Two forms

Discussion in 'Korean Martial Arts - General' started by IcemanSK, Mar 17, 2006.

  1. IcemanSK

    IcemanSK El Conquistador nim!

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    *Bump*

    In the 1 1/2 years since I wrote this thread, I've realized a few things. I've since run into many TSD & a few Shotokan folks who do Bassai as I have learned it. I've yet to run into anyone outside the USCDKA who does Yumbee.

    I'm facinated by Last Fearner's words that the old ITF Encyclopedia has both forms in it. I'd be curious if anyone has done them.
     
  2. crushing

    crushing Grandmaster

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    Yum-be (Empi) is one of the required forms when testing for 2nd Dan in my TKD organization. Maybe the fact that each of our organizations does it is because of the connection between our GMs in CDKTDK? I haven't been introduced to Yum-be yet, that won't happen until I've become much better at Keumgang, which I just started last week.
     
  3. Laurentkd

    Laurentkd Master Black Belt

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    Which Bassai do you do, Bassai Dai or Bassai Sho? Sorry if you made this clear in an earlier post, I can't find it.
    And really this question could go to anyone. Is one more popular than the other for TKD schools?
     
  4. terryl965

    terryl965 <center><font size="2"><B>Martial Talk Ultimate<BR

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    For me it is Bassai Dai
     
  5. e ship yuk

    e ship yuk Yellow Belt

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    I know Yun-be, though we do it slightly different than most people. We originally descended from a Chung Do Kwan lineage, through Jhoon Rhee, doing the older forms - Pyong-an, Pal-sek (Bassai), Chul-gi (Naihanchi), etc. Our group, back a couple of generations, fell in with a group of Japanese tournament practitioners, so we tended to look very Japanese in our movements, though we still called it tae kwon do. Recently, my instructor chose to move more towards the Korean end of the spectrum, and we now are essentially tang soo do. Though we still look a little Japanese. :)

    Bassai - was still a brown belt at the time... man, does it show.
    Yun-be - practicing Yun-be with my instructor. Very slow performance, basically walking through every step.
     
  6. rmclain

    rmclain Black Belt

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    In the Chayon-Ryu system, we learn and practice both Yun-bee and Bassai Tae (and Bassai So).

    R. McLain
     
  7. IcemanSK

    IcemanSK El Conquistador nim!

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    In answer to Master Lauren's question, I only know it as Bassai. I'm not sure which one it is. If it helps, it's the one that starts with one hand closed the other covering it...then you lean forward & throw a supported backfist in a cross-legged stance.

    I've grown to appreciate Bassai a great deal. It's a fun form.
     
  8. IcemanSK

    IcemanSK El Conquistador nim!

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    I just bought Hillson's "Taekwondo Classic Forms" & "Korean Karate" by Son, Duk Song. Hillson's book has the Japanese, Korean & Chinese names for the same forms. I now know that the form that we do is Bassai Dai (Pal Sek in Korean).

    In GM Son's book, he says that Pal Sek is to be done in 45 seconds. I had not heard there was a timeframe in which to do it. Has anyone kept that tradition?

    My GM says that there is a 35 second timeframe in which to do Yum Bi (Yun Bi). Does anyone else have that in their tradition?
     
  9. Master-Theophylus

    Master-Theophylus White Belt

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    Yun bi is an oooooooooold school form that's been pretty much forgotten. Us who still hold strong to Chung do Kwan roots still know it. In shotokon they call it enpi (or empi) and it's slightly different. Either way, the 35 second rule is a US Chung do Kwan thing. I preferably like to train slower, and refine the techniques before I try to beat the clock on a form. Otherwise you rush it and everyone watching can see how ridiculous you look. Has anybody else seen "yum bee" videos online? Makes me want to cry.
     
  10. kitkatninja

    kitkatninja Green Belt

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    I do Tang Soo Do (with a Shotokan background) with an independent TSD association but which is a member of the WDSDU. We do Bassai (which is Bassai Dai in Shotokan) as well as Yum Bee (also known as Empi or Wanshu).

    I've seen some on youtube; agree with you there...
     
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