Can it be done? Should it be done?

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by srztanjur, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    Ok, good. The way i was reading it was that you had 8 hours to yourself, and were planning to use them all on martial arts
     
  2. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    but what you are doing is the very defintion of procrastination, doing something else instead of what you should be doing,
    I'm not being judgmental, I did it myself, having decieded to do MA I spent a long time working on my,fitness and flexability, before finally taking the plunge, to find I was the fittest beginner there by some considerable distance, as a result I missed out on many months of training. That I could have had whilst building up my fitness.
     
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  3. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    "instead of what you should be doing,"

    That is a super loaded statement. It's not that I /should/ be doing martial arts, it's that I /want/ to. The only way 'want' becomes 'should' is if you are arguing that I 'should' do what I 'want.' And what I /want/ is to do yoga first. I'm not concerned with missing a few months of training leading up to a lifelong practice. No matter how you look at it, yoga is not, in and of itself, a waste of my time, so does it matter if I do one thing I like before going into another? I don't see how.

    Procrastination implies that I'm putting something off, as if yoga is some intentional buffer between me and some other goal, but it's not. They are both things of value, and I can't do them at the same time. One, does, as it happens, however, give me an advantage going into the other, and serves as a good trial run of what it will be like if I lose that amount of time in my week. Will I be able to keep it up once I start, knowing that I have studies, and sleep, and classes, and work, and these many other consumers of my time? I'll know before even getting in.
     
  4. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    you did ask for advice?

    does yoga have value, probably , but you said you were doing it to prepare for ma, in which case it has a value between slight and non existent, you also said you had eight hours to dedicate to MA, three is more than enough, leaving you five hours to fit a bit of yoga in, should you wish to
     
  5. KenpoMaster805

    KenpoMaster805 Green Belt

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    wow 8 hours training is great
     
  6. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    "you did ask for advice?"

    Yeah, advice, which I've taken into consideration and thanked you for, and despite which I've made a decision, and then explained the basis of what I ultimately decided. There is zero chance I'm doing both together. The value of yoga for martial arts can't be zero, because, for whatever else the other aspects of yoga may be worth, it /does/ improve your flexibility and muscle strength. There is no physical activity where those aren't of benefit.

    It's one thing to give advice, and quite another to criticize a person's decision once that advice is given. Despite what you've said, that /is/ how it comes off. There is no reason for you to be so concerned over the fact that I'm not taking a martial art THIS second. Calling it procrastination is inaccurate for reasons I've given above. I took your experience into account. /You/ may have regretted getting into shape before starting training, but I assure you, there is no chance I will look back on doing yoga and think 'gee, that was a waste of time.'

    And, honestly, if you really thought I was just putting getting into the martial art off, I don't see why you would think it's right for me. Shouldn't that be a yellow, possibly even a red flag, about how long I'm going to stick with it? It's pointless for me to dive headlong into something that might not even be sustainable in my life. Eight hours is the /maximum/, and that's with some serious time budgeting. That's hoping that there's no semester where I have to study an extra hour more a night than I thought. That's assuming nothing unexpected happens each and every week. It makes much more sense to see how it works out with something like yoga, than it does to see how it works out with a martial art. Starting something to quit it is a damn shame; why do that to myself or to a future instructor who invests their time and possibly personal investment into my development? That makes no sense.

    When it comes to my situation, rushing into it isn't bold, it's unwise. And I'm telling you it's unwise, and you're not listening. That's frustrating. Again, thank you for the advice, but that's enough.
     
  7. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    yes I know what type of person you are, one that solicits view from others and then gets cross if those view differ from their decision, I have a sister like that.

    your not listening anymore, but for others who might make the same mistake. There is very little cross over between yoga and MA. yoga is based on static or very slow flexability, MA is based on dynamic fast mobility. They put completely different demands and require completely different development of your nervous system or the ability to hold you leg up in the air, is light years away from the ability to throw a powerful high kick . Dynamic rather than static stretches is what sports science recommends for athletic performance.

