Kenpo Syllabus?

Discussion in 'Kenpo / Kempo - General' started by Mauthos, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. Mauthos

    Mauthos 2nd Black Belt

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    I have just recently started teaching American Kenpo (Less than 1 year) and a few of my students have asked whether there is a written syllabus to accompany their training.

    Now for me the simple answer, without pointing them at websites such as Larry Tatum's, is no. My instructor never gave me one and I have never felt the need for one, until now.

    I can see the benefit of having a folder, for example, that breaks down all forms, sets and techniques into their component parts in a hopefully simple to follow way, but undertaking such a task could be monumental.

    Searching the web I have found the youtube channel that the dedicated Casa de Kenpo guys have set up and thanks to their hard work I can point my students in their direction to at least help them remember techniques etc when practicing at home.

    However, this is not available, as far as I know, in written form. I have found some online clubs that have written a syllabus and although this is useful as a reference, because the language used or the teaching style coming across in the writing is different to my own, I fear this could only lead to confusion among my students.

    Therefore, I am considering writing my own syllabus, explaining the techniques, forms and sets in my language in my teaching style to be able to hand this out to students as and when required, possibly as small bite size chunks relevant to the grade they are training toward.

    My question after all that preamble waffle is simple:

    Has anyone done this themselves and is it a huge difficult undertaking as I assume it may be?

    Thanks to anyone in advance that can provide me with some insight/advice regarding this.

    Regards.
     
  2. Monkey Turned Wolf

    Monkey Turned Wolf MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I seem to remember seeing something similar on here around february (it may have been from earlier, but thats when i saw it) where someone was in the middle of doing that exact thing. It was a different style of kempo then i study, so i wasn't too interested in it, especially since i already have a handbook with all the techniques, but if he ever finished it, maybe its what your looking for? (If it's even the same style you study) As I said, it was a different style, so i don't have the name of the website anywhere, but if i find it I'll let you know.
    Edit: I don't see it on here where i thought i did, so i probably saw it on a different forum somewhere, I'll look, but wouldn't get your hopes up :/ sorry.
     
  3. Monkey Turned Wolf

    Monkey Turned Wolf MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Found the thread on martialartsplanet.com
    It's actually a shaolin kempo one (which means it is my style...hmmm....wonder why i didnt care too much about it then...OH THATS RIGHT i prefer instructors over online, how silly and archaic of me :duh:) but I'm going to link it anyway, to at least help with a format to create the syllabus/archive if you create an online one.
    http://home.comcast.net/~matthewabarnes/page0/page0.html
     
  4. John Bishop

    John Bishop Master Black Belt

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    In Kajukenbo, we require the students to keep a permanent notebook. They are required to write down the techniques they have learned, and keep notes and handouts in the notebook. Normally, the notebooks are turned in to the instructor for review before testing, and returned after the test.
    The notebooks are a good learning tool for the students, since they have to remember and write down the techniques. It also makes reference easier, since the technique is written in the students own words. And it's a permanent record and memoir for the students as the years go by.
     
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  5. EddieCyrax

    EddieCyrax Blue Belt

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    I keep a journal containing all my learned techniques. It allows me to visualize/internalize the material between training periods. I am not sure I would want someone to do this for me as it is in my own words with my own sketches.

    Many of the techniques are difficult to articulate in words. It allows me to truly disect the techniques. It has also give rise to various questions that I then take to my instructors for clarification.

    This obviously does not take presidence over my live training with instructors and other students. It is something I do on my own.
     
  6. Gentle Fist

    Gentle Fist Master Black Belt

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    I have done the same for my kenpo training over the years as well. Up through 2nd Dan in the style of NCK.
     
  7. Mauthos

    Mauthos 2nd Black Belt

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    Thanks guys,

    Pretty much what I was thinking and the idea about getting my students to write their own notes or create their own syllabus is a great one as I am sure the way I write a technique will be different to the way they would write it down.

    Thanks again for the advice. :)
     
  8. punisher73

    punisher73 Senior Master

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    If you were trying to learn the system then I agree, but I also think it is a good learning tool for students that have already been shown the techniques in person to remember them and train at home in between classes.
     
  9. Doc

    Doc Senior Master

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    I suggest you contact Rich Hale, who has the most comprehensive workbook of the Kenpo Karate System in great detail on computer disc. richhale@pacifickenpo.com
     
  10. Martialartsfan14780

    Martialartsfan14780 White Belt

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    That is a great idea. Having a notebook in student's own words would be great practically and sentimentally, especially for the obscure techniques.
     
  11. Twin Fist

    Twin Fist Grandmaster

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    Second Doc's comment, Mr Hales work is, IMO, THE reference book on Ed parker's American Kenpo
     
  12. celtic_crippler

    celtic_crippler Senior Master

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    KenpoTalk, a sister site of this one, also has an extensive resource center.

    The syllabus I use was created from my years of note-taking; however, so I second those that push for student's taking notes.
     
  13. Uncle

    Uncle Blue Belt

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    I'm in a similar boat for wing chun. There are so many little different drills and variations on the drills that my sifu teaches that it would be insane to compile them all. Also because some students are ready to learn certain things earlier, or some need certain drills to improve their coordination and some don't it would be difficult to draw up a standard syllabus. Just keep in mind that martial arts was transmitted without writing for thousands of years and it did fine.
     
  14. celtic_crippler

    celtic_crippler Senior Master

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    One of the many things SGM Parker is famous for is codifiying the "art", creating a common language so that it could be easily passed down, and applying scientific principles to it. A syllabus containing this information is very common in American Kenpo. It makes it easy for practicioners to share knowledge. Because everyone has a different perspective all "Kenpo" schools are not the same, but when we train with one another we have no problem communicating new information. There's a saying that "kenpo is 50% mental" and by encouraging students to take notes it engages their minds. SGM Parker felt strongly that studying Kenpo was no different than studying any other subject and, much like a college course, required a written format and terminology. That may be hard to understand for someone outside our system.123
     

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