age and the martial arts

Tez3

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Ok cards on table. How old are you two? Im 50.
69 in November, though it's considered rude to ask a lady her age. 😂
I've fifty odd (very odd quite often) years in martial arts, as well as horse riding and did parachuting as a hobby years ago. All adds to the stress on joints and back.
 

Wing Woo Gar

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69 in November, though it's considered rude to ask a lady her age. 😂
I've fifty odd (very odd quite often) years in martial arts, as well as horse riding and did parachuting as a hobby years ago. All adds to the stress on joints and back.
I apologize. I just wonder who I’m talking to sometimes.
 

drop bear

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I mean the average life (career life) of a professional MT Fighter is 18 months to a few years (At most) - Yes there are exceptions.
Or at least those were the states I had a decade ago when I did research on that topic for myself

Wait what?
 

Steve

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Maybe zero.

Bionics and cybernetic organisms are slightly different things, but many modern brainiacs are making the argument that most humans are already cybernetic, because of the convergence of humans with hand held smartphones.

I dig this theory, because there's definitely some sort of psychic link between people and their phones. Can't put em down, we get anxiety when we can't find ours, and in a lot of ways they are constantly looping feedback, even to the point of altering physical senses and consiousness.

Honestly it's the most fascinating subject next to Kung Fu and gourmet cooking for me. How and when did the wall between man and machine break down? We are now a globe of computer dependent humans, but not in the same way of even 20 years ago. Today it's a far more intimate pairing. Good thing? Bad? Probably a lot of both.

Keep in mind, I'm just a cook who reads a lot.
Maybe. I think I’d do just fine as long as there’s a crossword book in the bathroom.
 

isshinryuronin

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there's definitely some sort of psychic link between people and their phones. Can't put em down, we get anxiety when we can't find ours
It's not so much of a link as a habitual dependence. A dependence of approval by others on social media by getting "likes" (and I'm somewhat ashamed to say it pleases me, as well; that I am not immune to the lure of ego.) By the feeling that others are interested in photos of what you had for dinner, or what cute thing your cat is doing every day. This is the hook, the "high" that ensnares. The need for approval. By giving up our emotional self-reliance.

We delegate too much to various apps, such as not having to know how to spell. We sacrifice the more intimate and nuanced ways of personal communication, depending on premade emojis to express emotions and thoughts rather than spontaneous and natural feelings that voice and visual cues can better express. Emoji cards are now used by autistic kids who are unable to communicate their feelings. I'm sure if they had a choice they would rather not be dependent on them.

Like a blind person without their cane or seeing-eye dog, we find ourselves inadequate without our phones.

Delegating tasks is fine, until we find we've delegated too much of our ability to live happily within ourselves.
We are inconvenienced if we lose tools such as a screwdriver or can-opener, but lose our phone? Psychotic meltdown for some. These people need to spend a few weeks in the desert, mountains or woods and find the satisfaction, harmony and reliance within themselves. Phones are a tool to be used, not a substitution for our own humanity.

Like martial art skills, smart phones are good when really needed, but bad when overused.

Yes, I do have a cell phone and use it primarily to phone when on the road (rarely). My laptop at home serves my other few needs (like occasionally oversharing as I'm doing now). Seldom to never do I find myself at a loss when away from my "smart" electronics. But then, again, I grew up and developed in an age before home computers were invented.
 

_Simon_

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It's not so much of a link as a habitual dependence. A dependence of approval by others on social media by getting "likes" (and I'm somewhat ashamed to say it pleases me, as well; that I am not immune to the lure of ego.) By the feeling that others are interested in photos of what you had for dinner, or what cute thing your cat is doing every day. This is the hook, the "high" that ensnares. The need for approval. By giving up our emotional self-reliance.

We delegate too much to various apps, such as not having to know how to spell. We sacrifice the more intimate and nuanced ways of personal communication, depending on premade emojis to express emotions and thoughts rather than spontaneous and natural feelings that voice and visual cues can better express. Emoji cards are now used by autistic kids who are unable to communicate their feelings. I'm sure if they had a choice they would rather not be dependent on them.

Like a blind person without their cane or seeing-eye dog, we find ourselves inadequate without our phones.

Delegating tasks is fine, until we find we've delegated too much of our ability to live happily within ourselves.
We are inconvenienced if we lose tools such as a screwdriver or can-opener, but lose our phone? Psychotic meltdown for some. These people need to spend a few weeks in the desert, mountains or woods and find the satisfaction, harmony and reliance within themselves. Phones are a tool to be used, not a substitution for our own humanity.

Like martial art skills, smart phones are good when really needed, but bad when overused.

Yes, I do have a cell phone and use it primarily to phone when on the road (rarely). My laptop at home serves my other few needs (like occasionally oversharing as I'm doing now). Seldom to never do I find myself at a loss when away from my "smart" electronics. But then, again, I grew up and developed in an age before home computers were invented.
I clicked "agree" as I agree 100%, but I can change it to "disagree" if it helps the cause!

🤣
 

Rich Parsons

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Wait what?
Ok, I guess I was wrong.

It says they start at 8 on average 7 to 9 and go 21 to 22 years years old.
So these top of the sport fighters are done by the early twenties.
Which would be about 3 to 4 years as an adult (* From a US point of view *)
Yes the kids fight and yes there are bets on them. Per the articles I just browsed.
 

Tony Dismukes

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Ok, I guess I was wrong.

It says they start at 8 on average 7 to 9 and go 21 to 22 years years old.
So these top of the sport fighters are done by the early twenties.
Which would be about 3 to 4 years as an adult (* From a US point of view *)
Yes the kids fight and yes there are bets on them. Per the articles I just browsed.
That sounds more in line with my understanding. Most MT fighters start out as children and compete through early adulthood. So maybe around ten years before they reach 18 and a few more years after that.

On the other hand you do have guys like Saenchai who is 41 and has been fighting for 24 years now.
 

drop bear

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That sounds more in line with my understanding. Most MT fighters start out as children and compete through early adulthood. So maybe around ten years before they reach 18 and a few more years after that.

On the other hand you do have guys like Saenchai who is 41 and has been fighting for 24 years now.

Wayne parr just recently finished his career as well.
 
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