Italian Close Combat?

arnisador

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There is an advertisement in this thread on E-Budo for:

"SISTEMA MILITARE ITALIANO" ITALIAN CLOSE COMBAT.

Is this an attempt to cash in on the popularity of (Russian) Systema or is it a recognized system? I know there are worthwhile modern Italian knife-fighting systems.
 
I found the book The Sicilian Blade : The Art of Sicilian Stiletto Fighting
interesting (I browsed a copy at Mr. Hartman's school). It has some discussions of very practical aspects of knife dueling that aren't often seen, and talks of practicing with small nail clippers or nail files that drew a small amount of blood so as to test who really knew their stuff.
 
I don't know the style but if I were to guess it probably isn't intended as a rip, and it's probably nothing like russian systema
 
I would imagine it is not like the russian system, after all it came from italy not russia.

The Italians have a long martial history back in the late middle ages (around 1300-1500) of eroupe if you wanted to learn martial arts there where two places you could go to study with the masters, Germany......and Italy. The manuals of the period are works of art in them selves and the martial aplication is equal to any easten MA I am aware of. Martial arts coming out of Italy, sure that is nothing new. hey have been doing it all along.



Despair Bear
 
don't forget spain.. twards the 15th/16th century germany realy gave way to the spanish in their leadership position in training. and latter on the french kicked in with their small swards.
 
Originally posted by arnisador

There is an advertisement in this thread on E-Budo for:

"SISTEMA MILITARE ITALIANO" ITALIAN CLOSE COMBAT.

Is this an attempt to cash in on the popularity of (Russian) Systema or is it a recognized system? I know there are worthwhile modern Italian knife-fighting systems.


Hi I'm new on the forum. I was born and raised in italy, the term "sistema militare" is a generic term to describe military martial arts in general, or at least that's what I believe. To my knowledge, there was a particular system of Italian ju jitsu that was tought to the military on the alps called "Bianchi Ju Jitsu"
Other Italian martial arts i'm aware of are:

Arte Del abbracciare:
("art of the embrace") is a medieval Italian form of unarmed combat presented in Fiore dei Liberi's Flos Duellatorum del Armis, published in 1410.

Arte Della Daga:
The Italian Arte della Daga is a method of dagger combat which also included unarmed defense against the dagger.

The art of "bastone" (stick/cane fighting)
several styles such as
- bastone pugliese
- bastone siciliano (or paranza)
- bastone napoletano (or U taccaro)

S'istrumpa
old style of Sardinian wrestling

Cimento (or steccado)
old style venetian bare knuckle boxing

Novascrimia:
Modern italian martial art based on medieval forms of combat, i'm doing more research on it at the time

Pugilatus cestis:
i believe some martial artists are trying to reconstruct what was the ancient roman boxing syle

Scherma (fencing)
several styles exist, mostly regional (northern and southern)
will update u with more infos as i obtain them :)
arrivederci
 
Originally posted by KickingDago




Hi I'm new on the forum. I was born and raised in italy, the term "sistema militare" is a generic term to describe military martial arts in general, or at least that's what I believe. To my knowledge, there was a particular system of Italian ju jitsu that was tought to the military on the alps called "Bianchi Ju Jitsu"
Other Italian martial arts i'm aware of are:

Arte Del abbracciare:
("art of the embrace") is a medieval Italian form of unarmed combat presented in Fiore dei Liberi's Flos Duellatorum del Armis, published in 1410.

Arte Della Daga:
The Italian Arte della Daga is a method of dagger combat which also included unarmed defense against the dagger.

The art of "bastone" (stick/cane fighting)
several styles such as
- bastone pugliese
- bastone siciliano (or paranza)
- bastone napoletano (or U taccaro)

S'istrumpa
old style of Sardinian wrestling

Cimento (or steccado)
old style venetian bare knuckle boxing

Novascrimia:
Modern italian martial art based on medieval forms of combat, i'm doing more research on it at the time

Pugilatus cestis:
i believe some martial artists are trying to reconstruct what was the ancient roman boxing syle

Scherma (fencing)
several styles exist, mostly regional (northern and southern)
will update u with more infos as i obtain them :)
arrivederci


I forgot to include "la canne italiana (scuola milanese di canne)" which is the italian interpretation of the french "la canne", even the french martial art of savate (boxe francaise) was very important in the italian area of Genova.
 
Originally posted by KickingDago

I forgot to include "la canne italiana (scuola milanese di canne)" which is the italian interpretation of the french "la canne", even the french martial art of savate (boxe francaise) was very important in the italian area of Genova.

I didn't know that! It makes sense I suppose.

Genoa--I've been there! I visited a friend whose father taught Dante at the university there.
 
beautiful city, famous for savate as well, the first non french to win a savate tournament were from genoa
 
On the subject I wanted to post some links on italian martial arts just in case anyone is interested:

this one is about the "maltese close combat system" and the "ar.ma.to" style. Both modern styles built on the basis of ancient western and eastern arts

http://www.mauriziomaltese.it/isam/armato.htm

this one is a page in regard to ancient gladiatorian martial arts such as pugilatus caestis, Pigmachia and pankratium
unfortunately the site is in italian I'll post the link but i plan to ask permission to the site editor to translate the site in english and post it on this forum

http://www.hapkido.it/ricerca.htm
 

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