is Jun Chong TKD a legitimate TKD dojo for self defense?

TKD_luver

White Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
I wanted to sign up for TKD, and I really like Jun Chong TKD. However, I heard by some that TKD isn't a realistic means of self defense because a lot of the places teaching are "mcdojos." I've heard that ITF and WTF are slightly better, especially ITF. But I want to know about the dojo I'm thinking of signing up for or if I should do boxing. I am thinking if someone can specifically verify that Jun Chong, who is supposed to be legendary, is as good as he says he is, then I'll sign up for it. I mean for self-defense purposes. I know he teaches WTF TKD.
Anyone who has trained there have an opinion?
 

Earl Weiss

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
3,239
Reaction score
631
A. You need to do what you really like.
B. You need to decide what your primary or sole goal is. If it is Self Defense, You will spend a lot of non productive time in a "Art" or a "Sport".
C. Most disciplines offer Self Defense training. How much may be more due to the schoool than the discipline. Some may ingrain really poor habits. Some may ingrain really good habits.
 

donnaTKD

Master Black Belt
Joined
May 3, 2014
Messages
1,024
Reaction score
178
Location
llanfairfechan - north wales uk
you would prolly be better going along and seeing if it's all it's cracked up to be.

as for TKD v Boxing --- they are extremes in terms of arts TKD takes far longer to think you are getting anywhere and tbh most people can throw a well directed punch if necessary

i used to do Muay Thai and TKD and ended up choosing Muay Thai cos IMO it gave me a broader range of useful everyday skills.

it just depends on what your own expectations are in terms of your own MA future.
 

msmitht

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Jun 4, 2009
Messages
836
Reaction score
66
Location
san diego
I wanted to sign up for TKD, and I really like Jun Chong TKD. However, I heard by some that TKD isn't a realistic means of self defense because a lot of the places teaching are "mcdojos." I've heard that ITF and WTF are slightly better, especially ITF. But I want to know about the dojo I'm thinking of signing up for or if I should do boxing. I am thinking if someone can specifically verify that Jun Chong, who is supposed to be legendary, is as good as he says he is, then I'll sign up for it. I mean for self-defense purposes. I know he teaches WTF TKD.
Anyone who has trained there have an opinion?
[/ My opinion: if you want self defense go to a bjj school. You want to learn to kick really well? Do tkd.
 

bluewaveschool

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
745
Reaction score
13
Location
Kentucky
Any martial art CAN be excellent for self defense. It depends on the school and how much you put into it. There is no 'best', though a lot of people I hear say there is happen to be grapplers (mostly BJJ) because 'fights always go to the ground'. The other assumption you hear that is TKD just kicks to the head. I'd never kick to the head in a fight. There is plenty in TKD, or Karate, or Muay Thai or any other stand up art to defend yourself with.
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
15,333
Reaction score
1,102
Location
In Pain
Most martial arts won't help you if you stare down the barrel of a gun...

SD aspects are usually overblown: Unless you work as a cop/bouncer/soldier/prison guard or are terminally stupid and dwell in dark alleys, chances of needing hard core SD skills are minimal (and then it would be Crav Maga ;))

What TKD can do for you - and the over all organization is not an indicator of quality - is that it gets you fit and teaches you techniques that can be effective. Can....

As grappling can be effective. But all kidding aside, you need more than one style to be equipped for all eventualities, and continue training it. My school belonged to an ITF off shoot (Via ATA, twice removed).
We had some SD drills and theories. We did not practice them much though (cycles between grading was 8 weeks, cramming the class time with advancement stuff)

The point is to enjoy the journey. Down the road you might want to add something, BJJ is good to round out a kicking art or switch completely.
 
OP
T

TKD_luver

White Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
So theoretically, if I cross trained in TKD and boxing would that be better than doing just one? I mean, would that be an effective combo? Or should I just do boxing or TKD by itself?
 
Last edited:

skribs

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 14, 2013
Messages
5,749
Reaction score
1,418
It doesn't matter the art or the organization, a McDojo is a McDojo. There are benefits and drawbacks pertaining to real fighting skills to learning techniques in a traditional format, learning sparring, and learning self defense skills.
 
OP
T

TKD_luver

White Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
It doesn't matter the art or the organization, a McDojo is a McDojo. There are benefits and drawbacks pertaining to real fighting skills to learning techniques in a traditional format, learning sparring, and learning self defense skills.

That's why I specifically am looking at JCTKD and not just TKD. It's because I believe exactly what your saying. So then are ALL TKD dojos McDojos?
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
15,333
Reaction score
1,102
Location
In Pain
So theoretically, if I cross trained in TKD and boxing would that be better than doing just one? I mean, would that be an effective combo? Or should I just do boxing or TKD by itself?

what do you want to achieve?
Self Defense skills?
Or learn a martial art you enjoy, with SD skills being incidental and a side effect.

My school taught plenty of hand techniques along with kicking, but of course it was only a part of the whole thing. We also had classes cross training us in grappling, but those were on the side, not mandatory.

McDojo...that is usually a battle cry of the 'purists' who can't fathom that somebody dares to make a buck by training, keeping the lights on and the doors open, possibly even able to make a living off the art.
Not all school are created equal, not even withing the same organization!
I had a petty good instructor, compared to another school owner, who's students didn't really impress me all that much, same curriculum, etc...

I don't know about boxing, so I can't really tell you anything about that.
 
