Respect

SJC

White Belt
Joined
Aug 5, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Just for the sake of saying, I thought I'd post. I have a deep respect for boxers, and kickboxers, and the training that's involved there.

When you train in some styles, the end result is beauty, or precision of technique, and that's admirable in itself.

But boxers are tested by actually hitting each other, judged on the results of fights, and the training itself is, from what I have observed, broad and intensive. The gyms I have visited usually lack the polish and gleam some schools work so hard to maintain. Boxing gyms are not like 'schools' so much, they appear to be more like 'garages'.

Not taking anything away from other styles or practitioners of other arts, as the strength of the style is the proficiency of the fighter. But of all the martial artists I have encountered, the boxers and kickboxers are the ones I really didn't want hitting me in the face, body or anywhere.

I would start myself, but those cats look like they really mean it...
 

seasoned

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
11,253
Reaction score
1,232
Location
Lives in Texas
I would definitely agree with you on this one. Boxers and kickboxers are in it for the punishment. They know getting hit is part of the game, plus dishing it out is something they learn early on.
icon14.gif
 

Ronin74

Brown Belt
Joined
Dec 30, 2008
Messages
434
Reaction score
13
To a certain extent, I think this also depends on the practitioner. For myself, I wouldn't necessarily say I'm in it for the punishment, but I hate having that question of, "will my training be enough to see me through against someone with that kind of training" looming over my head.

It's not to say that the arts we've practiced have no value, but boxers, kickboxers, and other competitive martial arts have a lot of emphasis on simple technique, sharp reflexes, timing, and overall conditioning. It wouldn't hurt to be able to take a punch or go the distance, or even have the conditioning to handle bone-on-bone contact when blocking.

But yeah... gotta respect 'em.
 

lklawson

Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 3, 2005
Messages
5,036
Reaction score
1,680
Location
Huber Heights, OH
I would definitely agree with you on this one. Boxers and kickboxers are in it for the punishment. They know getting hit is part of the game, plus dishing it out is something they learn early on.
icon14.gif
It's funny how attitudes change over time.

Both Haislet and O'Brien write in their manuals that boxers who think that boxing is a game of being able to absorb more punishment than the other guy while dishing out more than he can take are lacking in skill and refinement.

Though both do spend some time talking about how getting hit is part of the game and the "timid" boxer learns quickly that the fear of getting hit is worse than the reality, they still both advocate for a "scientific" game where the ideal boxer hits more than gets hit rather than simply absorbs more punishment.

Not diss'n you, just making an observation about how attitudes evolve.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

Nagel

Yellow Belt
Joined
Mar 16, 2009
Messages
37
Reaction score
1
Getting hit is a part of boxing, but no one is in it for the punishment.

I think that to have a certain mindset that dehumanizes boxing would be ideal. When I'm in the ring, instead of thinking in terms of mano-a-mano, I think about doing my best. It's like I'm trying to beat my best score (setting up punches, and trying not to make any mistakes). I look at it as a contest of boxing skill, where the boxers are not so much trying to fight each other but rather boxing itself.

In the end, boxing isn't about getting the best over someone to prove how to tough you are, boxing is an end in itself.
 

IcemanSK

El Conquistador nim!
MT Mentor
MTS Alumni
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
6,482
Reaction score
181
Location
Los Angeles, CA
Getting hit is a part of boxing, but no one is in it for the punishment.

I think that to have a certain mindset that dehumanizes boxing would be ideal. When I'm in the ring, instead of thinking in terms of mano-a-mano, I think about doing my best. It's like I'm trying to beat my best score (setting up punches, and trying not to make any mistakes). I look at it as a contest of boxing skill, where the boxers are not so much trying to fight each other but rather boxing itself.

In the end, boxing isn't about getting the best over someone to prove how to tough you are, boxing is an end in itself.


I think that's a great way to look at it. I heard boxing described once as a game of physical chess. It's about litle things & outsmarting (or out-manuevering) your opponent. Once one realizes that it's the punch that you don't see that knocks you out, it puts one's attention in a different place.

The amount of training that boxers & kickboxers go through is really amazing. As committed as I was to MA before I trained in kickboxing, I realized I didn't have what it took to train to fight as a kickboxer. I respect these folks a great deal!
 
Top