300+ lbs opponents? What do I do?

Discussion in 'Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu' started by stonewall1350, Mar 25, 2017.

  1. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Oh and be really technical. You can get away with a lazy arm or hand position with a same size guy. You get a fatty and they can break the thing if you put it in the wrong spot.
     
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  2. stonewall1350

    stonewall1350 Blue Belt

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    How would you do that in BJJ?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  3. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. Tames D

    Tames D RECKLESS

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    I didn't notice that it was posted in the BJJ catagory. BJJ wasn't mentioned in the opening post, so my answer was based on what I would do in a "real fight". My bad, I should have paid more attention.
     
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  5. Langenschwert

    Langenschwert Master Black Belt

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    You gotta stay busy and never stop moving. I'm a Judoka not a BJJ guy, but smaller folks should generally stay busier. You gotta outwork the kaiju.
     
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  6. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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  7. billsmith98

    billsmith98 White Belt

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    What's the reason for the fight? If it's survival the the answer is different than if it is just sparing...

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  8. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

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    Maybe it is best we don't ask. :)
     
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  9. JP3

    JP3 Master Black Belt

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    You did realize that he's talking about doing this in a BJJ setting, right? Taking knees out is generally bad form and having a weapon introduced into the game would remove it from a BJJ match, imo.
     
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  10. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    He asked a question he did not specify it being a competition or an all out life or death fight. Both me and another person said take out the knee.
     
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  11. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    This kind of misunderstanding happens a lot and it's not a big deal, and several people proposed solutions that were not BJJ centered. At the beginning, it wasn't clear, but we know now that this guy was asking about BJJ. In BJJ, taking out a guy's knee would be impolite (to say the least). In a life and death struggle, by all means, do what you need to do.

    Exact same thing happened to me a few days ago. @Chris Parker went nuts. If you post from the "Active Topics" link, sub-forums are easy to miss. It happens.
     
  12. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    I am gumby, dammit!
     
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  13. JP3

    JP3 Master Black Belt

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    Oaktree.... the word "game" was right there, as well as being tossed and dragged around during practice. It seemed very obvious to me, if not to you, that's OK.

    What would your solution be for him if in a "match," or "sport" setting? Thanks for your dislike of the post by the way.
     
  14. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    And anyway the gracies were mad keen for kicking out knees there at one point.
     
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  15. oaktree

    oaktree Master of Arts

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    I do not know JP3 as I do not play sports. You are most welcome to the dislike post I have plenty more if you like.
     
  16. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes Senior Master

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    You're in the 250 pound range yourself? Hey, you're only giving up a 20% weight advantage. Imagine what it's like for the guys who weigh 150 and are giving up a 100% weight advantage!

    The following suggestions are based on the assumption that you are asking about a sport grappling context. They still apply to a self-defense context, but there they would be a lower priority than tactics like finding a weapon or testing how far he can chase you while hauling 300+ pounds of body weight.

    • Constantly move and fight for superior angles and positioning. If you engage a much bigger, stronger opponent from a position of equal leverage he will be able to quickly force you into a position of inferior leverage, and then the suffering really begins. Arm drags are an excellent tool. Watch highlights of Takanoyama's sumo matches to see some great positional fighting against much larger opponents.
    • Constantly fight for superior grips.
    • If you do get caught in a non-advantageous position, try to make space to disengage and reset.
    • If you go to the ground, try to play a top game as much as possible. You don't want to be underneath the man-mountain.
    • As drop bear says, you'll need to polish your technique. A pin or escape or submission which is good enough to work on someone your own size will often just not be perfect enough to work on someone who is much bigger. You need to drill all the subtle technical details until they become second nature. Good news - sparring with the big boys will expose a lot of technical flaws you didn't know you had.
     
  17. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes Senior Master

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  18. Steve

    Steve Mostly Harmless

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    If you've a little guy against a big guy, take advantages of the natural gaps that occur. This is part of polishing the technique.

    One of the advantages of being smaller is that it's easier to make yourself small. Regaining guard, for example, from under side control, is about creating space and taking advantage of the space that exists. The longer you train, the smaller amount of space you have to work with. YOu have to make yourself small.

    So, big guys will give you space. They will, unfortunately, also be squishing the life out of you while they do it. So the trick is to keep your wits about you, make yourself small and think about the gaps where you can work, rather than on the massive weight you can't move.

    Another tip, which was a kind of revelation for me in the form of an off hand comment by a black belt: it's a lot easier to move yourself than the guy on top of you. As you learn technique and work for reversals and sweeps, you will understand that you need to be underneath the big guy, or to his side. Typically, squared up and flat just isn't going to give you leverage. So, a beginner's mistake is to try and move big guy to where you need him to be. He doesn't like that, and so he says, "Oh no you don't." Much easier, if you need him to be to your side, to move yourself to his side. If you need his center of gravity high over your own, move your own center of gravity under his.
     
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  19. Tgace

    Tgace Grandmaster

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    You talking in a match or in a defense situation?
     
  20. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    Look at what someone 5'6 and <150 pounds does against you, that works. Try that. Heck, even someone who weighs 200 pounds.
     
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