Bruce Lee Rushed It

Discussion in 'JKD / Jeet Kune Do' started by PhotonGuy, Jan 11, 2019 at 5:06 PM.

  1. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    No, Bruce Lee didn't really rush it but lets just say he did learn and develop amazing knowledge and skill in the martial arts in the 32 years he had. He did put in lots of time, lots of hours per day, so you could say he learned more in less years than most people.
     
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  2. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

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    What's your point?
     
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  3. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Is his development more impressive than your average full time fighter? Say Kit Dale who was a bjj black belt in 4 years.
     
  4. frank raud

    frank raud Master Black Belt

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    Surely there is a point to this. Either he rushed it or he didn't. How about you decide what your thoughts are before you commit them to pixels?
     
  5. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Okay....so as others have said is there a point to this or is this just a Bruce Lee fanboy post?


    Personally I'm a Bruce Lee fan...the guy was in great shape and did some above average movies. But I'm also not obsessed with him and think he could beat everyone on earth like some people. He was a human being and he could be beaten like everyone else. Also there's no legit proof how well he could fight. He obviously had great skill, speed, accuracy and knowledge. But there's more to being a fighter than that. Could he take a punch? Could he carrying on fighting at his best level after getting tired, could he adapt his style If his game plan wasn't working. Could he handle a weight cut and fight well after dehydrating his body. Could he deal with the mental pressure of fighting in front of a crowd.

    Those are things pro fighters deal with. Things that he never proved. And there's no shame in that he preferred acting and teaching. There's no problem with that. Not everyone's a fighter. He didn't want to step in a ring that's his choice doesn't take away his skills but you also can't call him the best fighter ever
     
  6. Martial D

    Martial D Senior Master

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    Hmm. That's two utterly ridiculous OPs by longtime members today.

    I wonder if Bruce Lee would have learned faster or slower with 4 arms? Maybe that can be a post.
     
  7. Headhunter

    Headhunter Senior Master

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    Maybe if he hadn't died after 32 years he would've learned more damm quitter
     
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  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Probably more than the average full-time fighter, but not any more impressive than some (probably including Kit Dale).

    Back to what I think the OP's point was, we sometimes find ourselves telling people "don't rush it - take your time". But is there really anything wrong with moving fast...if you can? Should Kit Dale (or Bruce Lee) have spent more time at their beginner and intermediate level, rather than "rushing" to become more advanced? (Notice I didn't say rushing for rank, nor rushing for more advanced material.) If someone can advance their ability and knowledge faster than what's "normal", and has the desire to do so, they should charge ahead.

    The caution we usually give, though, is because most of us have seen many more people who thought they could go really fast, and just ended up missing the point of the training, never really developing any understanding or skill. (The extreme of this is the person with no experience who says they're going to go to Japan and train 8 hours a day for 2 years to master an art they just heard of.)
     
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  9. hoshin1600

    hoshin1600 Senior Master

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    My opinion is Bruce didnt rush anything. he just spent more dedicated hours to it then the average person would be willing to do and he was better then a lot of people too. you would never hear the same kind of comment about Tiger Woods. "oh i think tiger should have gone slower learning golf, he should have spent 3 years just learning mini golf before moving on the real golf, then just focus on putting for the next 10 years to make sure he really understood what he was doing"
     
  10. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that was the OP's point.
     
  11. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    What was Kit Dale's training regimen? How many hours per day and days per week did he put into his training?
     
  12. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    The point is that I don't think he rushed it but what some people consider "rushing" by their definition it would mean he did, developing all the knowledge, skill, and ability in just 32 years.
     
  13. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    Yes, sort of.
     
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  14. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Pretty much full time I think.
     
  15. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    Full time, so that would mean 8 hours a day five days a week, after all that is what your full time work load for a job is. So are you saying that's how much Kit Dale trained?
     
  16. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    We have training from 6am to about 7:30 and then 5pm to about 8:30pm.

    7am Saturday
    And guys have a running club they do Sunday.

    So about 27 hours a week.
    A good jujitsu club will offer about the same. And competitive guys will do those hours on top of their job generally.
     
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  17. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    For some, actually for lots of those competitive guys, training is their job.
     
  18. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Not that much. Fight sports generally don't pay that well.
     
  19. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    Alright, so if a person trains 27 hours a week with approximately 50 weeks in a year that would mean they would train about 1350 hours a year. They get a black belt in four years so when you multiply 1350 by four you get 5400 so it takes them about 5400 hours to get a black belt.

    Now lets say somebody else gets a black belt in ten years which is more or less the average length of time it takes to get a BJJ black belt. Lets say they train five days a week for two hours each day and from time to time they might do an extra day and/or extra hour of training. If you do the math that's about how much a person would have to train to be able to do 5400 hours in ten years.

    So, the point is this, in the first example it took a BJJ practitioner 4 years to get a black belt. In the second example it took a BJJ practitioner 10 years to get a black belt. Yes you can say in the first example the practitioner got a black belt sooner than in the second example since 4 years is obviously less than 10 years but the fact remains in both cases it took 5400 hours. Although the practitioner got the black belt sooner in the first example they didn't rush it since they spent just as much time as the practitioner in the second example, 5400 hours. Therefore the practitioner in the first example did not rush it. 5400 hours is 5400 hours whether its spread out over four years or ten years.

    Trying to get the same results of 5400 hours of training in say, just 1000 hours that's rushing it. Training for 5400 hours in four years instead of ten is not.
     
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  20. PhotonGuy

    PhotonGuy Senior Master

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    Boxing does, if you're a top champion. Back in his heyday Evander Holyfield could lose a fight and still make $40 million just for being in the fight. If he were to win he would make even more.

    But aside from that a fighter might make passive income.
     

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