Book by Kiyoshi Arakaki.

arnisador

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I saw the book The Secrets of Okinawan Karate: Essence and Techniques by Kiyoshi Arakaki in the bookstore today, I flipped through it and seemed to really compare and contrast, and explore the reasons for, the various techniques of Okinawan Karate. (Most books with 'secrets' in the title I consider highly suspect though I know the publishers may force it on an otherwise good book.) I found it interestung--an attempt tor eally discuss why one punches a certain way, what the benefits of a certain stance is, etc.--but I only skimmed it. Is anyone familiar with it and able to comment in more detail?
 
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Mike Clarke

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I was looking at that book last week in a book store but put it back on the shelf as I felt it was written for the 'American' market.

Mike.
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Mike Clarke
I was looking at that book last week in a book store but put it back on the shelf as I felt it was written for the 'American' market.

Mike.

I think I know what you mean by the "American" market.........I saw the book several months ago and found nothing "secret" or particularly outstanding about the book.
 
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arnisador

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Compared to most of what I see, I thought it was a cut above. He seemed to be making an effort to really explain the reasons why some things are done as they are rather than simply asserting that his way was the best. That's what caught my eye about it--reasons rather than assertions.

But, I only skimmed it and did not purchase it so I can't really say how much 'meat' there would have been if I had actually read it.

Thanks for the comments!
 
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Mike Clarke

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I think I might be sticking my head up here for a kick, [but], when I see titles like this one I can't help but read "Rip-off".
So many Westerners will go for anything a Japanese or Okinawan says that some can't resist the the opportunity.
The term "Dumbing Down" comes to mind.
I saw nothing that was 'secret' in the sense the title suggested and so I had to wonder why the word was used at all?
I've had book published and so I know what some publishers will get up to, but as the author you always have a say in the title of your book.
I have no doubts there is a market out there for this publication, and I'm just as sure it's for those under 18 years old.

Mike.
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Mike Clarke
I think I might be sticking my head up here for a kick, [but], when I see titles like this one I can't help but read "Rip-off".
So many Westerners will go for anything a Japanese or Okinawan says that some can't resist the the opportunity.
The term "Dumbing Down" comes to mind.
I saw nothing that was 'secret' in the sense the title suggested and so I had to wonder why the word was used at all?
I've had book published and so I know what some publishers will get up to, but as the author you always have a say in the title of your book.
I have no doubts there is a market out there for this publication, and I'm just as sure it's for those under 18 years old.

Mike.

Mike,

I think you hit the nail on the head.
Books that “secret” as part of the title always make me ask “why” is it secret.
Mark Bishop’s book on Okinawan Karate teachers styles and secret techniques was a very enlightening look at some of the masters in Okinawa but was by no means passing on any “secret” techniques.

Arakaki’s book didn’t have much in the way of informative info.
First off I saw a statement on a website of his that said it was on the top 10 list here in Japan………which it was/is not. I had never heard of him or his book until some other person brought it up on a discussion board.
It would seem he is playing “the race card” as many Asians do in the west.
It’s the “I am Asian, therefore I must know something” kind of thing.
Granted Westerners are just as guilty with the “He is Asian, therefore he must know something” attitude.
I have seen too many mediocre Asian MA people play that little game to the hilt and demand to be put on a pedestal by westerners.
 
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chufeng

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I know the REAL secret...



#1) Find a good teacher...


#2) Practice your a$$ off for many, many years...


Other than that, you won't find it in a pill, a book, or a videotape.

:asian:
chufeng
 
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Mike Clarke

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Ryu Shin Kan,
Marks Bishop's book had,as you pointed out, little or nothing in the way of 'secret' information as most people would think of the word. To some readers [like me] it did contane lots of information about people that I was unaware of until I'd read it, but was that info 'secret'? Hardly.
I agree that there is some traffic in using the race card in both directions, and that is why I believe it is so important not to sit at home and train only in ones comfort zone, but get out and train in Japan, Okinawa, or anywhere else that one might find strong and sincere martial arts being practised.

Chufeng,
I agree, but isn't it funny how the way to make progress is simple and yet so few seem to want to do it? If half the amount of effort went into training sincerley as goes into 'wanting titles', 'marketing', and 'building up ones martial arts business', the MA world would be full of real experts who knew how to live as well as how to fight.

Mike.
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Mike Clarke
I agree that there is some traffic in using the race card in both directions, and that is why I believe it is so important not to sit at home and train only in ones comfort zone, but get out and train in Japan, Okinawa, or anywhere else that one might find strong and sincere martial arts being practised.


Agreed.
 
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