastinate, I probably wouldn't have such a busy life in the first place. The yoga class is pretty much a necessity at this point. I've lost a lot of my flexibility and muscle strength over the years. It makes sense to be in maybe not /great/, but decent shape before I start anything else. Plus, like I said, it will give me an idea about how much carving out that time will really effect my ability to what I have to, and, as martial arts is far and above the bigger commitment, it makes sense to do a trial run with something that /isn't/ quite as much of a commitment, in my opinion.

    "What age are you, did you say? and will you post some about your experience dipping in your toe of the MA pond maybe?"

    I am about to be twenty-six, and, sure, I have no problem posting about my experiences
     
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  17. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    in what way have you judged that getting strengh and flexability from yoga
     
  18. jobo

    jobo Senior Master

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    in what way have you judged that gaining strengh and flexability from yoga is,superior to gaining,strengh and flexability from attending a ma,class?
     
  19. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    I'm going to give some advice against what's been said here. Don't try martial arts now. You're currently working full time, going to school full time, volunteering, and outside of sleeping/eating/all of that, you only have 8 hours TO YOURSELF each week. Use those hours for something you know you enjoy. Starting martial arts can be stressful at first (especially for someone whom, I'm guessing, arrives to be the best and overworks herself with everything), and you need to have that time to relax otherwise you'll burn out. The burn out will probably make you stop liking something you enjoy, and can be incredibly damaging to your mental health, based on my experience with clients.

    Bottom line, unless you know it's something you enjoy (and have proof, not just a feeling), don't give up your precious little relaxation time for it.
     
  20. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    "Bottom line, unless you know it's something you enjoy (and have proof, not just a feeling), don't give up your precious little relaxation time for it."

    This is a good point, but I actually already factored in eighteen hours of time for myself and socialization into my week. It works out to a day minus sleep, so I've got that covered
     

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