Small library of misc Japanese Marial Arts related PDFs

gpseymour

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They keep longer cooled. The egg cannot continue to grow. We have raised our own all my life. I have cracked more than a few very red eggs. Not pretty.
IIRC, the ones in grocery stores aren't viable (except in a very tiny number of exceptional cases), so wouldn't grow, anyway. I forget why they aren't, or even if I actually know that or just think I do.
 

Tez3

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IIRC, the ones in grocery stores aren't viable (except in a very tiny number of exceptional cases), so wouldn't grow, anyway. I forget why they aren't, or even if I actually know that or just think I do.


Eggs have to be fertilised to grow into chicks. You have to have a rooster in with the hens which commercial egg producers don't have and I'm sure you don't need any more explanation at your age!!!
 

Tez3

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Tempted to rename this thread to include "General Egg chat" :rolleyes:
Apparently the Japanese started using eggs a long たまご
2Q.png


On topic, if anyone knows where I can find more PDFs, let me know and I can sift through and maybe build on this little project.


When a subject piques people's interest that's it plus when you wrote 'Ashida Kim' it killed that conversation stone dead, sorry.
 

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Earthworms, slugs, insects, grass, vegetables, berries, weeds, flowers ( marigolds make the yolks yellower).




Your commercial eggs are washed though meaning they have to be kept in the fridge, that's why they are illegal in the UK and the EU, we can't import them.
Earthworms and such come from being free range. One of the best things about having chickens is that we have zero ticks around our barns. The scratch is a supplement for cold weather and insurance that they are being properly fed. I will find an article on what unfertilized eggs can do on their own. Very interesting. I need to read up on the washing. I do not understand that part.
 

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Tez3

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What have I done?...
I can imagine you are confused, starting with a martial arts related item and ending with facts of life for chooks, don't worry it's all the blows to the head we've taken through the decades.

Normal service will be resumed shortly... :D
 

dvcochran

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The question was what do they eat, not what they eat when being fed by humans.



Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

Unfertilised eggs don't have the means to hatch.
Good read. The U.S. and Japan who do refrigerate are the 2nd and 4th producers globally. England is outside the top 10. China blows everyone away by a factor of about 4. They have a huge local consumer market.
I am a fan of brown eggs but I don't think there is any difference in taste. Our hens that lay brown eggs (sex links)generally lay a large or extra large egg. Yummy.
 

Tez3

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Good read. The U.S. and Japan who do refrigerate are the 2nd and 4th producers globally. England is outside the top 10. China blows everyone away by a factor of about 4. They have a huge local consumer market.
I am a fan of brown eggs but I don't think there is any difference in taste. Our hens that lay brown eggs (sex links)generally lay a large or extra large egg. Yummy.


England? We don't carry figures for just one part of the UK, the figures will be for the UK. I imagine that the UK wouldn't have as many eggs as China due to the population and size of that country.
UK Egg Industry Data | Official Egg Info
 

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England? We don't carry figures for just one part of the UK, the figures will be for the UK. I imagine that the UK wouldn't have as many eggs as China due to the population and size of that country.
UK Egg Industry Data | Official Egg Info
It would seem China must go through their eggs pretty fast. An unwashed egg has a shelf life of 21 days vs. 50 days for a washed, refrigerated egg. I gotta think the added marketability of the extra shelf life is one of the big driving factors.
I can sometimes know when eggs are unfertilized when hens prefer to stay in the coops. It is not all that uncommon to see blood spots and cloudy white in a egg that is only a few days old. Do they light test the eggs for clarity in the U.K.?
 

Tez3

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I can sometimes know when eggs are unfertilized when hens prefer to stay in the coops.


Not tonight Josephine!

We get blood spots etc in eggs, it means I have to throw them away as they aren't kosher but non kosher people don't care.

Fresh eggs are the preference here, I don't think many would keep them for three weeks, usually people buy them every week, commercial eggs have the date on them. Here we also eat a lot of other eggs such as duck, goose, quail and turkey, up in the highlands and Islands they'll eat seagull eggs too though collecting them is limited.
 

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I've always kept my eggs with the dairy.
However, since you're talking about Ashida Kim, the analogy would be more like keeping your fertilizer with the dairy.

I need to read up on the washing. I do not understand that part.
Didn't read the article so it may have explained it, but the gist is that eggs have a natural coating that seals the shell and keeps out bacteria. Washing them compromises that coating. If you wash them, you have to refrigerate them.

We don't have chickens at the moment, and I seriously miss the fresh eggs!
 

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Not tonight Josephine!

We get blood spots etc in eggs, it means I have to throw them away as they aren't kosher but non kosher people don't care.

Fresh eggs are the preference here, I don't think many would keep them for three weeks, usually people buy them every week, commercial eggs have the date on them. Here we also eat a lot of other eggs such as duck, goose, quail and turkey, up in the highlands and Islands they'll eat seagull eggs too though collecting them is limited.
I would consider any purchased eggs without blood in them and not stinking fresh. My point being I seriously doubt you can tell the difference in a 3 day old egg and a 20 day old egg, that has been refrigerated. Whether it was washed or not. Do you refrigerate your eggs when you bring them home? We don't wash our free range eggs but we do refrigerate them.
We have about a dozen ducks. The don't all lay but they make a huge egg when they do. A slightly different, gamey taste to me.
 

Tez3

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I would consider any purchased eggs without blood in them and not stinking fresh. My point being I seriously doubt you can tell the difference in a 3 day old egg and a 20 day old egg, that has been refrigerated. Whether it was washed or not. Do you refrigerate your eggs when you bring them home? We don't wash our free range eggs but we do refrigerate them.
We have about a dozen ducks. The don't all lay but they make a huge egg when they do. A slightly different, gamey taste to me.


Our purchased eggs have the date stamped on the boxes and I don't keep them in the fridge. it's not good for them to have a change of temperature from cold to warm, opens the pores and lets in bacteria. I only buy local ones anyway, always 'proper' free range.

I watched a David Attenborough programme on eggs the other day, look up Kiwis eggs, it's staggering!
 

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