why belt test?

Discussion in 'Krav Maga' started by Thisposthuman, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. Thisposthuman

    Thisposthuman White Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Texas
    I have been studying Krav Maga for just over a year and have never done a belt test. My instructors never push it on me and it hasnt held me back in training but I am the only one of my peers, whom i started with, who isnt going for belts. I wanted to throw this out there to the krav community of why you all think it is or is not important.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    9,639
    Likes Received:
    2,795
    Trophy Points:
    403
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    I'm not part of the Krav community, but I'll toss in my few cents' worth.

    Belts/ranks are only as useful as an instructor makes them. Tests have an inherent value if they are testing for a useful quality (and "useful" is very contextual).

    So, in my program, a student doesn't really have a choice of whether to test or not - because those tests are a tool for me to use in teaching them. Nor whether to wear the next rank or not - because those ranks are useful when interacting with students who don't know them (it tells others in the art what techniques they are likely to know, for instance).

    But that could have gone another way. I considered not having ranks or testing when I formed my curriculum. If I didn't have ranks and tests, I'd use other tools (probably actually still periodic tests, now that I think about it).

    So, to me, it comes down to this: if ranks and tests are something your instructor uses, you should probably participate. They can be (aren't always - it depends upon the instructor, mostly) useful, and when they are used well, not participating in them can become a problem for others.
     
  3. wab25

    wab25 White Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2017
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    If you read these forums, and other martial arts forums, you can find countless reasons instructors use belt tests. Most of those reasons are valid. Some you might actually agree with. But it breaks down to this. How your instructor, deals with belts and belt tests, is part of how he teaches his art. He does it in a particular way, for his reasons. If you like what he is teaching, and how he is teaching it, enough to regularly attend class... you should take part in all the training opportunities he provides.

    Some instructors test, some don't, there are various numbers of belts and sometimes different requirements, written exams and so forth. These are part of how each instructor teaches his art. Its kind of like saying: I'll do your drills, learn your kicks, learn your blocks... but I won't learn your punches.

    I am one of those guys that doesn't really care what funny color my belt is. I only care for the learning new stuff part and the getting better I what I think I know part. I got to the point where I really didn't care about the testing or the funny colors, so much so that I now wear whatever colors my instructors want me to wear. If they want me to take a test, then it is part of how that instructor wants to pass on his art. If I have decided that a particular instructor has what I want, then I take the tests and wear the colors he wants me to, just like I do the stretches, the push ups, the forms, katas, drills, sparring, situational awareness, punches, kicks and other techniques he asks me too. Its all part of the instructors way of transmitting his art to me.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Thisposthuman

    Thisposthuman White Belt

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Texas
    I share your sentiment toward the belts. We do not have uniforms and no one wears belts during training, so it really doesnt matter. The instructors know everyone by name and how long they have been there except for the people in their first couple of weeks. At our school, you start at beginner class but everything beyond that is by invite only. Essentially the instructor makes a case by case judgement on what you can handle and thats how you move up into more advanced training. There are classes on MT, boxing, jiu jitsu...if you go through "level 1" classes enough times and the instructor thinks you can defend yourself well enough not to get hurt in a higher level, they will invite you...all that said, I am in for self defense period, i really couldnt care less about rank as long as it doesnt bar me from participation in advanced training. I could see, that if i change schools it could be hars for me to prove on paper my capabilities.
     
  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    9,639
    Likes Received:
    2,795
    Trophy Points:
    403
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Just a note - the way they are using "levels" is similar to how many places use ranks. They aren't something grandiose, just a way of designating someone is ready for the next "stuff". The belt is a visual way of recognizing these different levels in a mixed group.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. JR 137

    JR 137 Master of Arts

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    868
    Trophy Points:
    318
    Location:
    In the dojo
    Substitute "level 1, 2, 3... for "belt 1, 2,3..." or "white belt, blue belt, yellow belt..." and there's no difference IMO. It's the nonsense stuff that people attach to them that can make them absurd.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    12,957
    Likes Received:
    2,564
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Ok. here is the concept.

    Training for specific concepts forces you to focus on areas of your martial arts that you may be avoiding.

    So if I am a red hot striker i may not need to be very good at takedown. Which is cool.

    But to get good at takedowns I would need to isolate that and just do wrestling. This will make me more well rounded and ultimately a better martial artist.

    In the same way a belt test will force you to focus on a syllabus whether it is your go to game or not. And will like these situational exercises force you to become a better martial artist.

    So ultimately you use these belts as a progressive learning tool.

    In the same way if you Krav. You should also box kickbox or grapple.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  8. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    9,639
    Likes Received:
    2,795
    Trophy Points:
    403
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Well said, DB.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    12,957
    Likes Received:
    2,564
    Trophy Points:
    263
    You get it enough monkeys on enough typewriters and all that.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  10. Finlay

    Finlay Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2016
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Jakarta
    It's about the test, not the grade
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. JR 137

    JR 137 Master of Arts

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    868
    Trophy Points:
    318
    Location:
    In the dojo
    I love the test. I get pushed hard and am taken out of my comfort zone. The promotion doesn’t matter much to me nowadays.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page