Kajukenbo question

Discussion in 'Kajukenbo' started by Xue Sheng, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. Xue Sheng

    Xue Sheng All weight is underside

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    During my down time from training I have been search around my area (applying my vast skill at Googlefu/Webfu) and I came across a Kajukenbo school.

    Let me make it clear that I have no intension of attending the school, but I am curious about the style. I have always thought of it as being pretty much the same as Kenpo, but I will admit I truly do not know that. It was an assumption on my part.

    we use to have several Kajukenbo folks on MT, but they are long since gone. Hopefully there is someone here these days that can answer my questions

    I have a few questions about Kajukenbo.

    Is it similar to Kenpo?

    Does it have forms?

    If so, how many forms?

    What makes Kajukenbo, Kajukenbo?
     
  2. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    It's a hybrid Martial Art of Hawaii. It is similar to Kenpo in the same way that any striking art is similar to another striking art. Personally, I've always found it somewhat similar to American Karate - which is a hybrid Martial Art.

    It looks like this.....kinda. I'm sure it's morphed since this video was shot ten years ago.



    Used to work with a Kajukenbo guy, but he retired a couple years ago. He was Chuck Norris's bodyguard when Chuck came to Hawaii over a span of thirty years. He and Chuck used to work out together all the time....in Kajukenbo.

    It used to have forms, don't know if it still does. I don't know how many. Kajukenbo guys always told me "It's all about fighting". I always liked that .
     
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  3. Blindside

    Blindside Senior Master

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    A bit of background, I started my adult martial arts experience in Kaju, transitioned to Kenpo and then continued to work regularly with different Kaju lineages.

    Is it similar to Kenpo?
    - Yes, there are four main lineages of Kajukenbo, the first/original was Kajukenbo-Kenpo and Kenpo was used as the framework around which they integrated everything else. Tons of overlaps in the self-defense "tricks" as compared to the Kenpo variety that I did. It comes across as a harder style than say American kenpo, but they are clearly family. The other lineages are a bit different, they are intentionally flavored by different mixes of kung-fu and this impacts their appearance and feel. The Kajukenbo-Chuan-fa branch that I worked with had similar "tricks" to what I saw in Kenpo. I don't know much about the Won Hop Kuen Do and Tum Pai lineages.

    Does it have forms?
    -Yes, Kajukenbo-Kenpo had 14 short forms, the Chuan-Fa branch retained those as "Monkey Sets" and I believe had some additional. As far as I know both WHKD and Tum Pai have their own as well, but I don't know how many.

    What makes Kajukenbo, Kajukenbo?
    Lineage and philosophy. Kaju is interesting as an eclectic art it doesn't try to traditionalize its mix. It developed those four main lineages that I mentioned and then there is a system in place for senior instructors to develop their own method within the system. So you might have Kakukenbo-Chuan Fa (lineage), Smith Method. So Kaju is a hybrid swarm rather than a family tree. Speaking of, this is it: Site Builder

    Speaking of family trees, what holds the idea of Kaju together is their heavily emphasized Ohana, they recognize their differences but know that they are all family even if they may disagree about how and why their particular branch might do something.

    Hope that helps,
     
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  4. punisher73

    punisher73 Senior Master

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    Both had their roots in Prof. Chow's kenpo. Sijo Emperado (one of the five founders) was a student of Prof. Chow. Ed Parker, was a student of Prof. Chow and also spent a short time training with Emperado as well.

    Ka-Karate
    Ju-Judo/Jujitsu
    Ken-Kenpo
    Bo-Boxing/Chinese Boxing

    Each founder brought a piece of what they knew and they crossed trained and came up with answers to the pieces parts of self-defense and incoporated everything into one style, essentially the first systematized MMA in modern times. There are punch counters, knife/club counters, mass attack counters and the "forms" were called "Palamas" in honor of the settlement it was created it.

    Sijo Emperado's branch maintained the heavy kenpo emphasis. Other branches went into the more kung fu branch, like Tum Pai. Prof. John Bishop has a couple of really good books out on Kajukenbo and its history.
     
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