Chum Kiu 3rd section help

geezer

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Re: the stepping up section of chum kiu:

Chum kiu involves coordinated whole body motion. The stepping up is part of the footwork development process. When properly coordinated it devlops an addiitional skill of delivering power...with hands or foot.

Lots of applications can be discovered in that move.

joy chaudhuri

I think the bolded part of Joy's comment is the best answer to the OP's question, and it pretty much holds true for all the movements in the forms. Like Mook in his earlier post, I really hadn't thought much about this particular step until the question was asked. Then as I started pondering it, I began to see a lot of stuff there... and I'm sure there is a lot more that I'm not seeing. That depth is what makes WC forms so endlessly fascinating and useful. You can't reduce each movement to a simple self-defense application.
 
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izeqb

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It changes from lineage but the jut sau is an important part before the 'seal clapping'.

In our linage (one of leung ting students) we do the "seal-clapping" / "super-high-bong-sau" before the jut-sau...
 

geezer

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In our linage (one of leung ting students) we do the "seal-clapping" / "super-high-bong-sau" before the jut-sau...

If it comes from LT's WT then it would be a high double "man-sau" with the arms fully extended, the elbows straight and turned upward, with the hands turned "pinkie" upwards/thumb downwards. It is not a bent-arm bong sau. Using a bong sau to deflect a club is likely to get your arm broken! But I think we are actally saying the same thing... just using different terms.
 
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izeqb

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If it comes from LT's WT then it would be a high double "man-sau" with the arms fully extended, the elbows straight and turned upward, with the hands turned "pinkie" upwards/thumb downwards. It is not a bent-arm bong sau. Using a bong sau to deflect a club is likely to get your arm broken! But I think we are actally saying the same thing... just using different terms.

The term "high bong-sau" is just my way of describing it, in lack of the correct term :)

When you're referring to that movement as a high man-sau, do you mean "seeking/ asking hand"?

And what would be the benefit/reason of using your man-sau like that?
 

mook jong man

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The term "high bong-sau" is just my way of describing it, in lack of the correct term :)

When you're referring to that movement as a high man-sau, do you mean "seeking/ asking hand"?

And what would be the benefit/reason of using your man-sau like that?

I'm not LT lineage , but the reason for the Man Sau , if we take the example of the overhead club attack is that the force of the club will slide straight down the outside of the forearm where as if you tried a Bong Sau you would be taking the impact on one point and as Geezer said you'd get your arm broken.
 

yak sao

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The high man sau is what you get if bong sau is able to extend. Imagine pushing a branch out of the way and then letting it go to allow it to spring back. That is what your bong sau is doing. Bong sau is not a technique in and of itself, but a half technique....it wants to spring outward.
Also, in the BT form, there is the "side" man sau.
 

Domino

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In our linage (one of leung ting students) we do the "seal-clapping" / "super-high-bong-sau" before the jut-sau...

Yes I am familiar with that although not my lineage, horses for courses so to speak :)
 

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