expert ?

GINGERNINJA

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At what rank belt or grade would you consider to be classed as an expert ?
I am 1st Dan but would no where near call my self an expert , in the U,K we have a saying you only really learn to drive a car after you have passed your driving test I feel the same way about my rank , dont get me wrong I am confident about my skill level n everything feels comfortable but I feel I have only really just begun my journey .
I know there is no standard answer for this , and opinion will vary from person to person ,
thanks
 

terryl965

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To me an expert is someone that has put in forty years and has devoted there life for the Arts. Lke you said so many people have a diferent approach toward this question.
 

Aikicomp

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At what rank belt or grade would you consider to be classed as an expert ?
I am 1st Dan but would no where near call my self an expert , in the U,K we have a saying you only really learn to drive a car after you have passed your driving test I feel the same way about my rank , dont get me wrong I am confident about my skill level n everything feels comfortable but I feel I have only really just begun my journey .
I know there is no standard answer for this , and opinion will vary from person to person ,
thanks

I know what you mean, my teacher used to tell me that when you made Shodan you were an expert at the basics which allowed you to actually start learning. I have been training for 27 years and am ranked Godan and by no means do I consider myself an expert, we all have good and bad days and there is always that "human" element that can screw things up for you. The key is to keep those "bad days and the "humaness" down to a bare minimum. I try to start each day with a clean slate and leave myself open to learn all I can. In this journey of life we can ALWAYS learn something from someone at sometime.

yours in Budo
Michael
 

seasoned

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I know what you mean, my teacher used to tell me that when you made Shodan you were an expert at the basics which allowed you to actually start learning. I have been training for 27 years and am ranked Godan and by no means do I consider myself an expert, we all have good and bad days and there is always that "human" element that can screw things up for you. The key is to keep those "bad days and the "humaness" down to a bare minimum. I try to start each day with a clean slate and leave myself open to learn all I can. In this journey of life we can ALWAYS learn something from someone at sometime.

yours in Budo
Michael
Being called expert or master really puts a strain on out training. I look to be as knowledgeable as I can, so as to pass down as much of the art as possible.:asian:
 

DMcHenry

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The more you know, the more you know you don't know.... so from my perspective I'll never be there. It's all relative on what/whom you are compared to. I guess experts are people who know much more than you do, and I'm always finding more of them. :)

The general public considers anyone with a "Black Belt" an expert.
 

morph4me

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If I'm discussing martial arts with people who know nothing about them, I'm the expert. If I'm discussing aikido with a karateka or a boxer, I'm the expert on aikido. If I'm discussing martial arts with a group of people who have been training and practicing martial arts, I'm just a guy in the discussion. In the valley of the blind, the one eyed man is king.
 

Drac

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In the academy class the Lead Instructor refers to me as their Martial Arts expert..I hate it as I am FAR from being and expert..I am just a student..
 

IMP

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It really all depends on what you consider an "expert". To someone who is just starting and has little or no knowledge in the martial art may see someone as an expert simply if they are their teacher. If you've had 5-10 years of experience, you know that an expert can be based on several things, such as an expert at basics, or an expert at kicking techniques. If you have a black belt or higher, you probably see an expert as someone who has a good 30 years or more of experience. If you are a full blown 8th degree black belt, you never aspire to be an expert, because there are still several things you can learn, even if you have perfected everything you do know.

My verdict: Experts only exist in one's mind, not in literal training.

Then again, this could be an energy-driven rant.
 

Gi1

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Interesting!

I like to think of myself as forever a student. I enjoy learning from others and myself and about myself in my Martial Arts.
 

Burnerbob

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Just my two cents.:) I have been involved in "Martial Arts" for over forty years and have trained with some of the greats. I feel that I am still learning everyday of my life, so I feel I am not an "Expert" just well seasoned.
 

astrobiologist

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I love the reply from Seasoned above. And I agree completely.

Forget the idea of 'expert'. Just train and share. You'll know respect for those who have deep knowledge whem you feel it. Using rank or length of training as a guideline is a flawed approach.
 

LuckyKBoxer

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The dictionary describes Expert as
a person who has extensive skill or knowledge in a particular field
That can be different depending on a curriculum the person is learning from. A Black Belt is generally thought of as an expert by any non martial arts practitioner. I would consider someone an expert in their given martial art when they get to the point they have learned all the curriculum, in my main art of American Kenpo that is 3rd Black. I consider a person who has spent their lives continuing to absorb, evolve, learn, and perfect their art one who has a degree of Mastery in the art.
 

Fuzzy Foot

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I would say the term expert refers to someone who has knowledge far above the lay person, in this case, non-martial artist. So to me if you did the work and it took you X number of years to achieve your black belt in a school that makes you earn it and not just put your time (and money) in, you're an expert. I think we can all agree that serious MA's consider themselves students for the duration and that there is always something to learn. This is true in many fields, medicine, engineering, manufacturing, personal development etc. There's nothing wrong with being humble or unassuming. In fact it's the smart play not to tip your hand. However some MA's in their head and self talk, often don't give themselves enough credit for their knowledge and achievements for fear of looking and sounding (even to themselves) like a brag or know-it-all. As we all know, there is always someone who knows more (and less) than we do and someone who can knock you on your butt. That does not diminish your knowledge or achievement. I bring this up because I believe it sometimes causes a confidence problem (in what they do know) with students and can affect performance. IMO you're an expert but your level of expertise may not be as high as someone more experienced and/or of higher rank. Sorry if I rambled.
 

grydth

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I don't know that rank plays a part in whether one is an "expert".

I have seen 2 individuals, one a fighter and one an Iaido instructor, whose ranks were 'only' Shodan. Yet the fighter on the mat far outclasses those who are ranks above him, and the Iaido teacher had been taught personally by the head of a major and honorable system. The relative low rank of these martial artists is no accurate reflection of their skills and experience.

Also consider areas such as Tai Chi, where there is little or no ranking in many systems. The only measure seems to be who knows their stuff... who understands the meaning behind it.... who can teach it?
 
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