Practical application of juche?

Tiger-eye

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Does any one know where to find a place to research the practical applications of juche? We were working on it today in class by letting us just experiment and to be honest, that's a difficult form to decipher.
 

Earl Weiss

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Juche Ideology
"Hwang Jang-yop, the architecture of Juche Ideology, whodefected from
North Korea in February, 1997, and came to Korea to seek political asylum,
confessed that Juche Ideology isthe "weapon of dictatorship" and that it has
been used as a propaganda machine to deceive some leftist groups in the Republic
of Korea."


The philosphy is simply that man is the master of his own destiny. Like many things the NK Leader may claim to have originated it, but that is not true. The NK Leader adopted it and as Tyrants have done throughout history, corrupted it. Aside from the basic lesson of being master of your own destiny, another lesson is present in that the very founder of the philosophy defected from the country that abused it.

Here is a link to Volume 12 which contains Ju Che and the textbook examples / samples of applications.

http://www.bluecottagetkd.com/files/vol12.pdf
 

TrueJim

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If this helps... From, A Killing Art: The Untold History of Tae Kwon Do (by Alex Gillis, available from Amazon.com, including Kindle format)

"One gift that Choi gave to North Koreans was a new pattern of moves that he called Ju-Che, which was the name of North Korea's ideology. He did this to jettison the Ko-Dang pattern, which had been the pseudonym of one of Choi's heros, Cho Man-sik, a Christian educator and an early North Korean leader until communists imprisoned him in 1946. [29] Now that Choi's friends were those same communists, Ko-Dang had to go. Expunging it and creating Ju-Che was a sell-out to the communists , even though Choi argued that the change was not political. The term Ju-Che is nearly untranslatable in English: it means self-reliance and independence and, deeper, everything that makes Koreans Korean. [30] As if to highlight this, Choi designed the Ju-Che pattern to be the most difficult out of the twenty-four, demanding a jumping split-kick and two techniques that were supposed to stop momentarily in mid-air, as if the attacker were floating. Today, in gyms and championships around the world, we yell, Ju-Che after the final technique of this pattern, saluting North Korea's ideology whether we like it or not."
 

chrispillertkd

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If this helps... From, A Killing Art: The Untold History of Tae Kwon Do (by Alex Gillis, available from Amazon.com, including Kindle format)

>snip<

As if to highlight this, Choi designed the Ju-Che pattern to be the most difficult out of the twenty-four, demanding a jumping split-kick and two techniques that were supposed to stop momentarily in mid-air, as if the attacker were floating...

I really liked Gillis' book and thought it made some much needed information available to people. Comments like the one above, however, leave much to be desired. The techniques in question are dodging reverse turning kicks (reverse turning kicks which are executed while flying away from an opponent that is closing in). The don't stop "as if the attacker were floating." They stop at the point of focus, i.e. they stop where the opponent would be if you're hitting them. Just like every other reverse turning kick in the Chang Hun tul does. Eui-Am, for instance, has several reverse turning kicks which you stop at the point of focus. The only difference is you're on the ground, not flying. There''s no follow through because if you were hitting someone you wouldn't actually be kicking through them.

Sigh.

Pax,

Chris
 

Earl Weiss

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I really liked Gillis' book and thought it made some much needed information available to people. Comments like the one above, however, leave much to be desired.
Chris

Ditto on much needed info. However there were numerous instances where he made rash generalizations based on limited observations. My opinion is based on personal experience where I came away with an incorrect idea after one eperience with General Choi but the concept he was trying to convey became more clear after subsequent encounters. Have spoke to many others who also encountered this. Some concepts are not easily communicated.
 

chrispillertkd

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Ditto on much needed info. However there were numerous instances where he made rash generalizations based on limited observations. My opinion is based on personal experience where I came away with an incorrect idea after one eperience with General Choi but the concept he was trying to convey became more clear after subsequent encounters. Have spoke to many others who also encountered this. Some concepts are not easily communicated.

Master Weiss, I totally agree. There's a lot of good information in Mr. Gillis' book but I disagree with some of the conclusions he draws or inferences he makes. All in all its a great first entry to critical Taekwon-Do historical study. But it's still a first entry. I'm sure there is much left to be researched.


Pax,

Chris
 

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