Kyokushin Women Sparring

Not the biggest fan of kyokushin seems very limited on their defence and the way they train and spar is a good way to pick up injuries fast but just on the video these girls seem good enough
 
Yeah saw this the other week, some heavy sparring. We didn't go quite that hard in normal dojo sparring (depending on who you were with), but gradings were basically like this.
 
Really hard to fight at that sort of pressure and intensity and throw high spinning kicks.

Once you throw you risk loosing the gas tank to keep up with the exchange.

But if you polaxe someone with that kick. Then the risk is worth it.

So those two elements would have to be really carefully balanced.
 
Really hard to fight at that sort of pressure and intensity and throw high spinning kicks.

Once you throw you risk loosing the gas tank to keep up with the exchange.

But if you polaxe someone with that kick. Then the risk is worth it.

So those two elements would have to be really carefully balanced.
Often when I was being overwhelmed by my sparring partner and I was running out of gas, I would throw a jumping spinning back kick, even when being pushed back it works quite well. That being said it's not just a wildly thrown stab in the dark, I've trained it extensively so it's reliable and can get me out of a pickle!
 
Not the biggest fan of kyokushin seems very limited on their defence
There is plenty of defence techniques but the idea of the fighting style is that focusing on only defense is still draining energy and sooner or later the opponent will get you. So you need to balance the defense with actively attacking. In this energy balance, your don't waste energy on blocking or evading weak attacks. If it is not dangerous and you can stand the pain, then focus on countering even if you are yourself attacked, so as to push the opponent.

If you start out trying to avoid every attack, and focus only on that, you will loose.

The only think you never even consider "eating" is full attacks to the head, but as long as your guard is up to dampen the kick power, there is no need to jump away. Takingthe power from 90% to 10% is often good enough, getting "touched" is not dangerous, as "points" doesn't count in competition, only brinding opponent down in pain.

Our shihans often also emphasis that one does not need to avoid or block an attack completely, just a minor redirection to reduce the power is a very efficient defense technique. Otherwise you waste too much energy and exaggerate body movements.
and the way they train and spar is a good way to pick up injuries fast but just on the video these girls seem good enough
I think that is a good sparring, regarding strikes and body and leg kicks that is like a harder sparring, but as for such head kicks in sparring it's usually when you know that your opponent is good enough to catch it. Beginner learn to eat hard attackes, but follow through head kicks is often for competition or sparring with something you know is good.

Othwewise the rules of friendly sparring is hard contact with punching and leg and body strikes are fine, but light contact on head kicks, so noone gets knocked. Accident's are rare. I got a foot in my head a few times, but from higher ranked with good control, so those kicks are peanuts as compare to the body attacks. I value my brain, and I still feel very safe in kyokushin. If you enter full contact competitions however, then the chance of getting knocked by a head kicks is higher, but so far I don't aspire to compete. I don't see it as a sport in that sense, although "competing" with your peers in sparring is fun and energizing.
 
Really hard to fight at that sort of pressure and intensity and throw high spinning kicks.

Once you throw you risk loosing the gas tank to keep up with the exchange.

But if you polaxe someone with that kick. Then the risk is worth it.

So those two elements would have to be really carefully balanced.
If the spin is near the top of the list in your tool bag for competency and effectiveness, it is a smart kick to use. I think the caveat is being able to match the kick with the intensity of the fight.
I could throw them without any real thought while thinking 2-3 strikes ahead post kick.
If the opponent likes to press, spins are a great choice to slow them down, as long as you are good at the spin and know what to do post kick. But guys that press are also usually good at predicting a spin so you cannot give them away.
To me, weight bias is extremely important on a spinning kick used to create space. The kicking leg usually is Not going to return and all your force is going Into the kick, so stepping forward is the usual result. This can be a bad thing if you are not ready for it.
 
There is a guy who trains with us a bit. Duane.

It is interesting the things he is very good at as a result of what his training develops.


