Why don't Kyokushin practitioners bulk up a little bit?

Discussion in 'Karate' started by 666, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. 666

    666 Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Ah, now it makes sense, the water must have been damn cold, even if you're conditioned.
     
  2. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    186
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Location:
    Geelong, Victoria, Australia
    Ah that is hardcore, I think it's good every now and then to really go to extremes like that. Just not all the time haha..

    As to whether Oyama recommended weight training I'm not 100% sure, haven't read the books (which I'd love to though..). It was only spoken about rarely during training, but moreso functional strength and core development stuff. When I trained Kyokushin I weight trained, still do and love it, but yeah there are plenty of smaller fighters who pack an incredible punch. Hit someone in the right spot, with great technique and with the right timing and it won't matter how strong he is hehe, he will feel it! In some respects power comes from technique (but yeah, now we're getting into many differing topics, power vs strength vs mass etc), but weights can definitely assist in that.

    I guess it's a matter of not leaning too much to either extreme (ie. [1] one should devote an incredible amount of time to weights to the exclusion of other aspects vs. [2] weight training is useless). I keep coming back to the idea of balance. And sometimes there are times when you need to devote more time to develop certain skills/strengths, but it's all in the name of bringing about a greater balance.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. 666

    666 Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yoooo, got myself "This is Karate" and there he basically says the same thing, younger people should focus more on strength and speed and not so much on technique. "and devote yourself to achieving precision in the basic techniques only". Well you don't really need more so yeah,... at the end you'll still need all three things.
     
  4. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,157
    Likes Received:
    4,249
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    I’m not sure Ibelieve this. I mean, it sounds plausible and all, but Joe Lewis wasn’t keeping the car warm for you guys, and you didn’t go out and eat a stack of pancakes afterward. Doesn’t sound like one of your stories. :p
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  5. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Black Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Messages:
    580
    Likes Received:
    186
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Location:
    Geelong, Victoria, Australia
    Ah that's interesting, thanks for sharing, am keen to get that book if i can find it cheaper...

    Glad the basic techniques bit was added! I guess technique becomes far more important in older years, but while you're young other aspects can be given attention. But yeah that doesn't preclude technique for sure
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. 666

    666 Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yes, that's exactly what he says, I quote: "as you grow older your body's strength and speed will decline, and that will be the time when techniques will be important."
    Next sentence should also be worth mentioning:
    "If, when you are young, you concentrate only on techniques to the neglect of strength and speed, you will be running up a blind alley."
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour Sr. Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    15,157
    Likes Received:
    4,249
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Some real wisdom in that - we now know that muscles, once developed, are easier to maintain and to rebuild after atrophy. Developing strength in youth means it’s easier to maintain strength as we age.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. hoshin1600

    hoshin1600 Senior Master

    Joined:
    May 16, 2014
    Messages:
    2,512
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Trophy Points:
    253
    so as it turns out Joe was a very smart man..he was at home sitting on the couch in front of the fireplace while the screaming banshee's were in the car waiting for their limbs to work again so they could drive home.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. GreatUniter

    GreatUniter Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2018
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    23
    All great japanese masters trained with weights (some of them that are alive still train). Kiyohide Shinjo, Morio Higaonna, Masahiko Kimura, Mas Oyama etc.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Psilent Knight

    Psilent Knight Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    39
    Trophy Points:
    28
    @666 There are literally thousands, maybe even hundreds of thousands of Kyokushin practitioners world wide. The ones you have seen (in person or on screen) are only but a small sample of Kyokushin students there is. Most of the Kyokushin enthusiasts that I know are really into weight lifting and quite a few of them are intimidating with their size and physiques. Also have you ever seen Judd Reid or Nicholas Pettis in their competition days? How about Arne Soldwedel or Ketustis Arbocious? There's Kenji Yamaki and hundreds more.

    No, "This Is Karate" was never updated and reprinted. I believe you are thinking about Sosai's first book "What Is Karate?". The updated version of that book is titled "Mastering Karate".

    The third one is "Advanced Karate".
     
    • Informative Informative x 1

Share This Page