Arts that teach knife and gun defense

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by skribs, Dec 29, 2019.

  1. Rat

    Rat 3rd Black Belt

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    Not fully related, i just thought while we were on the prision sewing machine (or it seems like it) the video would be intresting. Its it applied just with bare hands.
     
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  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    He was an arrogant jerk, mostly. He also thought nobody but him could counter techniques.

    And he probably did practice his strikes on inmates. That's something I'd believe of him.
     
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  3. WaterGal

    WaterGal Master of Arts

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    I actually just remembered what a prison guard I know said was the best technique to do if someone attacks you with a knife: when the bad guy shanks you, you grab the knife and hold it in the wound. Now he doesn't have the knife anymore, and you're much less likely to bleed out. That's from a guy with a number of knife scars from where prisoners have shanked him.
     
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  4. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Nasty situation. Opinions may vary.
     
  5. CB Jones

    CB Jones Senior Master

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    That sounds like a terrible idea...no wonder he has a lot of scars.

    Also keep in mind that most prison shanks don't have an edge....just a point. A knife has an edge and even inside you keeps cutting making the wound larger as you try to hold onto it and they try to pull it out.

    Also, prison guards have help from other guards.... Alone...its gonna be hard to hold onto the knife and stop the attacker at the same time.
     
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  6. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Wow.
     
  7. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    Yep, ^^^ this.
    It is a very limited group of teachers/instructors that can teach gun disarms, whether they are MA's or not.
     
  8. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    I agree that we cannot disagree with the previous list. This should be shoved down the throat of everybody, new to guns or not.

    What rings loud to me is people thinking they can learn about something they know little to nothing about. Never shot a weapon? Don't even know the feel or the weight of one? Have no clue how to mentally translate the difference in how a blue plastic gun is going to feel vs. grabbing a steel? Never hit the back of you hand on a steel barrel? Etc...????
    You clearly mentioned using a disabled weapon. We used a revolver with the cylinder modified so that a round could not be inserted and the barrel was blocked. At EVERY drill the pistol was passed down the line and approved by every person using it. Also, there were no other weapons allowed in the room or on the course at the time. We all wore the same sweat suits and it was damn near a strip search every morning and at every break.
    There are many 'identical' weapons/tools available for purchase to teach disarms that are twins to the real thing.

    My father was shot by his own handgun when it fell out of his hunting vest. One of my best friends (also LEO) had a 'throw away gun' fall out of hit sweats pocket when jogging and was shot. A dispatcher (who was required to qualify) shot his own car at the firing range when he was 'unloading' an old revolver. Two officers in my county were shot at but were not hit. One was from about 10' away, so a lot of luck there. I drew down once where I really thought I was going to have to pull the trigger. It still haunts me at times.
    Me and a few other officers did the bazooka challenge at the academy where they shoot a fragmenting 'shell' at ballistic speed at the metal plate on your vest, while you are wearing it behind a barrier. The impact was estimated to be about 1/3 of an actual .38 round. Probably the hardest I have ever had the wind knocked out of me and we each had a hellova bruise afterwards, but it is a very sobering experience. Not sure if they still do this but it should be a requirement for everyone who carries.
    I grew up around guns. We hunted for subsistence so guns were seen as more of a tool than a weapon. I have hunted, and been charged by predatory animals. How to carry your weapon and how to draw was something we were taught.
    The respect of a weapon was/is strongly placed under the common sense category.
    I have two pellet marks on my back (and my cousin has five) from a shotgun round that was fired nearly straight up. That is what I get for trespassing when frog hunting. Getting them out without our parents finding out was much worse than getting hit by them.

    Whether it is from a person's normal lifestyle growing up or hundreds of hours at/on the range, a person has to be intimate with their firearms. Afraid of them? Yes, if you are not intimate with the weapon. Respect the hell out of them? ALWAYS.

    They are exactly like your woman; take them for granted and it will get you in Big trouble.
     
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  9. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    We were always taught to watch the guy how holds the knife 'backwards' with the back of the blade against the forearm. Dangerous slashing tool.
     
  10. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

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    That's a really good idea actually.

    So, you disarm someone with enough authority to casually stand there and place their knife on the ground.

    Then you can quite rightly say "I took it easily enough last time, fancy another go? Go on, I dare you. I pity the fool that goes for that knife."

    I'd probably also make some reference to elderberries before finishing with "now go away or I shall taunt you a second time".


    A valid alternative is "I like your knife, I'm keeping it".
     
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  11. wab25

    wab25 Black Belt

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    Well... thats not very nice. I always prefer to return the knife to them... that way they get the point... hopefully, it sticks with them for a while... ;)
     
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  12. pdg

    pdg Senior Master

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    That's fine, I'm very rarely accused of being nice.
     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    I have given a knife back I have disarmed. It depends on the guy.123
     

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