Usefullness of sparring

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by watching, Mar 24, 2018.

  1. TMA17

    TMA17 Black Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    58
    I'd add that it depends on how you spar too. Going at it hard is bad for the brain. Sparring gives timing, distance control and some sense of what it's like to be hit.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    No, getting hit a lot is bad for the brain, but Hitting others does you no Harm e at all, well maybe a bruised thumb, but you can live with that
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    You always turn the discussion into a discussion about you, I'm sure your are diligent and realistic about what you teach, but that is not universally true, fighting multiple attacker on the times I've done it, is dependent on not stopping moving, it's a significant advantage to attack rather than defend, and it's a great help if you can put paid to the guy in a few seconds, once you engage in a wrestling match with one, your finished
     
  4. TMA17

    TMA17 Black Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2017
    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    175
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Yeah and when you spar hard you get hit a lot unless it's very one sided.
     
  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    23,048
    Likes Received:
    6,827
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Um, the discussion WAS about me - you asked a question about my teaching. Was I supposed to reply with a reference to someone else? How would that address your question?

    I agree not everyone teaches multiples well. Some seem to actually believe they and their students become invincible badasses who cannot be touched by fewer than 5 people. Of course, if they did some homework - even just an honest review of Youtube videos - they'd quickly learn that's not quite true.

    And thanks for the input. Those are the tenets I try to hold to. As someone who is primarily a grappler, I had to learn that most grappling isn't useful there. If I get a great opening to put them down, I'll take it, but most of those openings seem to be for punches (not kicks so much, because gotta keep moving). The real focus of the training is your first point: keep moving. That's the part that gives you a chance. Without it, you'll only survive if they are lazy or just nice blokes.
     
  6. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    Well that's bad technique, then, the idea is NOT to get hit, anybody can gets punched repeatedly on the nose, it takes no skill at all
     
  7. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    23,048
    Likes Received:
    6,827
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    Depends the size of the nose, really, and whether your opponent is capable of consistently hitting a target that size.
     
  8. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    It's takes skill to punch a nose, but non at all to get punched.

    People talking like getting punched in the head repeatedly, is an inevitable part of sparring The very first skill you need to learn, is not getting punched, at all preferably , but only to land a much hardEr shot of you are
     
  9. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    23,048
    Likes Received:
    6,827
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    It takes skill in finding someone who can punch you.

    And I agree that not all hard sparring will result in head trauma. In fact, if both people are good at protecting their heads, it could be counter-productive to keep banging at each others' guards. Of course, much of the time, at least one of you is going to get his bell rung if you are both going hard.
     
  10. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Messages:
    2,217
    Likes Received:
    958
    Trophy Points:
    253
    Location:
    Australia
    I would say actually that there is something about getting hit, mentally it's pretty important getting used to that, and it almost is a skill in a sense, moreso a learned adaption. Obviously not constantly getting hit to the head in your training, but being able to get used to the shock of being hit (which in a fight may very well happen) can help override the need to curl up in fetal position and keep moving etc.

    But absolutely it's important training to not get hit as a first rule!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    23,048
    Likes Received:
    6,827
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    From a self-defense perspective, getting past the shock of getting hit might actually be the most valuable part of sparring. Second to that is getting over the shock of an unending attack (so it doesn't become an overwhelming attack). Third is learning to apply some of your techniques under some variation of full resistance.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  12. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    Hmm, not sure if go that far, certainly being hit if your not used to being hit might have you freeze, and that's not really a good thing, but to take it further and Sugest that you should be punched In the head to trigger an adaption) as the guy above did) is taking it to far, there No adaption caused by being punched, you don't get better at being punched by being punched. NoR does getting over the shock of being punched require you to be punched in the head, the chest will do just fine and the chest with a pad in place works well.

    That said, spirited Sparringg or even flow drills with real punched will inevitably lead to you being hit, That's good only in respect that it out a degree of jeopardy in the drill, and really all Drills should have a degree of jeopardy involved to encourage quick learning/ enfort. I do Push ups over a muddy puddle, it great at encouraging you not to give up and fall to the ground, just as practising balance on a 8 ft fence is much better than doing so on a 3ft fence. but that's no where near as good as practising on a fallen tree across a 5foot deep freezing cold stream, that really focusess the mind

    Learning though discomfort is good, but what you are Learning is to avoid the discomforT. The discomfort isn't the learning, unless you like lying in a muddy puddle it being punched
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
  13. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

    Top Poster Of Month

    • Supporting Member
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    23,048
    Likes Received:
    6,827
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Hendersonville, NC
    I'm not sure getting punched in the chest works for overcoming fear of being hit in the head. Note that I'm not talking about getting clobbered. Regular moderate sparring will end up with everyone eventually taking the occasional shot to the head, and that's plenty for getting past that shock reaction.

    I shoulda read that before I started typing my reply. That was basically my point.

    Yes.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    18,062
    Likes Received:
    4,437
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Getting past the shock of the dynamics being different to drills factor in there pretty heavily.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    18,062
    Likes Received:
    4,437
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Have you ever face punched a kuyokashin guy?
     
  16. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    18,062
    Likes Received:
    4,437
    Trophy Points:
    308
    Not really.
    Good punching defence is not the same as avoiding punches at all cost.

    Which is a reaction that generally screws people up.
     
  17. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    What is the cost of not getting punched at all, it's sounds like a good out come to me, if I can also avoid getting kicked throttled or thrown through the air, it sounds like a A good night out to me
     
  18. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2014
    Messages:
    18,062
    Likes Received:
    4,437
    Trophy Points:
    308
    You get punched more. Because your structure goes to pot.

    And the punches do more damage.
     
  19. jobo

    jobo Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2017
    Messages:
    6,917
    Likes Received:
    1,019
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Manchester UK
    No if I avoid punches (at all cost,) I don't get punched, if I get punched I clearly haven't managed to avoid them
     
  20. JR 137

    JR 137 Grandmaster

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2015
    Messages:
    5,011
    Likes Received:
    3,074
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    In the dojo
    I was a CPR instructor for quite a few years. Never had to perform it other than on a mannequin. Does that mean I shouldn’t have taught the class?

    I had two students successfully use the skills I taught them afterwards.

    Edit: I’ve also had people in my class who’ve performed CPR before taking my class - recertifying lifeguards, EMS, etc.123
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page