Is taekwondo good

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by tkdislife, Feb 19, 2016.

  1. tkdislife

    tkdislife White Belt

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    i am currently 1 year and a half away from black belt but im wondering once i reach it should i continue or look for other martial arts to learn
     
  2. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    Black belt means you know approximately nothing in terms of mastery. Do you want to be good at one thing, or suck at many things?
     
  3. tkdislife

    tkdislife White Belt

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    i didnt mean it like that i meant is it a good martial art for real life situation or even just to know
     
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  4. Ironbear24

    Ironbear24 Senior Master

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    It concerns me that you know the time you will get it. Are the students guaranteed one after a set amount of time?
    If you have been practicing it for a long time, You should know it is as good as the individual using it.
     
  5. tkdislife

    tkdislife White Belt

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    that is the on average time from my current belt
     
  6. Bill Mattocks

    Bill Mattocks Sr. Grandmaster

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    It can be. Much depends on you, and on the quality of the instruction you receive.

    Honestly however, you should know this at your stage of training.
     
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  7. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    And what is your current belt?

    TKD is like any other MA. What you get out of it will depend on how much you put into it, and exactly what you're being taught. Some schools focus heavily on the sport side of TKD. These schools are probably generally not as effective at teaching you to use your skills in a defensive application. But there are exceptions. And no matter what is being taught, if you don't put in the effort, or if you don't understand how to properly apply the techniques, then it won't be effective.
     
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  8. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    What is your purpose and goals for training? Is the training you are getting meeting or working to meet those goals?
    Are you learning or being taught how to applying what you are learning and practicing in a realistic manner?
     
  9. AIKIKENJITSU

    AIKIKENJITSU Yellow Belt

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    After you're black belt, try American Kenpo. I've studied it for forty years and I'm still learning. If you do, get into if you can, the more advanced American Kenpo school, meaning good ones have added Philippine knife and stick fighting. Some have added jujitsu which I don't agree with. Over the years I have developed ground techniques that is not jujitsu, but does get you off the ground and back on your feet. One of the things I like about Kenpo is that we have "standing ground techniques also." This means once you get the guy on the ground we have strikes, kicks, landing knees and elbows and locking up arms and legs to twist or stomp on them. All this is accomplished while you are standing and the bad guy is on the ground. Many Kenpo schools teach double stick technique, that were developed by Ed Parker. Mainly empty hand techniques were modified for double sticks.
    I'm a small guy 5'2" and I've handled attacks from big guys. Kenpo depends alot on fast maultiple hand strikes and low kicks and body motion. Good luck!
     
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  10. Balrog

    Balrog Master of Arts

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    Well, consider this. Making First Degree Black Belt is like graduating from high school. You've learned the basics and have a foundation. It's now time to start learning the art and that takes a lifetime.
     
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  11. tkdislife

    tkdislife White Belt

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    well im a blackstripe but it there are different belts per club
     
  12. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    So you've given an answer that is meaningless outside your school. Awesome.

    Taekwondo typically has 10 geup ranks, regardless of the colors used on belts.

    Perhaps you could given an informative answer?

    Or not. It was just curiosity. The real answer remains the same. Tae Kwon Do, like any martial art, is as good as the student and instructor. No better. No worse.


    Sent from an old fashioned 300 baud acoustic modem by whistling into the handset. Not TapaTalk. Really.
     
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  13. JowGaWolf

    JowGaWolf Grandmaster

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    If you are asking this question when you are 1 belt away from a black belt then I think you already know the answer to it. I knew after 2 weeks that what I was learning would be useful in self-defense. It only took about 4 demos for me to fully understand. The first demo I threw a weak punch and was told throw a better one so that my Sifu could demonstrate the technique properly. So I did and paid the price. The 2nd and 3rd time I was the demo boy, I thought I could throw a punch harder or a kick harder to beat the defenses. By the 3rd demo I understood that the harder I throw the punch or kick, the worse it'll hurt. By the 4th demo I dreaded being the "demo boy." Any doubts that I had about my system were gone by week 4. It wasn't just the demo's that make it clear, it was the training, the conditioning, and how the practical and logical the applications were.

    If you are just now asking this question at this stage then most likely your school wasn't focused on self-defense as much. Maybe your school's training was geared towards point sparring?
     
  14. geezer

    geezer Grandmaster

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    Follow through on the commitment to get that black belt, and be the best you can be at that level. When you are there, you should know if TKD is an art that you want to continue in, or if you would rather experience something else. There are many other fascinating and worthy martial arts you could choose to study. No one else, especially on this forum can tell you which path to choose. It's your life, pick a path that suits you and follow it with commitment.
     
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  15. Touch Of Death

    Touch Of Death Sr. Grandmaster

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    Bite your tongue!
     
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  16. Anyan

    Anyan Orange Belt

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    show your`s video - taekwondo not for anybody, but hadly for peaple with enought long legs ))
     
  17. SahBumNimRush

    SahBumNimRush Master of Arts

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    As mentioned by others above, there are a few variables that affect the results of your training, i.e. the particular school's curriculum, the instructor, the student, etc.

    With that being said, in my 30 years of experience in the art, I continue to grow and learn everyday. We have had many students go on to LEO and military service and more than a few civilian students who have had to call upon their training in self-defense situations (all of whom successfully handled their particular situations).

    My opinion/experience FWIW.
     
  18. donald1

    donald1 Senior Master

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    I dont know anything about TKD but i do know like any legitimate style it all depends on the practitioner; is he/she good?
     
  19. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes MT Moderator Staff Member

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    Good for what?

    As a form of exercise to keep you active, burn calories, and improve your cardio and coordination? Definitely!

    As a competitive sport? If you enjoy it, then yes!

    As a fun social activity? If you enjoy it, then yes!

    As a method of developing fighting skill which might be helpful if you ever have to defend yourself in a physical confrontation? Depends a great deal on how your instructor teaches the art and how you train. I've seen schools that I think do a very poor job for this purpose and others that seem to be much better. Either way, it's probably better than sitting at home playing video games.

    I don't know that there's anything special about black belt that would make it a preferable stopping point if you decide to move on to another art. 1st degree black belt is a relatively low rank in most TKD schools, indicating a grasp of the basics but not much more. If you are wanting to continue with TKD, there's plenty to learn past that point.

    The real questions to ask yourself are
    a) is my TKD training giving me something that I value (fun, exercise, fighting skill, whatever)?
    b) is there other training available to me that I would value more?

    If the answer to a is "no", then it's time to quit TKD. If the answer to b is "yes", it's time to start that other training.

    You should be able to answer a right now based on your current experience with training. You'll only be able to answer b by looking around at the other martial arts available in your area and seeing what those schools have to offer.
     
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  20. Andrew Green

    Andrew Green Grandmaster

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    Why? If he said he was a year away from getting a MD would you question how he knows the time frame? Surely a MD is given with a lot more care and requirements then a Tae Kwon Do black belt...123
     

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