Im Interested in getting a new sword.

Flying Crane

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I wish I'd been there to hear the ER staff's response to your story. :D
Oh I was the highlight of the evening, that was for sure.

“So…what kung fu school was this…?”

“Oh, I’m the teacher. But it was just me working by myself in the back yard. Why, are you…interested…?”

“Kinda. I trained aikido and Japanese sword at UC Davis down the road.”

“Well here, take my card. But I understand if this undermines your confidence in me a little bit.”
 

isshinryuronin

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I like this as this has been a problem with some of the people I sparred with in the past. Setting the mood and purpose of what is about to occur. When I teach, I like for people to get into the mind set of sparring to learn and not to use so much force that they are afraid to take risks and make mistakes.

I think I'm going to create something similar to help set the mood and the purpose. It sounds like it helps get people on the same page which is important. I like to spar to learn, but if my sparring partner isn't on the same page then I won't be to "spar to learn" as I have will need to match the intensity and use more reliable defense and attacks that I already know.

if both are on the same page vs having their own goals for sparring, then both will benefit greatly and injuries will be reduced.

Do you know where I can see examples of this?
When someone in class was going too hard, Sensei (a fearsome man) would jump in and give the offender a taste of his own medicine. It was very effective. A few years later I had a student (who happened to be a well known TV and movie actor) who did a takedown without controlling his partner's fall. I followed Sensei's example. Nothing personal, just a lesson. He became a friend and attended my wedding.

Practice sparring isn't a match - there is no winning or losing, no scoring, much like pee-wee soccer. The other person is not seen as an opponent, but rather a partner. How to foster such an atmosphere? Mutual respect, a calm mind, self-control, being on the same page as to the purpose as you said, and a referee to enforce same.

I think there should be an element of playfulness involved, of experimenting and having fun. I find this can carry over into competitive sparring, keeping one loose and less inhibited in techniques. I've seen this in high level black belt competition. They don't really seem to be trying to win, just enjoying themselves with their art and letting points come as they may. Smiles during the match are not uncommon. That says a lot.
 

JowGaWolf

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When I stuck myself in the leg two years ago with my Dao, it was like an afterthought. At first my thought was “oh I bumped my leg.” Then my thought was “oh damn [insert long string of expletives] I better take a look at that.”

Just a moment of failing to consider the full path of the point was all it took. No effort at all, just a bit of gravity. And just a few days earlier I had been thinking to myself, “it could probably be a little bit sharper, without being too sharp.” Nope, didn’t need it.
My staff bites me from time to time. It waits for the smallest opportunities to bite.

That's a nasty cut, but a good one.
 

isshinryuronin

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My staff bites me from time to time. It waits for the smallest opportunities to bite.
Nunchaku are known to turn on its owner. I've banged my knee with tonfa and grazed my side with a sharp sai. Luckily, I've never been bit by my sharp katana. I liken weapons to a wolfdog. They may walk alongside you and forge a delicate bond, but they are not quite domesticated, not really a pet. You have to know their ways and not get careless around them.
 

Gyakuto

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When I stuck myself in the leg two years ago with my Dao, it was like an afterthought. At first my thought was “oh I bumped my leg.” Then my thought was “oh damn [insert long string of expletives] I better take a look at that.”

Just a moment of failing to consider the full path of the point was all it took. No effort at all, just a bit of gravity. And just a few days earlier I had been thinking to myself, “it could probably be a little bit sharper, without being too sharp.” Nope, didn’t need it.
Oh I remember you doin that 🤢
 

Gyakuto

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Interestingly, I felt no pain. Even when getting it patched up, and after the anesthetic wore off it just didn’t hurt.
A BBC news reported a fisherman off Grimsby, who (to cut a long story short) had his leg pulled off in the netting winch. There was only about a cup blood on the deck (arteries can sometimes self-seal when pulled or ripped apart) and he felt no pain. He informed the coastguard who were sceptical of his story and took a ‘couple of paracetamol’ in case the pain did kick in! Apparently he hopped over the into the rescue boat!
 

Gyakuto

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Usually doesn't, once the incision is closed.
I believe the pain is derived from air acting upon the free nerve endings. That’s one of the reasons they suggest covering burns with kitchen cling film!
 

