Short form one....

It contains:

Blocks: Inward, outward, upward, downward

Stances: nuetral bow, cat stance, twist stance, etc- derivitives of a horse stance.

Concepts: Double factor, methods, paths, 4 angles of attack using the clock principle-12-3-6 and 9 o'clock etc.

I think the Instructor defines. The more precise the form the more the instructor has taught about it- or the more the student has been taught about using the tools of the trade. I believe only then can the form start to define.





:asian:
 
The transition from moving stance to stance with your blocks. The blocks crossing at a particular point across your centerline. Once again just my opinion.
Jason Farnsworth
 
Originally posted by Klondike93

The double factor would be the block with the back elbow?


:asian:

Sure is- as well as opposing forces.

:asian:
 
The back elbow can also be thought of as a strike... making this movement combined with the inward block as a two man attack.

The back elbow can also be thought of as a countergrab and pull against a grab and the inward block thought of as a strike against the opponents elbow for a break.

Originally posted by Klondike93

The double factor would be the block with the back elbow?


:asian:
 
I'm begining to see why it's important to not just look at the pictures, but to also read the text.


:asian:
 
Originally posted by Klondike93

I'm begining to see why it's important to not just look at the pictures, but to also read the text.


:asian:

Right- and understanding depth ends with how far you want to take it.

:asian:
 
How about Power Principles in Short One?

Short One gives examples of;

Marriage of Gravity
Torque (rotation and counter rotation)
Backup Mass

Peace,
Sandor
 
Originally posted by C.E.Jackson

The back elbow can also be thought of as a strike... making this movement combined with the inward block as a two man attack.

The back elbow can also be thought of as a countergrab and pull against a grab and the inward block thought of as a strike against the opponents elbow for a break.



This is similar to the B1a and B1b methods is it not??? instead of striking to the to the elbow you could apply one of these i think.

Not sure if the Freestyle terminology is being used correctly here???

~~~Salute~~~

Jeremy
 
Hmm.
My opinion is it occurs when you settle into your stances (rooting), I could be wrong but that's how I'd look at it.
Jason Farnsworth
 
Originally posted by Rainman



what's that?:confused:

:asian:

It is one's ability/inability to be perceptive and functional in situations such as:

The body inverted

The body rotating

The body at heights

The body in flight



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Why Is Spatial Orientation Important?
Safety in the martial arts is, of course, paramount. It is also dependent upon the student knowing where they are.

The execution of many skills relies on the correct training of some muscular action during the performance of the skill. The more aware the student is of what the body is doing, where the body is, where the limbs are relative to the body, etc., the safer the student will be.



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What Limits One's Spatial Orientation Abilities?
This motor attribute is governed for the most part, by the kinesthetic sense that is compromised of two main anatomical components: the Vestibular System and the Proprioceptive System. The Vestibular System consists of the semi-circular canals in the middle ear and the Proprioceptive System consists of many different sensory receptors in the muscles, tendons and ligaments that monitor the position of body parts relative to the body.

As with all other senses, the kinesthetic sense responds to concentrated usage with greater sensitivity and to lack of usage with reduced sensitivity. .
 
Short Form 1, as stated in INFINITE INSIGHTS, Volume 5, teaches 17 points:
1. Staying down while in a stance.
2. To use an erect carriage.
3. Increasing peripheral vision
4. Always looking at your opponent.
5. Never exposing your back unnecessarily.
6. How to cover in a neutral bow stance.
7. To keep your head at a constant level while changing stances.
8. How to retreat from an opponent when you turn to face the then unkown.
9. Basic timing of hands and feet.
10. How to retreat from an opponent while retreating, (opposite hand, opposite foot).
11. Relaxing and tensing at the proper moment.
12. Angle changes in preparation for a mass attack.
13. How to use the opposite arm as a hidden weapon.
14. How to move up and down in an "L" pattern.
15. Repetition of the four basic blocks while you are retreating.
16. To have your block make contact at a distance from you so that your opponents punch will be diverted.
17. Crisp moves with snap and torque.

Gary Catherman
 
What about (not in any particular order)...

1. Lowering height
2. Narrowing width
3. Increasing depth
4. Breathing
5. Proper Body Alignment
6. Point of Origin
7. Directional Harmony
8. Coordinative Explosion
9. Back Up Mass
10. Knee checks
11. Rear Buckles
12. Settling
13. Timing
14. Rotational Force (body) & (arms)
15. RLLR - LRRL Hand Coordination
16. LRRL - RLLR Foot Coordination
17. Others..........
:asian:
 
If you wanted to take a good look at ALL the theories and principles, as well as possible self defense applications in Short Form 1 ... you could probably spend up to a year on this form ALONE!:shrug:
 

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