What will the Martial Arts be 50 years from now?

Bruce7

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it may have opened eyes, but it doesn't seem to have made a great deal of improvement to existing arts who are stuck to the main part stuck in the 1920s or a 100 years earlier.

$ belts for money only works if you have a larger population of people who are will to pay for a belt, the popularity created by Bruce, made that a commercially viable business plan, even if it wasn't his idea or intent, very low quality ma school appeared over night in the uk, in there's many thousands to exploit culpable people who had seen I Bruce film

Good point.
I think teachers who knew Bruce Lee changed some of their methods.
My teacher taught a punch not used in TKD, that is very effective.
His Ideas on training and using what works from other MA at the time was revolutionary.
 

Buka

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There have been numerous (countless) periods of radical shift and rapid change ("change" does not always equal "development") in the expression of martial arts over the centuries.

Any time there is a cultural or technological change, it hammers smack into martial arts like the hammer of Thor.

As one, tiny, example, my friends who study the period tell me that there was a radical shift in the expression of Native American Martial Arts when the Europeans introduced steel trade goods, particularly axes and knives, to what had been essentially a stone-age culture. Want to take book on whether or not introduction of steel weapons caused a greater "evolution" of martial arts than we have seen in "the last 50 years?" And that's without considering the horse in our equation.

The introduction of Roman military tactics and the effects it had on the Greek Phalanx, is another example. Or the application of Philip of Macedon and then of Alexander the Great's military tactics. Or the effects that Hannibal's War Elephants had.

The introduction of the Mine Ball created a nearly unprecedented shift.

Various legal and cultural changes create amazing shifts in the expression of martial arts as well. The Dueling culture dramatically shifted, and with it the martial arts around it, with changes in social norms associated with the practice, an in the span of a life time.

The diligent work of the Marquess of Queensberry is often thought to be the backbone of a dramatic and fundamental shift in English boxing, both leading to its eventual decriminalization in England (yes, it was, in fact, illegal despite its popularity) and the complete and utter redaction of throws, locks, and even chokes & pressure point attacks.

Or, because I mentioned the Hammer of Thor, the Norse attacks on England and Europe caused a radical shift in the martial arts there (as well as the hiring of Norse mercenaries) because the weapons and armor, as well as the average size, of the Norsemen was very different.

The change of iron and steel making technologies which allowed better European armor to be produced changed the type of swords, spears, and bludgeons along with changing techniques, tactics, and strategies.

And what are we suggesting that the current half-century period of change is based on? The re-acceptance into society of MMA & BJJ maybe? As compared to Up And Down Fighting? Or Kosen? Or Irish Faction Fights at the fair? Or are we basing it on the introduction of Asian Martial Arts to Europeans? Barton-Wright did that back in 1899 and made such a big splash that Conan Doyle wrote it into the Sherlock Holmes mythos.

No, I contest most strongly the claim that "Martial Art's have certainly evolved more in the previous 50 years than ever before." Horseshit. It is the basest of egotism to believe that the changes we have seen are anything special. It's merely the latest round.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk

My time line is a little skewed as I consider things in my own personal time frame. In a couple of weeks it will be forty five years since earning my first Black Belt. Like everyone else, my opinions are based on personal experience of what, if any, research and experience I did and had throughout those years. And what I am particularly speaking of is the opportunities today to delve into the learning of various approaches to the arts as opposed to fifty years ago.

Your post seems to be leaning a little bit more to the history of military tactics and weapons. But I was born just six years after the Hiroshima bomb was dropped. It is my opinion that that bomb changed more about military history and danger than anything that ever came before it. And likely that will ever come after it. I know war is war and people dying horrible deaths is always going to be just that. And I know all about the realities of warfare in our own past as my dad fought trench warfare in World War 1.

But, to me, historically, anything before Little Boy and Fatman is different. They didn't just change things between the warring countries, they changed everything for everyone living on this planet.

As for the arts themselves, look at us right now. Having discussions on fighting, fighting history, warfare, Martial Arts and every single thing about them from either the comfort of our homes or while we are on the fly using a communication devices we carry in our pockets.

I could film something on my phone, send it to you in a private message on our forum, and ask, "Kirk, what's the deal behind this?"

I remember in the early seventies going into Boston's Chinatown to the biggest Martial Arts store and buying the Martial books of the time on so many different styles. They all had those one step techniques in series of still, black and white photos. You would look at them and try to figure out what was what, it was just so hard. But now? Just blows my mind.

