No weapons sparring

stonewall1350

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Just a quick question for you guys. The guys in my gym don’t seem to do much other than knives and sticks. I know that some places do empty hand stuff, but ours I think I’ve seen them only do a few times (not in the class but I’m interested). Anyway. I know there is a big emphasis in kali about not “blocking” and a lot about avoiding strikes. Because you can’t absorb a knife to the ribs or a stick to the face or ribs. So I’m extending my question to hands only (which I’m interested in). What would you say the philosophy of the empty hand training is?

How much does it resemble boxing or some of the other sports? Are there a lot of parries? Avoiding strikes? Slipping? Do they teach blocks? I’m really curious because I’m starting to consider actually training my standing striking again after several years absent. There is an MMA class and they probably fit my style better (judo/bjj grappler) in some regards..but ultimately I’m interested in a more self defense mentality. Not as much on competition.


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drop bear

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You are going to find yourself in more live self defence situations in MMA (or that kind of set up) than you will in other arts.

 

Danny T

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In the pekiti-tirsia training I've had double knife is very similar to boxing with knives and our empty hands are based on double knife.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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From what I've done, there's a lot of pressing down on the second hand, or using footwork/grappling to get a chance to control their weapon. Don't do too much of it in sparring though for some reason, tends to be more of a drill. I'll have to ask if we can do more of that.
 

Anarax

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I know there is a big emphasis in kali about not “blocking” and a lot about avoiding strikes. Because you can’t absorb a knife to the ribs or a stick to the face or ribs.
Kali employs many different types of defensive techniques. Blocks, parries, evades, slips, etc. It really depends on the situation. You can parry or check knife attacks with your hands, they're just different when dealing with a knife opposed to an unarmed attack.

What would you say the philosophy of the empty hand training is?
Defanging is a huge concept. Essentially it's attacking your opponent's "weapons"(hands, arms) thus they can no longer attack nor defend themselves. It sounds odd, but the blocks and parries in Kali are tailored for defanging.
Suntukan/Panatukan is the empty handed portion of Kali. Western boxing has been heavily influenced by Panatukan over a long period of time.

How much does it resemble boxing or some of the other sports?
It's very similar to boxing, just without rules and has more techniques.

Are there a lot of parries? Avoiding strikes? Slipping? Do they teach blocks?
Yes
There is an MMA class and they probably fit my style better (judo/bjj grappler) in some regards..but ultimately I’m interested in a more self defense mentality. Not as much on competition.
That depends on the class and teacher. Some Kali schools place heavy emphasis on stick and knife, but neglect to the empty-handed portion. MMA schools are a dime a dozen nowadays, but there are great ones out there. I would try both and see which one you like more
 

geezer

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My foundation system was Latosa PMAS Escrima. The handwork or cadena de mano of that system was very much like boxing, but nastier. Filipino dirty boxing. But close enough that when you took out the "dirty" moves, Rene Latosa boxed for the USAF team without any previous Western boxing training.

One big difference, coming in from the weapons, was favoring a southpaw stance more.
 

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