New to the Buj

Discussion in 'Ninjutsu' started by xfighter88, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. xfighter88

    xfighter88 Blue Belt

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    I am starting bujinkan today at 3. I am very interested to see how it goes. I come from a TKD, Muay Thai, and BJJ background. So how foreign is it to my previous experience?
     
  2. RoninX

    RoninX Orange Belt

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    Very foreign. And if you are too much into the sports, you probably won´t like it.
     
  3. Chris Parker

    Chris Parker Grandmaster

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    Yeah, this is a very open ended question... how different is chocolate to strawberry or vanilla? How about rocky road?

    Essentially, the physical movements and actions are very different, the emphasis is very different, the approach is very different, the philosophy is very different, the tactics and strategies are very different, so prepare to be lost for a while, and even to feel that your previous training is less valuable (this is a common experience for anyone going from any art to another, with the change in environment the previous approach in other arts will not be as effective in a new art).

    The only way for you to realistically know the difference, though, is to go to the school, and find out. Such things cannot really be quantified.

    I wish you the best with your journey.
     
  4. Almack

    Almack White Belt

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    Yeah, what Chris said. I did lau gar kickboxing, kung fu and JJJ before I joined a Bujinkan Dojo and I can truely say it's completely different. While there are elements of ju-jutsu in there, the principles and the application are completely different.

    In short, I've been a member of the Booj for almost 4 years now (3rd Kyu) and I'm still lost and confused, but it's stangely addictive. For example, after training for about 1 year my other half dragged me out the supermarket/mall as she was so embarassed that I'd been rolling down an isle.

    My advice to you would be go and try it but don't try to judge it after just one class as each class can be completely different.
     
  5. Bruno@MT

    Bruno@MT Senior Master

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    Huge +1.

    It took me quite a while to get used to ichi monji no kamae.
    Even now, the position of my back knee is still not automatically correct if I don't pay attention to it (causing my knee to hurt sometimes).

    Recently I have taken the advice of Manaka Sensei to heart (I obviously never met him. It's something I read in an interview with Mario De Mol). I try to practise kihon 10 minutes every day. For example in my lunch break sometimes, or at home if I am waiting for someone / something.

    By going through the forms several times everyday, I can ingrain the movements that are new, to the point where I don't actually have to think. For ichi monji this is starting to show results. I won't say my form is great, but at least my hand and feet end up where they are supposed to be without needing to think.

    A couple of weeks ago I learned basic kihon from doko no kamae, and I have to do it all over again. The first umpteen times, I would start from doko no kamae, perform 1 form and end up inich monji no kamae, thinking 'hang on, this ain't right :)'

    Anyway yes ninjutsu is radically different from other arts in all major ways. And in the beginning it can be frustrating. I know I had to unlearn some things when I started ninpo.
     
  6. bljohnson

    bljohnson Yellow Belt

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    I trained in Tae kwon do for several years and played with bjj. Bujinkan was extremely different. I had a great instructor and after just one class I realized how real this was compared to my other experiences. I quit everything else and have not regretted it one bit. That was 16 yrs ago and I still love training.
     
  7. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise MT Moderator Staff Member

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    It is very different to what you have previously trained in. However, that does not mean you should not go and experience it and see if you enjoy it!123
     

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