Arab Scimiter...........Relative to the Chinnese Broadsword

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Cobra

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I've just baught an scimiter, and it seams to me it is very identical to a Chinnese Broadsword. The only difference I see is that at midpoint in the blade there is a big vertical curve. But other than that, it seems a lot alike. Did the Chinnese Broadsword come from the Arab Scimiter or vice versa?

Also, which sword would be better in a fight to you guys?
 

arnisador

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I don't know of any connection between the two...but, stranger things have happened. The kukhri was influenced by Roman weapons, for example.
 

Walter Wong

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The middle eastern swords that are curved and broad bladed do look like Chinese Broadswords/Sabers. Well, the middle east is close to China. I wouldn't doubt that the Arab Scimitar or like blade in ancient times was brought to China or vice versa resulting in a similar design.

I train Chinese Broadsword/Saber. So naturally I would choose to use that blade since I don't know Arab Scimiter techniques. If I had a Arab Scimiter in my hands I'd likely use it as a Chinese Broadsword with Chinese techiques with Chinese grappling for inclose situations.
 

arnisador

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Does anyone still teach scimitar techniques? In the Mid-East, even? I've never heard of someone who currently studies this weapon.
 

tellner

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So much depends on what you mean by "scimitar". There are only so many ways to make a curved cutting sword. The shamshir and kilij don't look much like Chinese broadswords at all. They have more in common with various Indian swords. Not surprising since the Moghuls were in India for a very long time. Some of the influence might be because of the Mongols. The basic curved Central Asian sword travelled from China to Hungary to Egypt with the horse nomads.
 

Flying Crane

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arnisador said:
Does anyone still teach scimitar techniques? In the Mid-East, even? I've never heard of someone who currently studies this weapon.

I had an archaeology professor in college who grew up in India. He studied something, I believe it was a "scimitar" like weapon, curved blade, at least, not sure if it was actually the same weapon.
 

tellner

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Several Indian martial arts include the use of the curved sword. There are still people out there who teach the shamshir. The really hard part is finding someone who teaches the whole program like fighting from horseback.
 

arnisador

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I would imagine that's rare! Archery from horseback is still done ine Japan, I know, but not by many.
 
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dasgregorian

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Chinese broad swords tend to be a much thinner metal, and a shorter blade but a very similar shape to an arabian falchion. Scimitars are, again thicker metal, thinner blade (from cutting edge to the 'back' of the sword).

As far as if one was influenced by the other... I don't really don't think so. I BELIEVE the arabian swords came around first, but the chinese are very well known for just making up crazy looking weapons out of no where (look at all the varients of hook swords and fighting rings, etc.) So, I'll assume they thought of the curved blade idea themselves. (the reason they use a curved blade as opposed to a flat one like almost all european weapons is for chopping... curved weapons are generally inferior for thrusts, but is much better for chopping ergonomically... During a circular swing, once you make contact you drag the blade across your target, giving you a better cut).
 

OULobo

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I think the blade everyone is refering to is usually called a talwar and it is common throughout the middle east and into india. My personal opinion is that they blades evolved seperately, but maybe for the same reason, like the aformentioned cavalry connection or the ability to easier wear it with the flowing robes common in the areas where they were found.
 

Wes Tasker

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You can still find some sword techniques preserved in the "sword dances" practiced in Lebanon and Iran. The Shamshir (farsi) or Saif (arabic) are used. There were some good threads on that on the Middle Eastern Swords section on www.swordforum.com

-wes
 
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