Counter to the counter

I like this. Will be experimenting with it. Seems it could be a good way of preventing them from reaching your flank in the first place.
That is a wrestling demo. In open rules, the opponent can land a punch once their foot lands. (One way to prevent them from reaching your flank is better timing of your punch.)

Machida does the scoop throw by pulling, controlling the rear hand and better timing.

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It's too late. As you rotate, the opponent attacks you from their advantageous position.
I can rotate very quicker than amyone can attack from a supposedly advantageous angle. Im fast匈 float like a lepidoptera, and sting like a hymenoptera .
 
Interested to hear different takes on dealing with a specific situation, a very common one. You throw a high punch and your opponent moves forward/diagonally to your outside, right in that dead zone where we all like to move to so often. What are everyone's sort of "go to" responses when your opponent has flanked you like this and has all sorts of options open to them.

You just keep going. Its just a punched missed and an opponent repositioning. Unless were talking about a one step kumite drill. If we are that depends on the skills and experience of the people involved.
 
Footwork seems to be the key here?
Yes I think so.

I'm currently working specifically on improving my footwork, without putting too much strain on my back. I'm not jumping around, instead I try to step tactically and with a lower stance. I'm testing new ideas in each class. Ideally you bait the opponent into a counter, and then attack. I need to be more clever to compensate for reduce mobility. And so far the ideas seems to work reasonable well.
 
You just keep going. Its just a punched missed and an opponent repositioning. Unless were talking about a one step kumite drill. If we are that depends on the skills and experience of the people involved.
Definitely not talking one steps here.
 
As the opponent steps to the outside position, they can simultaneously attack preventing "being on the receiving end."

Slipping and simultaneously attacking is something I very much like. Slipping a right while shooting a punch to floating ribs/liver with my own right is another favorite. Timing the evasion and counter strike as one beat should be something we all train for.
 
Yes I think so.

I'm currently working specifically on improving my footwork, without putting too much strain on my back. I'm not jumping around, instead I try to step tactically and with a lower stance. I'm testing new ideas in each class. Ideally you bait the opponent into a counter, and then attack. I need to be more clever to compensate for reduce mobility. And so far the ideas seems to work reasonable well.
Lol me too. But I just don't like bouncing around. I'm lazy lol.
 
You just keep going. Its just a punched missed and an opponent repositioning. Unless were talking about a one step kumite drill. If we are that depends on the skills and experience of the people involved.
I can pivot and punch pretty quick....but if he's already repositioned he's hitting me before I can pivot and punch. So how to stop that from happening?
 
This is the problem OP is describing. Where they take the angle then you play catch up.


When you square up. He cuts the angle the other way and you are back to square one.
 
Its probably called something else now, but thats what we used to call one step kumite.
 
Are you talking like a spinning back kick? The style I've been training recently chambers the back kick in a way it can be thrown at very close range so seems like a good fit, will try it out.
Targeting the head with that rear leg crescent?
There must be stylistic differences since a back leg kick has a different anatomy for me. When I say spinning side kick in the context of someone stepping in, it is a very tight in kick that may or may not straighten all the way out, but the foot/body position is definitely side kick.

Yes, targeting the head with the crescent kick.
 
Is this video presented as a realistic option ...or as a parody of demonstrations of unrealistic responses to an absurdly overcommitted attack followed by an overly compliant (inactive) behavior by the "attacker"???
When you make 1 move, your opponent also makes 1 move. To use your hand to block on your opponent's punching arm elbow joint is realistic. the rest depends on your opponent's respond.



When he blocks his opponent's punch and then steps in, that's 2 moves. If when he blocks, his other hand also punches at the same time, that's 1 move.

1 is better than 1, 2.
 
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Is this video presented as a realistic option ...or as a parody of demonstrations of unrealistic responses to an absurdly overcommitted attack followed by an overly compliant (inactive) behavior by the "attacker"???
It is an example of an option in reply to Buka's "just keep going,"

First, you should try to create a safe entry before attacking. Then, you should defend or exit a bad position.
 
When you make 1 move, your opponent also makes 1 move. To use your hand to block on your opponent's punching arm elbow joint is realistic. the rest depends on your opponent's respond.

None of your replies directly address the OP. Above, your opponent has not flanked you. You both are in a 50/50 position.

When he blocks his opponent's punch and then steps in, that's 2 moves. If when he blocks, his other hand also punches at the same time, that's 1 move.


1 is better than 1, 2.
No, his step and parry is one move which both of you do. However, you start from a 50/50 position, while he is outflanked. He says you are open to a kick the way you step. geezer says it's "unrealistic to an absurdly overcommitted attack..."

From your 50/50 situation, you over parry then, pivot on the front foot (both of you do). Instead, your opponent can shift his weight to the left foot and punch you in the face.
 
The best advice I ever got about fighting was when he moves, you move.

And sure, you might get hit. He might get it, too. Probably why they call it fighting.
 
The best advice I ever got about fighting was when he moves, you move.
The danger of this approach can be you may fall into your opponent's trap. Your opponent makes a move to trigger your response. He then takes advantage on your respond. This way, he can direct a fight into a smaller set that he has better control over it. IMO, this approach is too risky and too conservative.

I prefer to guide my opponent into an area that I'm more familiar with than he does.

For example, if I can drag my opponent in circle, I don't have to worry about his punch/kick at that moment. I may only give him 3 options:

1. resist.
2. yield.
3. take control back.

Since I only have to deal with these 3 options, the fight can be simpler.

 
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