Hit with the Body

Highlander

Green Belt
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
179
Reaction score
73
Location
Kentucky
How do you get your body into an attack ?
Let's talk about it with and without footwork.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
22,661
Reaction score
7,371
Are you just talking about striking? Or full on hip and shoulder stuff.

 

Jens

Green Belt
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
141
Reaction score
40
Could you give anymore of a break down?

watch this video! It explains how kinetic linking is done with western boxing bio-mechanics


Then extrapolate by implementing your wing chun bio-mechanics to do the same kinetic energy transfer as in the video.

here is another good video that explains kinetic linking
 
Last edited:

dvcochran

Grandmaster
Joined
Nov 7, 2017
Messages
7,047
Reaction score
2,296
Location
Southeast U.S.
How do you get your body into an attack ?
Let's talk about it with and without footwork.
From my experience in stand up fighting it has a lot to do with the setup and speed. So that may or may not include footwork. Body posture and motion can play a big part. Having tendencies and/or knowing your opponents tendencies are another big one. A crafty person can 'create' tendencies within a fight/match and play off of that.
 

drop bear

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Feb 23, 2014
Messages
22,661
Reaction score
7,371
It is a hard one to explain. I think the big trick is to link at the start of the strike rather than just at the end.

So hip and footwork in at the start and that should generate the speed to have some pep at the end.

And then at the end you create a solid structure rather than continue to try to push the arm forwards.

Which hopefully creates that nice relaxed whip that not only deals some damage but is also less taxing to throw.

I think there is three moments. So the initial sprint to get speed the then relaxation as you create the whip and then the brace on impact.
 

ShortBridge

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Feb 9, 2015
Messages
937
Reaction score
683
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
I'm not totally sure that I understand the question. I could assume in a few different directions and answer differently.

On one interpretation, I played hockey. A legal check in hockey is delivered with either your shoulder into (ideally) the center of your opponent's chest or by your hip into their hip or waist. It is possible to articulate those joints a bit and transfer energy with that articulation, but a really good hit also requires position (range) and timing. I'll confess to those "strikes" showing up occasionally in my kung fu play when the opportunity presents itself. I have other kung fu players strike with their shoulders who I don't think were hockey players, but I don't know what (if anything) those techniques are called.

If you'd like to clarify, I could answer a totally different way too. The mythical "horse" is a central component to Chinese and Japanese Martial Arts and I could say something like "without feet there are no hands" and mean it, but I'm not sure that's what you were after.
 
D

Deleted member 39746

Guest
Is this the unarmed version of trying to explain how to point with a shotgun using the bead?

Its kind of instinctual, you just drive with your hips/legs and just dont soley use your arm. Once you do it, you just do it.

Addendum: try vertical punching, you are sort of forced to drive in with your body more to get more power using that because there is less-no rotational power imparted. No idea if that would work to help you understand it or not.
 
OP
Highlander

Highlander

Green Belt
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
179
Reaction score
73
Location
Kentucky
A lot of the questions I ask on this forum are just simple questions I write down in my notebook and chew on. So I'm not so much 'looking for an answer' as I'm looking for other sides to the same puzzle. We all attack (pun intended) these things differently. And we all have something to teach/learn
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
29,050
Reaction score
9,875
Location
Hendersonville, NC
It is a hard one to explain. I think the big trick is to link at the start of the strike rather than just at the end.

So hip and footwork in at the start and that should generate the speed to have some pep at the end.

And then at the end you create a solid structure rather than continue to try to push the arm forwards.

Which hopefully creates that nice relaxed whip that not only deals some damage but is also less taxing to throw.

I think there is three moments. So the initial sprint to get speed the then relaxation as you create the whip and then the brace on impact.
Nice explanation.
 

Gerry Seymour

MT Moderator
Staff member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
29,050
Reaction score
9,875
Location
Hendersonville, NC
A lot of the questions I ask on this forum are just simple questions I write down in my notebook and chew on. So I'm not so much 'looking for an answer' as I'm looking for other sides to the same puzzle. We all attack (pun intended) these things differently. And we all have something to teach/learn
Given that, Ill reply from outside WC. To me, its all about getting body mass going in the direction of the strike. That can be the whole body (stepping in), one side of the body (rotating), or a shoulder (reaching) - and even combinations of these and other bits. Drop bear did a good job describing the timing of that movement. I teach it as rotation first, as that can be done without stepping and without sacrificing structure (no reaching). When a step is added, much of the rotation is eliminated, except on round strikes.
 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
7,238
Reaction score
3,370
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Here's a very old year old videoclip of LT hitting with his body. I have been on the receiving end of this and it is ...very powerful. I also saw LT use it to throw my si-dai through a wall. No one was hurt, let's just say we weren't welcome back at that hotel. :D

 

geezer

Grandmaster
MT Mentor
Joined
Oct 20, 2007
Messages
7,238
Reaction score
3,370
Location
Phoenix, AZ
BTW they tore down that motel way back in the 90s, but look what I found online - a "vintage poscard" of the place, "The Park Riviera". If you look at the upper left, just behind the motel sign you, can make out a couple of figures on a balcony patio. That's where we would get our private training with our Chinese instructor back in the early 80's.

....that is until he showed us the "shoulder punch"!

card00115_fr.jpg
 
Top