And basically he is like a piece of oak. Getting in to a leg kick exchange means you will loose and get hurt.
Those are good low kicks! Both outside and inside. I use them alot, but they work best with sometone with wider stance. Some people have a tight stance And are fast at blocking outside, then the only think that works is low kicks to the calfes (to avoid the blocking knee) but those are nasty in friendly sparring.
 
Opinions?

Kyokushin Women Sparring​

My overall opinion re: from what I've seen is not very high for various reasons. However, these clips (women and men) sparring showed better form and technique than I've previously seen. Kudos to the instructor of that school.
 
I like that they have the control to kick hard to the body and legs, but still land the head kicks lightly enough so no one gets hurt.
I would call that good sparring. Great control. I hope they understand how to finish those spinning kicks. They could be devastating.
 
Not the biggest fan of kyokushin seems very limited on their defence and the way they train and spar is a good way to pick up injuries fast but just on the video these girls seem good enough
I look at this type of sparring as conditioning. You can't condition the head so there's no value in striking it but you can work in other things in close range striking. The goal here is to be better conditioned than your opponent.

I do not look beyond this when it comes to this sytem.
 
Ive always liked Kyokushin, so I enjoyed watching those women spar.

Ive also known a number of Kyokushin black belt men. And every single one of them punch to the face when they spar outside their dojo. I havent personally known any female Kyokushin black belts so I cant speak for what they do.

The very first martial completion I ever saw was held at the old Boston Arena. It was team fighting that took place in a boxing ring.
A Koyokushin team against a Goju team.

It was very exciting. It was also a blood bath. There were punches to the face galore. I joined the Goju school the following week.
I didnt have the option of a Kyokushin school, there wasnt one in Boston. Had there been I probably would have joined both of them. Thats how much the Martial bug bit me.
 
Ive also known a number of Kyokushin black belt men. And every single one of them punch to the face when they spar outside their dojo.
Spar outside the dojo, meaning...? Street fights?

Some of my favourite techniques I ALWAYS use in sparring are really designed meant for the head, ridge hand strikes and my lead hook (immediatrely followed by a upper cut). But in sparring I instead throw the hook to the ribs/behing armpit or liver, or kidney and the uppercut insted is a solar plexus tate or shita tsuki.

Very common in kyokushin is overhand hooks to the collarbone/chest, but these just as easily goto the jaw in a real fight.

It takes good control to strike someone hard inthe upper/chest collarbone area WITHOUT slipping to the head, I have avoided that until very recenntly (1.5 year) until I start to feel confident in using this techqnique without risking hitting someone in the face by accident.

Also when I train the heavy bag (which i do regularly) I always train to strike at head level, this is why heavy bad training complements fighting. I also do everything much harder on the bag than in a real friendly sparring of course.
 
Spar outside the dojo, meaning...? Street fights?

Some of my favourite techniques I ALWAYS use in sparring are really designed meant for the head, ridge hand strikes and my lead hook (immediatrely followed by a upper cut). But in sparring I instead throw the hook to the ribs/behing armpit or liver, or kidney and the uppercut insted is a solar plexus tate or shita tsuki.

Very common in kyokushin is overhand hooks to the collarbone/chest, but these just as easily goto the jaw in a real fight.

It takes good control to strike someone hard inthe upper/chest collarbone area WITHOUT slipping to the head, I have avoided that until very recenntly (1.5 year) until I start to feel confident in using this techqnique without risking hitting someone in the face by accident.

Also when I train the heavy bag (which i do regularly) I always train to strike at head level, this is why heavy bad training complements fighting. I also do everything much harder on the bag than in a real friendly sparring of course.

No, not in street fights. Every Koyokushin black belt Ive know has been a gentleman.
I meant if they trained somewhere other than their own dojo. If there was face contact they were happy to play by those rules.

One other thing I noticed about the ones Ive known, they were all fit, all in really good shape.
 
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