Dirty Dog

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A BBC news reported a fisherman off Grimsby, who (to cut a long story short) had his leg pulled off in the netting winch. There was only about a cup blood on the deck (arteries can sometimes self-seal when pulled or ripped apart) and he felt no pain. He informed the coastguard who were sceptical of his story and took a ‘couple of paracetamol’ in case the pain did kick in! Apparently he hopped over the into the rescue boat!
They key point missing is that they can spasm (resulting in little or no bleeding) FOR A WHILE. I sure hope the recue folks wasted no time in getting a tourniquet in place.
I believe the pain is derived from air acting upon the free nerve endings. That’s one of the reasons they suggest covering burns with kitchen cling film!
Agreed. That's the currently accepted theory anyway, and it's accepted because it both makes sense and fits with the anecdotal evidence. It's similar to the mechanism behind phantom pain from amputations.
 

Gyakuto

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Can you summarise, please. I don’t have a FB account.
 

Gyakuto

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That dead drills don't teach fighting well.

In this case test cutting isn't a good indication of fighting ability.
Oh yes, absolutely. The accurate name for the practise is ‘suimonogiri’ which means cutting stationary objects. Enemies don’t tend to keep still! I personally think it’s of no real value to ones swordsmanship skills, but it is a lot of fun!
 

JowGaWolf

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That dead drills don't teach fighting well.

In this case test cutting isn't a good indication of fighting ability.
Oh yes, absolutely. The accurate name for the practise is ‘suimonogiri’ which means cutting stationary objects. Enemies don’t tend to keep still! I personally think it’s of no real value to ones swordsmanship skills, but it is a lot of fun!
I never saw it as something that is done for fighting. I always saw it as a benefit to practice one's cutting swing. You can gauge the quality of your swing by examining how the object was cut. Sort of like punching a heavy bag, it's not just for hitting hard. One must pay attention to how first lands on the bag to gauge the quality of the punch. "Cut testing" where people are just cutting bottles and random stuff aren't testing anything which is why they never talk about swing technique. It is also why stuff like this happens

 

Flying Crane

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I never saw it as something that is done for fighting. I always saw it as a benefit to practice one's cutting swing. You can gauge the quality of your swing by examining how the object was cut. Sort of like punching a heavy bag, it's not just for hitting hard. One must pay attention to how first lands on the bag to gauge the quality of the punch. "Cut testing" where people are just cutting bottles and random stuff aren't testing anything which is why they never talk about swing technique. It is also why stuff like this happens

Oooohhhh Jeezuz…that was hard to watch.
 

isshinryuronin

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I never saw it as something that is done for fighting. I always saw it as a benefit to practice one's cutting swing. You can gauge the quality of your swing by examining how the object was cut. Sort of like punching a heavy bag, it's not just for hitting hard. One must pay attention to how first lands on the bag to gauge the quality of the punch. "Cut testing" where people are just cutting bottles and random stuff aren't testing anything which is why they never talk about swing technique. It is also why stuff like this happens

What an idiot! (The guy in the video, I mean.) I won't even get into his "technique" as he had none. Just his posture guaranteed failure. People should not use any weapon without training. To reiterate:
Live weapons practice is not playtime.
 

JowGaWolf

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Oooohhhh Jeezuz…that was hard to watch.
Yes it was. But it's a really good example that highlights that there's more to swinging a blade than just hacking at it. So many things done the wrong way. Look at the cut. Even though holding the watermellon like he did was stupid. He was destined to be cut as soon as he started to swing.. I'm not sure why he didn't lay it on it's side. Either way. He probably learned a big lesson that day.
1713998056990.png
 

Dirty Dog

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People like this are why I have a sign on my work locker that says "Stupid SHOULD be painful."
 

JowGaWolf

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People like this are why I have a sign on my work locker that says "Stupid SHOULD be painful."
This makes me happy for the friends that I've made in life. None of my friends would have let me do that. They would have pointed how all of the errors of me just trying to hold the watermelon and if they couldn't stop me then they would have at least offered a safer way to stablize the watermellon without me using my hands.
 

JowGaWolf

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But to bring things back to the lighter side of things. I'm always game for a good watermelon. Video. Speaking of a weapon turning on you. The funny part is the conversation after it happens lol. And the choice of words before it happens. Yes, your grass is greener than the other side lol.

 

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