Hello, I haven't officially started my journey in martial arts, but intend to.

MetalDragon

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I am a 21 year old man with an interest in martial arts, for the following reasons:

A- I intend to get more physical exercise than I have been getting. Although I can speed-walk on the treadmill for about a half hour, this is far from sufficient and I need something to train my muscles and fine motor skills better so that my running and other cardio exercises can get better. Martial arts is the most motivating way I can think of to do this.

B- I want to learn some self-defense strategies and fighting techniques in case I need them in the future. In particular, working these techniques into my muscle memory is important because real self-defense situations can spike adrenaline and make it difficult to remember training, so having my body remember them as much as my mind is essential.

C- My sister and her husband both practiced martial arts- Muay Thai and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu respectively- and I since I'm very close to them in both relationship and location, I think practicing a martial art would simply be a cool way to connect with them even more. My brother-in-law says that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu would be difficult for me, and recommends Judo instead for a number of reasons.

That said, I'm pretty set on learning Judo, since it is one of the most balanced martial arts I've come across due to its balance of throws, ground fighting, and stand-up wrestling, in addition to the advice my brother-in-law gave me. But since Bruce Lee valued diversity in styles, I intend to embrace his philosophy and work in another style to accompany Judo, preferably some form of Kempo/Kenpo (Nippon Kempo and Shorinji Kempo sound like the most practical, but I'd love to hear additional recommendations in the replies).

My area is Coweta County, Georgia, United States, so if you know of any good schools for the aforementioned styles in the area, I'd love to hear recommendations.
 

Flying Crane

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Do some research. Make a list of the schools in your area, that you could attend. Check their class schedule and list those that work with your life/work schedule. Check their tuition fees and list those that fit your budget. Of the final list, visit them all. Talk to the teachers and students. Watch some classes. Do a free trial for all that offer it. Then pick the school that is most comfortable and in which you feel the most welcome and enjoy the training and find it interesting.

There is no best style. What is best for one person might be terrible for another. Finding a teacher with whom you are comfortable is also important. Advice from your sister and her husband is worth considering, but might be irrelevant for you. Starting with the school they attend could be a good way to begin, but look at others as well. If you do not enjoy the training or do not find it interesting, you will not stick with it. If you hate the teacher or the students with whom you train, you will not stick with it. No matter how highly regarded the style or teacher is. Time to find a different school because that one is Not a good match for you. You need to find a school that is a good match for you. Dont get hung up on a particular style. Find something that you enjoy and find interesting.

If you have a link to websites of schools you are considering, people here might be able to comment on their impressions. But there is no point in suggesting a particular style if we dont know if that style is even available in your area. Some styles are not common and do not exist at all in large regions of the country.

Let us know what is on your list. Happy training!
 

lklawson

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I am a 21 year old man with an interest in martial arts, for the following reasons:

A- I intend to get more physical exercise than I have been getting. Although I can speed-walk on the treadmill for about a half hour, this is far from sufficient and I need something to train my muscles and fine motor skills better so that my running and other cardio exercises can get better. Martial arts is the most motivating way I can think of to do this.

B- I want to learn some self-defense strategies and fighting techniques in case I need them in the future. In particular, working these techniques into my muscle memory is important because real self-defense situations can spike adrenaline and make it difficult to remember training, so having my body remember them as much as my mind is essential.
Cool...

C- My sister and her husband both practiced martial arts- Muay Thai and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu respectively- and I since I'm very close to them in both relationship and location, I think practicing a martial art would simply be a cool way to connect with them even more. My brother-in-law says that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu would be difficult for me, and recommends Judo instead for a number of reasons.
There's no reason that BJJ would be any more difficult than Judo. Judo's newaza (mat/ground techniques) is often pretty similar (or identical) to BJJ. BJJ often teaches takedowns which are included in Judo's throwing. Judo has more throwing and takedowns. BJJ has more ground work. Many BJJ players also practice Judo and many Judoka also practice BJJ. They're very closely related, BJJ having evolved from Judo for specific purposes.