OP
T

TKD_luver

White Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
I want to achieve self defense skills, but I also want it to be fun... I am serious about self defense though. I also wonder what you mean by "battle cry?" But I've always thought that in any martial art, a dojo/studio can be good or bad. What do you mean though, none the less, that when someone says a dojo is a "McDojo" that that is a "battle cry"? Are you trying to say there aren't any bad dojos? That doesn't make sense to me.
 
Last edited:

Ironcrane

Blue Belt
Joined
Dec 9, 2008
Messages
262
Reaction score
7
Location
Oregon
Not all TKD schools are McDojos. And every style of Martial art has been called unrealistic at one point or another. I don't think any of us has experience with this school so none of us can give you an exact answer to your questions. Only thing I could find out when looking it up, is that it is kind of expensive. And as far as combining it with Boxing, it is possible to do. But weather or not you should try to do that is something only you can decide for yourself.
Find out if the school offers a free tryout, and give it a try. And do the same with a Boxing school. (If they offer one)
 

Jaeimseu

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Messages
915
Reaction score
265
Location
Austin, Texas, USA
Don't worry about if somebody thinks the school is a mcdojo. Try it out and if you like it, keep at it.

"Mcdojo" means different things coming from different people. To some it means "has lots of students/more students than my school." To others it may mean "is a business." Some people think a mcdojo is "watered down," which could occasionally be somewhat true, but is more commonly just a cliche used by people who probably don't really know what they're talking about.

If the instructor is good at and passionate about teaching, the school will likely have plenty of good to offer, even if said teacher drives an expensive car.

Sent from my SHV-E210K using Tapatalk
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
15,333
Reaction score
1,102
Location
In Pain
well, if they charge you a nice lump sum when you walk in the door, hand you a BB, and expect you learn the curriculum on the 'honor system', well, that's a McDojo. :D
Only half kidding here, there are plenty of mail order shops like that advertised in MA magazines....

The biggests SD aspect of training is that yo become more self aware.
You become fit and change your posture, etc, signaling far and wide that you are not an easy target. As I said above, unless you actively seek out danger, either by profession or lifestyle, that is probably the single most important aspect you can achieve with training.

Many do look down on organizations that hand black belts out in under two years.
:idunno: To me a BB only means that I learned how to walk and am now ready for more in depth instruction
By all means the school awarding me the BB would be considered a belt mill, and yet, I think the instruction was good, for what I wanted out of the art.

Plus, of course, you are not married to a style or school!
Should you decide down the road you prefer a more hard hitting style or would like to switch to pure sport, nothing will keep you!
I would love to go back with my instructor, but the organization changed so much around I cannot agree with it anymore. Tough luck, he is not the only game in town.
 
OP
T

TKD_luver

White Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
I actually used to train there and on and off at different boxing studios. I just didn't heavily focus on one art. Now, I'm more willing to take one art more seriously. I think I'll go back to Jun Chong because if people call him "the best of the best" in reviews time and time again, how much of a mcdojo can he actually be? I think his training will work pretty well for me. I was recovering from runners knee and found out I just had flat feet. Nothing is wrong with my knee, and that's why I'm getting back into martial arts. I know its kind of awkward that I would say that, now but I said it. I think I'll go back to TKD. Thanks for the advice. But how do I tell if someone is legit? I just want to make sure.
 
Last edited:
OP
T

TKD_luver

White Belt
Joined
Nov 26, 2013
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
Also, has anyone been to CSUN? I'm going off to college in a few months and don't think I'll have Jun Chong there. But I will have another teacher who taught the LA Swat team for a year. His name is Hiroyasu Fujishima. He teaches karate and TKD. Has anyone heard of him also? I'm thinking of joining the TKD club, which is where he teaches in case that's what your wondering. I still might try boxing though.
 
Last edited:

Thousand Kicks

Green Belt
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
110
Reaction score
18
I'm not exactly sure what you are looking to get out of this discussion. Ultimately you have to choose what you want to do.

As said in previous replies, you can't judge a Dojang based on what other people think of it. You have to try them for yourself. This means you may trial several before you find a place that fits what you want.

As far as boxing goes. I have spent several years boxing and in TKD and you have to reallize that a school can teach TKD as a sport or a self defense art, but boxing is a sport. There is no "street" boxing. A trainer will show you how to box withing the confines of the rules of boxing. So if you are looking strictly for self defense, obviously there are aspects of boxing that are useful, but it is also limited.

All martial arts have deficiencies. To become a complete martial artist means to train in multiple arts. Then, the hardest part of all is learning to meld all the styles together. You have to be able to transition from striking to grappling, short range to long range, stand up to ground fighting. Not many people are capable of that.

My suggestion; find a MMA gym and see how you like it. You will have mutiple styles to experience and learn how to incorporate all of them together.
 

skribs

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 14, 2013
Messages
5,749
Reaction score
1,418
That's why I specifically am looking at JCTKD and not just TKD. It's because I believe exactly what your saying. So then are ALL TKD dojos McDojos?

Sorry, my post was a little bit brief. What I meant is that:

1) McDojos aren't specific to TKD, and
2) Just because some TKD schools are McDojos, it doesn't mean that all TKD schools are McDojos.

If all I was learning was forms or sparring, I would feel like I was getting very little self defense, but I feel very confident with the curriculum at my TKD school.
 

Latest Discussions

Top