Healing and Kenpo

K

Katie Simmons

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This summer I was fortunate enough to head out to San Jose, CA to study chotaifuku with Ted Sumner. Chotaifuku is a kind of deep tissue restorative massage designed to purge the lymph system and break up knots in the muscles. It was taught to Sumner by Professor Sig Kufferuth, who was taught chotaifuku as part of his regular kenpo training. The resorative arts were a necessary counterpart to the combative.

So my question is: How essential do you feel the healing arts are to kenpo?

I know the majority of you have probably not learned the chotaifuku form, so I'm not speaking of that specifically. Really, I'd like to know if you're required to learn a type of massage, or specific cures for specific injuries (i.e. how to fix a dislocated shoulder, how to revive an unconscious sparring partner, etcetera), or CPR. Obviously, I have a bias, but I'd appreciate any opinions and info about what your instructors (or you, if you're the instructor) require.
 
Originally posted by Katie Simmons
This summer I was fortunate enough to head out to San Jose, CA to study chotaifuku with Ted Sumner. Chotaifuku is a kind of deep tissue restorative massage designed to purge the lymph system and break up knots in the muscles. It was taught to Sumner by Professor Sig Kufferuth, who was taught chotaifuku as part of his regular kenpo training. The resorative arts were a necessary counterpart to the combative.

So my question is: How essential do you feel the healing arts are to kenpo?

I know the majority of you have probably not learned the chotaifuku form, so I'm not speaking of that specifically. Really, I'd like to know if you're required to learn a type of massage, or specific cures for specific injuries (i.e. how to fix a dislocated shoulder, how to revive an unconscious sparring partner, etcetera), or CPR. Obviously, I have a bias, but I'd appreciate any opinions and info about what your instructors (or you, if you're the instructor) require.
Hey Katie,

Actually the Chotaifuku, was taught to Professor Kufferath by Professor Okazaki, his Jujutsu teacher. In 1943 he graduated from Professor Okazaki's course in restoration Therapy from Nikko Sanatorium.
He was also a good friend of Mr. Mitose and a training partner. In the recent years prior to his death, he co-founded with one of his long time students in CA the system of KenJU Ryu Kenpo Jujutsu, Based on Danzan Ryu Jujutsu and Mitose Kenpo.

I believe Sigung is also involved in healing arts as well.

Say hello to your Dad, and congratulations on his promotion.

Respectfully,
 
Ms. Simmons. I commend you on your expansion of your martial knowledge. It is the internal part that supports the external. The art you mention is not familiar to me, and I respectfully submit that you are speaking of Seifuku Jutsu, the Okazaki restorative massage. I have been training in this for some time from one of the late "Bud" Estes (also an Okazaki student) disciples and agree that it is wonderful. The fact that Mr. Sumner has made it an important part of his art is admirable.
The search never ends, and it shouldn't..
In spirit...
I.D.
 
Originally posted by kenmpoka
Hey Katie,

Actually the Chotaifuku, was taught to Professor Kufferath by Professor Okazaki, his Jujutsu teacher. In 1943 he graduated from Professor Okazaki's course in restoration Therapy from Nikko Sanatorium.
He was also a good friend of Mr. Mitose and a training partner. In the recent years prior to his death, he co-founded with one of his long time students in CA the system of KenJU Ryu Kenpo Jujutsu, Based on Danzan Ryu Jujutsu and Mitose Kenpo.

I believe Sigung is also involved in healing arts as well.

Say hello to your Dad, and congratulations on his promotion.

Respectfully,

Sorry about the error there. Sumner did at one point explain Sig's background to me, but I fear I didn't listen as closely as I should have (I was pretty exhausted - we spent about 8 hours moving his office to a new location before training for 4-6 hours every day). My point was only that healing was incorporated into regular martial arts training.
 
I personally feel that any healing art would be a good suppliment to any martial art for that matter. Although I've never been involved in this aspect of an art it would definately be worth learning.:asian:
 
Do any of you know anybody besides Sumner that requires training in the restorative arts?
 
Yes, many of the DanZan Ryu practitioners are required to learn it. There is a Seifuku Jutsu school given by a Ju-Jutsu school in Davis California that runs about 150 hours for certification.
A couple of Karate schools require it as well, but I don't know about the curriculum. You might run a nexus search on "DanZan Ryu" for who in your area teaches. Or, try www.ryuzado.com for some possible links.
The LaBounty line has always required first aid certification and CPR as a requirement for Shodan. They also do an Acupressure and Sports massage curriculum for the upper ranks.
 
Thanks, Iron Dog. I knew Steve LaBounty was into the healing aspect, but I didn't know what he required. Thanks for the resource as well.
 
I was not aware of any healing aspects to kenpo until I read this. I knew I got up for a reason this morning...

In fact, the only healing aspect of any martial art I've heard of is something related to systema, but I don't know enough to give details.
 
If you want to know more about systema, ask Gou.

I think that you usually go into healing after getting to know each and every one of your muscles the hard way :p And of course, having to recover later :D
 
I don't see Gou that often, but the next time he wanders into the dojo, I 'll ask him. I know that Roland also trains in systema up in Toronto. I've been asked to go up, but I'll be honest: as an orange belt, I think I'd just hold these black belts back in the class.

On systema: the CBC ran a bit on it on a children's programme awhile back. Gave it a really positive look. I think Gou was actually there when they taped.
 
There was a time when most kung-fu teachers were also well-versed in various field(s) of Chinese medical therapies. Many of them were actually physicians. So it was fairly typical for a kung-fu practicioner who wanted to become a teacher to learn one of the traditional medical therapies.

Sadly, this practice has fallen away in the last few generations...although Yilichuan still requires such training in advanced stages (it is actually required prior to application for senior examinations).
 
What Yilisifu says is correct. Many of the "old time" Sifu still know a bit about herbs, acupuncture and healing. It seems that the newer folks don't care for it as much, stating that they'll learn it at a later date. Many Japanese, Okinawan and Korean teachers do some form of healing or another still and require it from their upper students, though it's not as prevalent as it used to be. I know a little, save the traditional first aid, cpr, and such, but I know that the study of these arts makes me more introspective and respectful of what I am learning externally.
When I was in Kentucky, I got very sick at a get together. I was taken to an old lady and treated with "granny medicine" Worked, though I wretched for about 30 minutes. The "soup" she gave me afterwards was full of an herb called slippery elm and calmed my stomach and relaxed me instantly. I went to her for about everything for 2 weeks.
There is healing from every angle, not just M.A.
I.D.
 

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