Try this drill

Discussion in 'Tae-Kwon-Do' started by Earl Weiss, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Like all drills it concentrates on a specific thing and should be viewed as something to build upon. Read description below the drill. I hope your students like it.

    Ok, so the description did not post - Here it is: Try this . When you are in a certain stance relative to the opponent you may do a quick switch. When you do that the opponent may or may not switch as well. Target holder is the opponent and they present the target as the switch stops. However the target is presented dictates the kick that must follow the switch. A rear leg side turning kick if target is to open stance side, another switch and rear leg side turning kick if target is to closed stance side and a Back piercing kick if target is presented straight ahead.
     
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  2. skribs

    skribs Grandmaster

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    The big flaw I notice is that you're not only kicking where his guard is, he's also got a thick shield of armor there. His head is exposed. You might have much more success if you were to go for a headshot. :p
     
  3. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Like I state above the video "Like all drills it concentrates on a specific thing and should be viewed as something to build upon."
    As performed in the video it actually violates what I consider a fundamentally flawed sparring strategy which is to always use combinations and never initiate a combination with the rear leg. The purpose of this drill is to concentrate on positioning after the switch to facilitate an attack to either side. If you don't do this and re only thinking of turning forward for a rear leg side turning kick the then transition to the back piercing kick is difficult. Shield level can be anywhere from a leg kick to a head kick. Rear leg Kicks can be preceded and or followed by hand techniques - but not the point of this drill.
     
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  4. skribs

    skribs Grandmaster

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    My post wasnt serious (hence the silly face). It was a good drill. I had nothing serious to add, so I added something silly instead.
     
  5. Yokozuna514

    Yokozuna514 Brown Belt

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    Switch kicks are great and should be practiced regularly, imho. We use drills similarly to the one in the video and find that they are not only useful for the student kicking but also for the student holding the pad. Recognizing the technique is the first step to countering it and and performing it and seeing it performed is the best way to prepare for it during live sparring.
     
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  6. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Sir, that's OK , gave me an opportunity to explain further.
     
  7. Gwai Lo Dan

    Gwai Lo Dan 2nd Black Belt

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    I'm not a fast person, so I have never found the full switch to be effective.

    However, once I started working out at a UFC gym, I was very impressed with the switch kicks the muy thai guys do. I found it to be much quicker.

    Finally I came across actor Scott Adkins comparison of the two (starting at about 1:50). I wish I had a well-rounded instructor like that. It would have saved me the time of finding things out for myself!

     
  8. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    Note 2 things 1. I luv that he addresses pushing the kicking foot off the floor. 2. The Adkins drill above is different for a different purpose. In his drill the kicking sid shoulder remains forward. this also helps disguise that the feet have switched. . In the Drill I posted it is important that the hip and shoulder switch to facilitate either the Back Piercing Kick or rear leg Side turning kick.
    So, it is 2 different things but being able to do both facilitates versatility/
     
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  9. dvcochran

    dvcochran Grandmaster

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    Excellent drill. We do it a little differently using smaller targets and the holder is moving position and changing legs. Takes bit more room but gives a really good dynamic feel to the exercise. It really works on footwork as well.
    To @skribs; if your school does a similar drill do you change target location? ie, body shot vs. head shot?
     
  10. dvcochran

    dvcochran Grandmaster

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    When you say 'recognizing the technique' do you mean when to use X technique? If so I fully agree. A good drill that is Not rote memorization.
     
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  11. granfire

    granfire Sr. Grandmaster

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    (too long on the sidelines, took me a while to get it)

    I can't pull the video up again to watch it again....

    We had the rule that Black Belts coul break the 'below belt' rule under certain circumstances:
    you may kick the leading leg of your opponent with your - oh shucks, I forgot - I think the front leg, but it's been a while.
    We never did drills, but I actually got my instructor with this quick stance change once.
    the drill lacks though (IMO) because he swaps and stands there.
    You swap your stance, you got to swap and kick and not wait a second, or your momentum might be lost.

    so no: this drill is not for the head shot (there are other targets, <gasp> I know)
    it is specifically for a kick like I described,
    Just not very well thought out!

    ETA: watched it again
    I guess the purpose of the drill is to keep the pad holder on his toes)
     
  12. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    The drill is designed so that the target holder adjusts after the first switch is made as an opponent may make a similar adjustment. So, an immediate kick would not allow for this possible target / technique change.
     
  13. dvcochran

    dvcochran Grandmaster

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    This is also a good and useful kick. It is commonly used in TKD sparring and I am sure many other styles. I have often heard it called a 3/4 kick.
    In the cat and mouse of sparring it has a Lot to do with setting up the other person. Sometimes you can do that with foot movement and sometimes it takes shoulder/body movement. The Adkins video made it sound like it is the same kick done Thai style compared to TKD style, which I do not agree with. More of another kick or variation in the tool bag.
    He did not mention it I do not believe but leaving the shoulder forward while stepping/rotating back 'winds the spring' in the torso allowing you to create good power.
    Another variation we use in sparring is essentially the inverse; Fully rotating the shoulders and leaving the hips neutral or forward biased. It can really make an opponent freeze while trying to figure out your next move. If they step in you are in a good position for a front leg kick or to simply shed them and step back and away.
    Thank you Mr. @Earl Weiss ; this has been an informative thread.
     
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  14. granfire

    granfire Sr. Grandmaster

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    right.
    As such the drill is more useful to the pad holder to react to the switch than the kicker.
    In a sparring application, you really have to make the swap and pull the trigger, because if your opponent has any kind of swiftness, they will react quicker to the swap than the pad holder and counter.
    I would have never gotten my instructor had I waited!

    just my opinion though.
     
  15. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    The pad holder already knows what they will do at the switch. They have already picked their one of 3 choices, so there is not much of a reaction other than executing the chosen action. . If the kicker already knows what they will do and does it immediately following the switch they have a one in 3 chance of the possibility of hitting the target.
     
  16. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    IMO that is another drill with another potential.... to somewhat disguise the foot action by keeping the shoulder forward. We call this a cross step.
     
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  17. Earl Weiss

    Earl Weiss Senior Master

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    As an aside, the Warm up for this drill is to do each kick 10 times with each leg without the pad switch It's the switch step with immediate .- Side turning kick, Back Piercing kick, or second switch side Turning kick.123
     

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