As a beginner in boxing, what kinds of mistakes should I just accept that I will make?

MoldyCookie

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I'm having difficulty prioritizing what I should be working on fixing as soon as possible and what I should accept will go away over time.
 

JowGaWolf

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I'm having difficulty prioritizing what I should be working on fixing as soon as possible and what I should accept will go away over time.
Step 1 - Learn the beginner stuff and keep training until you are good at the beginner stuff
Step 2 - After you get good with the beginner stuff keep training it until you are excellent at the beginner stuff
Step 3 - Once you are an expert at the beginner stuff, keep training it so you don't forget the beginner stuff.

I hope this helps. It doesn't sound like much, but you can see professional athletes screw up on beginner stuff all the times and when they do, it often has the biggest impact on the team at that moment.

As for your mistakes. Accept them all. The mistakes don't really go away. They just happen less frequently. Again look at the mistakes that are made in professional sports. It happens. Accept it as a norm and just keep training. Also learn from the mistakes. The same mistake will often happen more than once but not for the same reason.
 

Damien

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I agree with @JowGaWolf but to add something else to the mix. Prioritise fixing defensive mistakes. If your punch isn't as powerful as it could be, not the end of the world. If your head is constantly leant forwards, or your hands or down or you aren't good at moving on your feet, then you have problems. Getting hit is what ends the fight for you, get that right first (in the context of hitting things of course), then focus on improving the hitting.
 

Buka

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Most important, have fun. Seriously. Just go to the gym and listen to your trainer(s).

Build a strong foundation - chin down, elbows in (next to your ribs) hands up at all times, feet shoulder width apart.

If you cant reach somebody with your left jab, youre not going to be able to reach them with a right hand.

Hook punches need to be short, weight on your back foot.

Youre going to get countered with a surprise left hook when you move in towards somebody.

At some point youre going to slightly bounce off the middle of the ropes and not see the uppercut thats going to raise your head.right into another front hand hook.

Youre going to learn that being in the corner can really suck.

I think one of the most difficult things to grasp is - you get pretty good. Youre fast. You spar with somebody whos not close to you in speed. But he has far better timing. It will likely be the longest, most frustrating day youve experienced until that point. Timing beats speed.

The first time you spar with an experienced counter fighter youll feel like youre sleepwalking. It will suck, but dont let it bother you, this too will pass.

We could go on and on, but no need, that's what training is for. There ain't no shortcuts.

One of the things you can do at the gym, when you're done with your workout - if there's a good fighter there that's sparring, study him. Study everything about him.

But have fun, brother. It gets better and better as you learn. (Thank God) :)
 

drop bear

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Your structure and composure are two very important elements.

So don't turn your head when you get punched and don't reach when you are trying to punch someone else.
 
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