You cannot learn body mechanics from a book

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I am in absolute agreement with the necessity for feedback. When I say it is possible to learn body mechanics from a video, I mean working with a training partner to emulate the video and test what is working and what isn't. You definitely can't just watch the video and have the skills magically implant themselves.

In fact, I'd go further and say that working with a (sometimes non-compliant) partner is essential for learning no matter what your source for the material is. Even if you have a teacher. You may have a great instructor, but if all he does is give you corrections while you punch the air then you will never gain the understanding that comes from working with a live body.

This is precisely our approach at Hapkido Online and thus far it has been effective for many people. Non compliant uke, quality video instruction, and close monitoring from an instructor. It works.
 

punisher73

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Ok, that makes sense. And don't think we don't redirect force also, or redirect it as well in some techniques. We don't always use hard techniques like a hard block; I am using as an easy example, and it's a basic movement in most karate styles. And it's not just black-and-white; there are loads of variations, but ONLY after one learns how to set the bloody thing. A hard block collapsing into your face? Not desirable ever. One learns to set the block correctly, using proper body mechanics, and then practices it until it becomes second nature and always works. Then one moves on (and continues to practice even the basics, of course). My point remains that (at least in my style), one does not learn to correctly set the block from a book or video. Not possible. Perhaps in your style it is, I'll grant you that possibility because I am ignorant of WC.

I agree with part of your OP. But, I would add that even when an instructor demonstrates to you how to do it, you still won't learn it correctly. Why? Because, BOTH are based on the premise that you are visually watching a person do it. It does not matter if the video is shown in multiple angles slowed down etc. It does not matter if your instructor shows you multiple angles, and slows it down etc. Why? Because as humans we ALL distort/delete information based on our own perceptual filters. When we see a motion, we automatically compare it to a similiar motion that we already know. In some cases, this motion may be very close and we "get it". Other times, the motion actually needed is different and it hinders our progress because of these prior associations.

So what is the solution? We need kinesthetic feedback from working with our instructor or a partner. We are never going to know those finer details by watching alone. We can only get those details by our instructor either physically moving us into the correct position or through using the technique against an actual attack and making the needed adjustments to make it work.

With the caveat that there are some people who have great kinesthetic awareness and can know how to properly move by watching alone.
 

jezr74

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This is precisely our approach at Hapkido Online and thus far it has been effective for many people. Non compliant uke, quality video instruction, and close monitoring from an instructor. It works.

I agree, adding feedback and training partners takes it to a new level. That is not self teaching the self teaching that the OP is alluding to which has the potential to be flawed.

I can definitely learn basics for the principles and movements from video and books, but then it begs the question if you learn a move self taught regardless of how basic it was and it is later corrected, did you learn anything at all when you interpreted the book.
 

qianfeng

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I tried to learn ten roads of tan tui from a old chinese tutorial a wile ago and i did alright since it was a beginner form and the mechanics weren't too hard it being long fist i related it to my pi gua, one inch longer one inch stronger.
 
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