I think back fifty years to one of my all time passions of personal entertainment, television. I think back to what was on it back then concerning fighting arts. Nothing. I think of it now, wow, blows my mind. And one might say television has nothing to do with History and I'd say "exactly."

Then I'd put on the History Channel and have a beer. And when I saw something I thought iffy, I could P.M you again and and say, Hey, Kirk, what up with this thing here, is this accurate?

I used to study fighters. A lot. Any fighters that I thought good. So, PRE VCR days,I had a home movie camera, one of those 8 millimeter film jobs. Three minute long film reels. Which was perfect for a round of boxing. I'd film Ray Leonard off of my television with that movie camera. I'd have twelve rolls of film by my side in case it went the distance. Then I'd bring the film to the development place, usually the local drug store, they would send them out, I'd pick it up ten days later or so.

Then one of the guys from dojo would borrow a projector and bring it down the dojo. We would project it on the wall and study the heck out of it.

But now? What, 30 seconds to google it?

I contest most strongly that the claim the "Martial Art's, especially learning the Martial Arts, HASN'T evolved more in the previous 50 years than ever before to be where the horeshit hits the road.
 

Bruce7

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My time line is a little skewed as I consider things in my own personal time frame. In a couple of weeks it will be forty five years since earning my first Black Belt. Like everyone else, my opinions are based on personal experience of what, if any, research and experience I did and had throughout those years. And what I am particularly speaking of is the opportunities today to delve into the learning of various approaches to the arts as opposed to fifty years ago.

Your post seems to be leaning a little bit more to the history of military tactics and weapons. But I was born just six years after the Hiroshima bomb was dropped. It is my opinion that that bomb changed more about military history and danger than anything that ever came before it. And likely that will ever come after it. I know war is war and people dying horrible deaths is always going to be just that. And I know all about the realities of warfare in our own past as my dad fought trench warfare in World War 1.

But, to me, historically, anything before Little Boy and Fatman is different. They didn't just change things between the warring countries, they changed everything for everyone living on this planet.

As for the arts themselves, look at us right now. Having discussions on fighting, fighting history, warfare, Martial Arts and every single thing about them from either the comfort of our homes or while we are on the fly using a communication devices we carry in our pockets.

I could film something on my phone, send it to you in a private message on our forum, and ask, "Kirk, what's the deal behind this?"

I remember in the early seventies going into Boston's Chinatown to the biggest Martial Arts store and buying the Martial books of the time on so many different styles. They all had those one step techniques in series of still, black and white photos. You would look at them and try to figure out what was what, it was just so hard. But now? Just blows my mind.

I think back fifty years to one of my all time passions of personal entertainment, television. I think back to what was on it back then concerning fighting arts. Nothing. I think of it now, wow, blows my mind. And one might say television has nothing to do with History and I'd say "exactly."

Then I'd put on the History Channel and have a beer. And when I saw something I thought iffy, I could P.M you again and and say, Hey, Kirk, what up with this thing here, is this accurate?

I used to study fighters. A lot. Any fighters that I thought good. So, PRE VCR days,I had a home movie camera, one of those 8 millimeter film jobs. Three minute long film reels. Which was perfect for a round of boxing. I'd film Ray Leonard off of my television with that movie camera. I'd have twelve rolls of film by my side in case it went the distance. Then I'd bring the film to the development place, usually the local drug store, they would send them out, I'd pick it up ten days later or so.

Then one of the guys from dojo would borrow a projector and bring it down the dojo. We would project it on the wall and study the heck out of it.

But now? What, 30 seconds to google it?

I contest most strongly that the claim the "Martial Art's, especially learning the Martial Arts, HASN'T evolved more in the previous 50 years than ever before to be where the horeshit hits the road.

That is so cool I never thought of using an 8 mm to film a fight on TV.
We have gone a long way, I quit using cable TV 9 years ago, just netflix, hulu, etc.
Watching a form on youtube, being able to slow to quarter speed is amazing.
 
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dvcochran

dvcochran

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IMO the best change for MA was Bruce Lee.
IMO the worse change was belts for dollars.
The future needs another Bruce Lee.
I fear there is no way to stop belts for dollars.
I feel he was in a golden era that has past and nothing like it may come around again in our lifetime. With the rate at which information is assimilated nowadays I don't see it happening again.
 
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