    Such " strengh as you get from yoga will be in your core and be endurance strengh, that's not a bad thing but it will do nothing you increase you power, that requires you to do powerful (fast) movements and very little at all for muscle development outside of your core.

    it won't help with balance, other than standing still one one leg
    cardio
    power any where
    endurance out side of you core
    co ordination
    reactions
    motor skills developing movement patterns
    jumping
    and a good few more.

    it will help with static/ slow flexability, which is the smallest part of Ma
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  8. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    "yes I know what type of person you are, one that solicits view from others and then gets cross if those view differ from their decision, I have a sister like that."

    And you're the type of person that doesn't accept that no means no ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    I'm not here to sooth your narcissistic injury. I'm not here to pander to your world view of believing that not doing something right this very second is always the same thing as procrastination. I'm not here to be an echo chamber for your cynicism. So I'll leave you with this:

    benefits of yoga for martial artists - Google Search

    If you think your views on the benefits of yoga are more accurate than the easily accessed literature that's out there, feel free to cite something other than your opinion. Because, you'll notice, if you go back to the question I asked, my question was /not/ about whether or not I should start martial arts right this very second; not about whether or not yoga is a waste of time; and not about whether or not the flexibility and muscle strength gained in yoga are beneficial to martial arts. You volunteered all of that information. It was unsolicited advice. And now that I've taken that advice into account and not done what you want, your ego's been injured. Sorry, not sorry. If you want to volunteer unasked for advice, be prepared for it to be ignored. You've more than worn out your welcome.

    Thank you for your advice, and your patronage. My mind is made up.
     
  9. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    I've long a go lost interest your well being, , your spouting tripe about yoga being a good prep fotmr ma, and I'm calling you out on it
     
  10. srztanjur

    srztanjur White Belt

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    "I've long a go lost interest your well being, , your spouting tripe about yoga being a good prep fotmr ma, and I'm calling you out on it"

    I get it. It's about having the last word. Have a good life.
     
  11. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    no that's not so
     
  12. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    Yoga is excellent for grappling arts, and I would presume for striking arts, too. Core strength is crucial. Lots of BJJ guys supplement their training with yoga.
     
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  13. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    by excellent what do you mean, specifically why are static/ slow stretches superior to dynamic,stretches for fighting?
     
  14. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    I don't recall comparing one to the other.
     
  15. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    you said it was excellent for ma, that better than very very very good. So I'm asking you for some science to back that up
     
  16. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    You actually asked for him to explain why static was better than dynamic, which he didn't claim.

    The science I've seen suggests both have their place - dynamic before the workout, and static afterwards. That's some admittedly skinny research on my part.
     
  17. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    Agreed. The yoga I practice (vinyasa flow) is more mobile than most types, so part slow dynamic, part static.
     
  18. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    Actually, it can have tremendous value, though much of it may be indirect. It builds support muscles around joints (improved my knees dramatically), helping avoid injury. The static/slow stretching helps elongate and loosen for general use. While this isn't specific to MA, it helps reduce injury and increase overall mobility, all of which supports MA training. It's also helpful in rehabbing the inevitable injuries. It's best to pair it with some development more specific to MA (including some dynamic stretching and explosive power development). In short, yoga makes a good pairing for most martial artists, though there are other ways to get the same benefits.
     
  19. jobo

    jobo Master of Arts

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    its teaches you nervous system to move your limbs slowly or not at all, its the very opposite of how to develop yourself for power generation and fast movement. all the benefits you liat can be,achieved in other ways, with out screwing up you power generation. The op was off to do months of yoga,as she thought this would develop her ma,skills, and it,clearly will not
     
  20. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    I believe I actually said there were other ways to achieve the benefits. And learning the slow movement doesn't mess up power generation. We use slow movements a lot in life, so the slow movement is more applicable to normal life than to MA, but even in MA we sometimes need slow movements, especially in grappling, where we may need to use slow power at times to overcome resistance, and use explosive power at other times (both can be applied, depending upon the situation).
     

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