That said, I'm pretty set on learning Judo, since it is one of the most balanced martial arts I've come across due to its balance of throws, ground fighting, and stand-up wrestling, in addition to the advice my brother-in-law gave me.
Cool. I prefer Judo too. But there's not much wrong with BJJ that isn't easily solved.

But since Bruce Lee valued diversity in styles,
Ignore Bruce Lee. He made some fun movies and said some interesting things, but time marches on.


I intend to embrace his philosophy and work in another style to accompany Judo, preferably some form of Kempo/Kenpo (Nippon Kempo and Shorinji Kempo sound like the most practical, but I'd love to hear additional recommendations in the replies).

My area is Coweta County, Georgia, United States, so if you know of any good schools for the aforementioned styles in the area, I'd love to hear recommendations.
The local BJJ school may also teach Judo. It's pretty common. Past that, just do a web search. Both Judo and BJJ are pretty good at self-policing and you don't really see many poseures in either.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

BILLB

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Good for you MetalDragon my your journey be long and fruitful.
 

Brian King

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Welcome to the forum MetalDragon. Nothing to add to the thread that wouldn't be an echo of Flying Crane's post. Good luck on your journey.
 

Judo boi

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I would definitely recommend Judo over BJJ (slight bias here) but would just warn you it is rougher on the body than BJJ or even Muay Thai
Don't let that deter you though, if you find a good school and combine it with a striking art you will be a well rounded beast. Even Judo by itself is a solid defensive style. Good luck and keep us posted on your progress
 

SW1

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Good luck on your journey! To echo some of the other comments, check out the schools around and find the best fit for you now. And realize, that could change at some point down the road.
 

Olde Phart

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Do some research. Make a list of the schools in your area, that you could attend. Check their class schedule and list those that work with your life/work schedule. Check their tuition fees and list those that fit your budget. Of the final list, visit them all. Talk to the teachers and students. Watch some classes. Do a free trial for all that offer it. Then pick the school that is most comfortable and in which you feel the most welcome and enjoy the training and find it interesting.

There is no best style. What is best for one person might be terrible for another. Finding a teacher with whom you are comfortable is also important. Advice from your sister and her husband is worth considering, but might be irrelevant for you. Starting with the school they attend could be a good way to begin, but look at others as well. If you do not enjoy the training or do not find it interesting, you will not stick with it. If you hate the teacher or the students with whom you train, you will not stick with it. No matter how highly regarded the style or teacher is. Time to find a different school because that one is Not a good match for you. You need to find a school that is a good match for you. Dont get hung up on a particular style. Find something that you enjoy and find interesting.

If you have a link to websites of schools you are considering, people here might be able to comment on their impressions. But there is no point in suggesting a particular style if we dont know if that style is even available in your area. Some styles are not common and do not exist at all in large regions of the country.

Let us know what is on your list. Happy training!
I agree with Flying Crane. The school and instructors have got to be a good fit with you. The school I am training at is more like a family than just a class. Age-wise (kids to seniors) as well as the comradery. It was like that from the start, beginning with the instructors and then expanding throughout the students. I was 64 when I started and, because of my perfectionist attitude, it was frustrating at times. I used to do TKD when I was in my twenties and I remembered my abilities. Not so at 64 and a bit overweight. Instructors encouraged me with the thought that I wasn't competing against another student, but with myself. Go at my own pace. Measure my achievements based on what I was doing last month, not them younger whipper-snappers. I made it to black belt and now it's like beginning all over because I am learning new techniques. Expanding into muay thai and a little more jiu jitsu mixed in with the training. Can't quit now!
 

KempoBlackbelt

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Congratulations for taking the first step towards a future in martial arts. Like you at 21 I decided that I had been watching martial arts movies for long enough and wanted to get engaged in doing it for similar reasons. Thirty plus years later I'm a 6th degree black belt in kempo karate, an instructor and so glad I did it. It's changed my life in many positive ways.

