KIAI's - THEIR PLACE IN KATA

Discussion in 'Karate' started by isshinryuronin, Aug 7, 2020.

  1. Buka

    Buka Sr. Grandmaster

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    I believe that any of the founders of any of the styles, especially if they had been warriors, if presented with a more effective way of doing some part of their system, they would test it and change that part. I really can't fathom why they would not. I'll also bet that's exactly what they did when putting their system together.

    As for Kiai, each to his own. I'll use it any way the mood strikes me.
     
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  2. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    My opinion is that nobody of any system understands it exactly like his/her instructor did. So all of us practice according to the best of our understanding, which may change over the years. And yet people teach during this time, while their own understanding and approach was changing.

    One of my instructors would talk about different people within a system, people who had studied under the same teacher, and yet their rendition and practice of the system was markedly different from each other. This was because each person had studied under the same teacher, but during a different era. One studied when the teacher was younger, the other studied when the teacher was older. So what they did, and what they then passed along to their own students, was different.

    I believe that any system changes somewhat with every person who learns it, even with the strongest desires to keep it exactly the same. Welcome to being human. We are not carbon copies of our instructors, even if we try to be. Many people never teach, so their “changes” never get passed along, and die with the individual. Those that do teach, if their “changes” prove to have merit, then they get passed along to the next generation.

    We practice. We get better. Our understanding improves. We change how we practice. Some of us teach. How we teach changes.

    I believe it is impossible for it to be otherwise.

    My Sifu is the best example that I have, and I do my best to internalize and understand the lessons he gives me. But I’ve given up on trying to be exactly like him, or striving for “perfect” or “complete” understanding. I don’t believe they exist. I just practice to the best of my understanding and I put it to work for me.
     
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  3. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    Ah this was fascinating, never heard it expressed like that nor thought of it like that. Makes sense, awesome :)
     
  4. _Simon_

    _Simon_ Senior Master

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    Love it.

    We had something similar in Kyokushin, when we were sparring at a big day seminar session or memorial training, the Branch Chief would hate hearing that "choo choo" or "chshh chshh" noise as we exhale on hitting someone. Said this is Kyokushin not boxing, we should be kiaiing!

    And that if he heard one more "choo" it's 100 pushups. The noise in the room changed dramatically as we started sparring again XD123
     
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