Fighting strategy

Gerry Seymour

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Let's discuss a different strategy - lead your opponent into the emptiness, create an opening, and attack the opening.

- You throw a right jab. Your opponent uses right arm to block to his right (your left).
- Before your opponent's right arm contacts on your right arm, you pull your right jab back, and change it into a right hook.

I like the idea that you let your opponent to

- block into the thin air.
- open himself up by his own blocking.

Your thought?
This requires a good fake jab, an excellent ability to read the block (which must be an active block), and a strong ability to convert that jab into a hook with some power.

thats too much for me.
 

drop bear

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This requires a good fake jab, an excellent ability to read the block (which must be an active block), and a strong ability to convert that jab into a hook with some power.

thats too much for me.

Works better for knife fighting. Because theoretically they will cut at your hand.
 

punisher73

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Like others have pointed out "tactics" are the specific techniques you use on your opponent. The "strategy" is the overarching idea to support those tactics.

This is where many people get into trouble when trying to "mix" styles. Different styles may have a different strategy that doesn't blend with another strategy.

For example (in VERY general terms):
TKD's strategy is that the legs are stronger and longer so kicks are the best way to keep you safe in an attack. So, the tactics used would be on how to set up your kicks and keep the fight in kicking range.

BJJ's strategy is that the ground it a better place to subdue your opponent without the dangers of exchanging punches. So, the tactics used are how to safely close the distance, take the fight to the ground and get dominate position and submit your opponent.

Aikido's strategy is that they want the opponent to over commit and attack and then blend and take advantage of that. So, the tactics used are how to keep the fight at a safe distance that causes the opponent to reach and overcommit to an attack and then how to blend with it and submit the attacker.

I also think that this is one of the big disconnects between "sport" and "street" (and yes, I loathe to use those terms). In a sporting contest you are engaging your opponent to "win" under your contests rules. In the street, what is your goal? How does your strategy and tactics support that? For example, I don't always need to stand toe to toe with an opponent in a self-defense situation and beat him until he gives up. I might just need to cause quick damage to make my exit.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

Kung Fu Wang

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Let's talk about a different strategy.

- Your opponent throws jab and cross toward your head.
- You use left hook and right hook to "knock down" his punches (similar to downward parry).
- When you do that, your arms are on top and inside of his arms. You can then move in and attack his head.

When you opponent attacks you, instead of moving back, you attack him at the same time. You move both of your opponent's arms away from his head (he has no arm to guard his head), you then attack his head.

What's your opinion on this aggressive fighting strategy?
 

Gerry Seymour

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Let's talk about a different strategy.

- Your opponent throws jab and cross toward your head.
- You use left hook and right hook to "knock down" his punches (similar to downward parry).
- When you do that, your arms are on top and inside of his arms. You can then move in and attack his head.

When you opponent attacks you, instead of moving back, you attack him at the same time. You move both of your opponent's arms away from his head (he has no arm to guard his head), you then attack his head.

What's your opinion on this aggressive fighting strategy?
It seems workable against a weak striker. If Im picturing it right, it seems chancy if they are any good.
 

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