I agree with the advice given to find the school that fits you and look for quality instruction. A good instructor and school makes a huge difference and should be a very careful decision. Starting at the wrong school and having to unlearn bad habits is a costly mistake. My advice is to take a week or more of instruction at different schools and see where you fit best. Don't let the style of the martial arts limit you to the schools you look at. In my opinion you are better off learning from a great instructor in a different style, than learning the style you want with a poor instructor or wrong school. I looked at many schools and thought I had to take a particular style of martial arts. Many people like to dump on kempo and karate overall but the studio and instructors I found were so GREAT I knew I had found the right place to learn no matter the style. Feel free to walk away after a lesson, week, month or year if the school and instructor aren't helping you to become the martial artist you want to become.

With that said though realize that the difference between a white belt and black belt is the determination to keep coming back no matter what. In my 30+ years in karate I've worked out with many who much more talented than I were but lacked the ability to stick with it and push themselves. There were be challenging days, lessons that don't work for you, injuries, days you don't feel like attending class, etc. Making changes to your schedule and workload to ensure that you keep on attending is critical. No one starts martial arts with the plan of dropping out but we've seen in our school that 98% of students never achieve black belt. One percent get to second degree black belt and beyond. Less than a handful get to Master level. Determination is key.

Lastly, enjoy it. If martial arts becomes work you're less likely to stick with it. If you can't laugh and have a good time at class than find another school. There of course should be discipline and time to be serious but also have time to laugh, talk, and enjoy your instructor and fellow students. The reality is that most likely you'll never use your martial arts in real life. Martial Arts are more for enjoyment, relaxation, etc. than self protection. The more you learn you are much more likely to walk away from a fight than to have one.

Good luck in your future in the arts.
 

Sag1200

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I am a 21 year old man with an interest in martial arts, for the following reasons:

A- I intend to get more physical exercise than I have been getting. Although I can speed-walk on the treadmill for about a half hour, this is far from sufficient and I need something to train my muscles and fine motor skills better so that my running and other cardio exercises can get better. Martial arts is the most motivating way I can think of to do this.

B- I want to learn some self-defense strategies and fighting techniques in case I need them in the future. In particular, working these techniques into my muscle memory is important because real self-defense situations can spike adrenaline and make it difficult to remember training, so having my body remember them as much as my mind is essential.

C- My sister and her husband both practiced martial arts- Muay Thai and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu respectively- and I since I'm very close to them in both relationship and location, I think practicing a martial art would simply be a cool way to connect with them even more. My brother-in-law says that Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu would be difficult for me, and recommends Judo instead for a number of reasons.

That said, I'm pretty set on learning Judo, since it is one of the most balanced martial arts I've come across due to its balance of throws, ground fighting, and stand-up wrestling, in addition to the advice my brother-in-law gave me. But since Bruce Lee valued diversity in styles, I intend to embrace his philosophy and work in another style to accompany Judo, preferably some form of Kempo/Kenpo (Nippon Kempo and Shorinji Kempo sound like the most practical, but I'd love to hear additional recommendations in the replies).

My area is Coweta County, Georgia, United States, so if you know of any good schools for the aforementioned styles in the area, I'd love to hear recommendations.
Sir, there is no way to say better what Mr. Iron Crane has already said, but I would respectfully suggest that instead of intending, change to a verb of action, as in you are starting in June. The best thing my instructor ever did 40 years ago was to throw me a uniform and to tell me he'd see me the next day. Not trying to be rude, but if he hadn't, I would still be intending. God bless on your journey, I hope you start soon.
 

Olde Phart

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Sag1200: spot on! Our family moved to a location an hour away from our dojang, but we still kept going. Sure, it was a long ways away, but the "family atmosphere" was hard to leave. Yeah, there were many times I just didn't feel like battling the traffic and we didn't go. But, it was a temporary situation and we kept at it. One of the tenets of our dojang is perseverance. It's a decision, not a wish. I've got at least 2 years before I can test for 2nd dan. At 67, that might seem a little more like a dream than a goal. Hey, I overcame open heart surgery 18 months ago. It's possible!
 

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