Tameshigiri Video Guide Part IV

Czlowiekfala

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
31
Hi,

This month's combination is little bit more advanced. Returning Water technique consist of two cuts – upward and horizontal. The key to mastering this technique is precise Kiri – Age (upward cut). The second move should come naturally without too much thinking.

As always I am looking forward to your opinions and comments!


Regards
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

MT Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
8,587
Reaction score
2,675
Location
New York
I’ve never commented on your videos because I haven’t (yet) practiced any Japanese sword arts, but I just want to say I love the videos and the comments on here to the videos
 

pgsmith

Master of Arts
Joined
Jun 1, 2005
Messages
1,589
Reaction score
480
Location
Texas
The video is very nicely done! I like the slow and stop motion, so it is easy to see what's happening.

As I've pointed out in your previous videos, you are using too much upper body and not enough center in your cuts. It's easy to critique your posture during this cut because of the direction changes and the slow and stop motion. Observe the angle of your body and shoulders in relation to the target. Your upper body is moving a lot because you're using it to power your cuts, which slows your tip speed.

For an example of what I'm pointing out, this is another video uploaded several years ago by Sang Kim sensei of the Byakkokan dojo in New York. It's much more difficult to see at full speed, but observe the way his body remains upright and his shoulders remain level throughout the cut. That's the posture you want to strive for, and the reason his cuts have the tip speed that they do.
Very cool! Keep them coming!
 
OP
Czlowiekfala

Czlowiekfala

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
31
I’ve never commented on your videos because I haven’t (yet) practiced any Japanese sword arts, but I just want to say I love the videos and the comments on here to the videos


Thanks guys! I really apperciate kind words. I enjoy reading comments to the videos as well. Since my technique is not perfect ;) there is opportunity to improve!
 
OP
Czlowiekfala

Czlowiekfala

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
31
The video is very nicely done! I like the slow and stop motion, so it is easy to see what's happening.

As I've pointed out in your previous videos, you are using too much upper body and not enough center in your cuts. It's easy to critique your posture during this cut because of the direction changes and the slow and stop motion. Observe the angle of your body and shoulders in relation to the target. Your upper body is moving a lot because you're using it to power your cuts, which slows your tip speed.

For an example of what I'm pointing out, this is another video uploaded several years ago by Sang Kim sensei of the Byakkokan dojo in New York. It's much more difficult to see at full speed, but observe the way his body remains upright and his shoulders remain level throughout the cut. That's the posture you want to strive for, and the reason his cuts have the tip speed that they do.
Very cool! Keep them coming!

Sang Kim Sensei rocks. Indeed his posture is very stable.

What I can say - I agree :) It's hard to deny something that can be observed on the video. I think style of cutting depends little bit on the school. Some schools teach that you should bend little bit forward while cutting Kesa - Kiri , other ones will tell you to not to lean too much etc.Probably there is lot of ways to cut and it is hard to tell which one is the best.

Nevertheless I rely on upper body movements too much. Is it slowing cuts a lot? It's hard to tell as well. As for this technique two cuts took (from start of Kiri -Age *upward* to succesful Mayoko - Giri *horizontal* ) less than a second.
 

Buka

Sr. Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
11,224
Reaction score
7,535
Location
Maui
Thanks guys! I really apperciate kind words. I enjoy reading comments to the videos as well. Since my technique is not perfect ;) there is opportunity to improve!

Czlowiekfala, have you ever seen the documentary Budo? I think you would love it. There's a bunch of what you do on it.


You can get it on Amazon for about ten bucks. It's way cool.
 
OP
Czlowiekfala

Czlowiekfala

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
31
Czlowiekfala, have you ever seen the documentary Budo? I think you would love it. There's a bunch of what you do on it.


You can get it on Amazon for about ten bucks. It's way cool.

I have seen it many years ago on my first summer martial art camp. Good memories :) I need to re watch it. Thanks!
 

Flying Crane

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Sep 21, 2005
Messages
13,513
Reaction score
2,940
Location
San Francisco
Czlowiekfala, have you ever seen the documentary Budo? I think you would love it. There's a bunch of what you do on it.


You can get it on Amazon for about ten bucks. It's way cool.
I haven’t watched that video in many years, but I remember that it is excellent.
 

pgsmith

Master of Arts
Joined
Jun 1, 2005
Messages
1,589
Reaction score
480
Location
Texas
Is it slowing cuts a lot? It's hard to tell as well. As for this technique two cuts took (from start of Kiri -Age *upward* to succesful Mayoko - Giri *horizontal* ) less than a second.

No, it's really not hard to tell, and it's not about how fast you can do the cuts. A good cut of a single target like that one depends mainly upon two factors, blade alignment (hasuji) and tip speed. Your hasuji is very good, but it is easy to see that your tip speed is not as good as it could be by looking at the target. There are small pieces that bent rather than cut through, leaving the target a bit ragged. These are indicators of sub-optimal tip speed (and would cost you points at tai kai). We all have things that we need to work on, else we would all lose interest.

Not trying to argue, just pointing out what I see based upon my experiences. I can avoid comment if you'd rather.
 
OP
Czlowiekfala

Czlowiekfala

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
31
No, it's really not hard to tell, and it's not about how fast you can do the cuts. A good cut of a single target like that one depends mainly upon two factors, blade alignment (hasuji) and tip speed. Your hasuji is very good, but it is easy to see that your tip speed is not as good as it could be by looking at the target. There are small pieces that bent rather than cut through, leaving the target a bit ragged. These are indicators of sub-optimal tip speed (and would cost you points at tai kai). We all have things that we need to work on, else we would all lose interest.

Not trying to argue, just pointing out what I see based upon my experiences. I can avoid comment if you'd rather.

It would be nice to perform cuts even faster :) Thanks for your comments - they are always insightful so feel free to write whatever you want :)
 

Latest Discussions

Top