Currently training boxing 5 times/week. Want to incorporate BJJ. Gi or No-Gi?

DFe

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Hi guys, I'm looking to start BJJ next week. I currently do boxing 5 times a week, and I want to swap 2 days of boxing for BJJ. My question is: should I do one day Gi and one day No-Gi? Or should I do two days Gi or two days No-Gi? Also, should the two BJJ training days be back-to-back or should I space them out between boxing training?

I know dedicating two days out of a week for BJJ training is not a lot, and I assume many will suggest doing BJJ more frequently. However, I am quite new to boxing as well (1 month in) and I want to gain progression in both striking and grappling so I figured combining both would be a good idea.

Again, I am a complete beginner to BJJ, and your input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 
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DFe

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What are your goals?
Just to be ready for a street fight at any time. I don't intend to go amateur or pro in either discipline but I'd like to get really good at fighting. I'm willing to take on training for years as I've grew a really strong interest for it.
 
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DFe

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Gi - winter time combat skill.
No Gi - summer time combat skill.

You will need both.
Should the one Gi session and one No Gi sesion be back-to-back or should I space them out between boxing training?
For example: [Tue: boxing, Wed: boxing, Thurs: boxing, Fri: Gi, Sat: No Gi] or [Tue: boxing, Wed: Gi, Thurs: boxing, Fri: No Gi, Sat: boxing]
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Should the one Gi session and one No Gi sesion be back-to-back or should I space them out between boxing training?
For example: [Tue: boxing, Wed: boxing, Thurs: boxing, Fri: Gi, Sat: No Gi] or [Tue: boxing, Wed: Gi, Thurs: boxing, Fri: No Gi, Sat: boxing]
I will suggest to start with no Gi first. The moment that you have built up your Gi dependency, it's difficult to switch to no Gi.

Wrestlers may have hard time to compete in Judo tournament. Judo guys have much harder time to compete in wrestling tournament (because the Gi dependency).

It's

- easy to switch from no Gi into Gi.
- difficult to switch from Gi to no Gi.
 
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DFe

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You need to learn the throwing skill first. You have to be able to take down your opponent before you can apply your ground skill.
Is this something taught at BJJ Gi or No Gi sessions? Or is that more judo?
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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If you've got no particular aspirations beyond protections, and both options fit within your schedule, I'd agree on no-gi at first. For both reasons - cheaper, and more reliable in a fight.

Essentially, there are throws/submissions that can only happen with a gi or strong jacket/collar you can grab. If the person you are fighting does not happen to have that on, they become less useful. The flip side is that you would need to learn how to defend against those when you are wearing a heavy jacket, but the likelihood you'll be against someone who knows how to utilize your jacket is low anyway.

I second Kung Fu Wangs point though - if you can, try to find a bjj place that teaches at least some takedown and takedown defense. A lot of sport bjj places will just start you in a position where both people are on their knees and just start rolling. I get the purpose of this, and for sport bjj it makes sense, but if you're only doing this you don't know how to fall safely, stop them from taking you down, or take them down without getting blasted first. If you can't find a place that teaches both, either learn bjj until you can find a wrestling place, or just go all in on boxing for a couple years.
 

Tony Dismukes

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The fundamental skills and concepts for gi and no-gi BJJ are the same, just some of the contextual applications change. So unless you have plans to compete in BJJ tournaments any time soon, I don't think it matters much. (If you do want to compete within your first year, then it will probably be better to pick one and stick with it.)

I agree with KFW and MTW that it is advantageous to find a school that spends time on takedowns. However there is a use case for just learning the ground fighting aspect if that is what your available school covers. Since you are already training boxing, that can be your primary fighting style, with the BJJ reserved for defending yourself if someone else takes you down in a fight. I personally prefer being able to integrate striking, clinching, takedowns, takedown defense, ground fighting, and standing up from the ground into one seamless system. But you have to work with whatever is available to you locally.

As to your second question, it may depend on factors beyond your control, i.e. the availability of classes. But if you have the choice, then I would alternate your training days of BJJ and boxing. The two arts put different stresses on your body, so alternating will improve your body's recovery capacity.
 

dunc

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Id add that no gi is easier on your body, especially if your cardio is good from boxing
However, if your academy has a lot of focus on leg locks in no gi then that may detract from your goals somewhat
Also Id choose one rather than alternating between gi and no gi as itll be kinda confusing until you get the fundamentals down
 

marvin8

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Just to be ready for a street fight at any time. I don't intend to go amateur or pro in either discipline but I'd like to get really good at fighting. I'm willing to take on training for years as I've grew a really strong interest for it.
Boxing is great. However, realize there are certain positions that may be vulnerable to knees, elbows, kicks and takedowns (which one may or may not face in the street)
  • Philly shell
  • Ducking (bending at the waist), etc.
Tritac-Jitsus approach to combat jiu-jitsu, which includes boxing and jiu-jitsu.

 

drop bear

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Boxing is great. However, realize there are certain positions that may be vulnerable to knees, elbows, kicks and takedowns (which one may or may not face in the street)
  • Philly shell
  • Ducking (bending at the waist), etc.
Tritac-Jitsus approach to combat jiu-jitsu, which includes boxing and jiu-jitsu.

I think the philly shell is bad for stuff has been disproved.

 

marvin8

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I think the philly shell is bad for stuff has been disproved.

Not disproved, it can be bad if you blade and lean back too much. Strickland is a good example of using boxing and the philly shell (may be modified from Mayweather) in open ruleswhile keeping more square, being aware of takedowns, kicks and checking them.

 

Oily Dragon

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The Philly Roll as it's known in boxing is ultimately a move to defend the head, it exposes the lower half and puts your weight behind you.

Ok boxing, it makes sense. Most of the time, Mayweather uses the shell to win by decision. It's designed to tire out the opponent and avoid head KOs at all costs but also points.

But every single one is an opening for a leg.

Which is why kung fu styles with the Philly Shell combine them with sprawls and squats. There's nothing about the shell that is limited to standing.
 

marvin8

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Muay Thai vs. Kickboxing: The Fight That Changed The World of Martial Arts:


MMA fighter VS Street fighter parking garage:

X9erFDT.gif
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Martinez invested even more into Yanez' lead leg, and eventually the boxer dropped to the floor. The referee had seen enough and called off the fight.

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Your opponent has to enter your kicking range before he can enter your punching range. Kicking should be your first line of defense.

If A and B are on the same level.

- A uses punch only.
- B uses kick only.

My bet will be on B because leg is longer/stronger than the arm.

In the long fist system, your legs do 70% of the job. Your hands only do 30% of the job.
 
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