How much time does a typical Hapkido class devote to kicking compared to TKD?

Discussion in 'Hapkido' started by Axiom, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes Senior Master

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    Hmm ... so the heart plexus is an internal structure protected by the rib cage? Not so likely to produce a lethal result via an unarmed strike in that case. That would be a legal target not only in MMA, but most full contact striking competition - including boxing. Muay Thai, Kyokushin Karate, etc. I don't think I can recall a single fatality due to a strike to that location.

    The brachial plexus is a different spot and a much better target for striking. It's unlikely to have lethal results, but it can produce knockouts. Some combat sports allow strikes to the brachial plexus while others do not. MMA allows it.
     
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  2. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    Well, I will admit I have never struck anyone at the heart plexus, but I have trained it in short stick training. But along with the notch strike, I was told it was very likely to put a person down, and possibly kill them.

    I agree the brachial plexus is also likely to put a person down, but I have never done so.
     
  3. Tony Dismukes

    Tony Dismukes Senior Master

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    Where exactly is the external location you were taught to strike that would supposedly affect the heart plexus?

    Are you sure you're not talking about the solar plexus? That's a good striking target, though unlikely to cause fatality.
     
  4. oftheherd1

    oftheherd1 Senior Master

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    It is a little difficult for me to describe. It is to the left of the centerline and above the breast/nipple. I think you just need to learn and adjust for different people. For me it wasn't so difficult to figure where it was as I have some knowledge of human anatomy.

    No, I am not confusing it with the solar plexus, and I agree it is not likely to cause death, but it can. In Korea a KATUSA was kicked by another KATUSA who had his boots on. The Xiphoid process was broken and forced into the heart, killing that KATUSA.
     
  5. Raymond

    Raymond Orange Belt

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    I'll let you know once I find out what the typical HKD class is :)

    The answer will vary based on the curriculum of the school, its organization, its lineage, etc etc
     
  6. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    You mean TKD, right? TKD I can tell you - bare minimum 50% training in kicking.
     
  7. Dirty Dog

    Dirty Dog MT Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Really? And you know this based on your vast experience in one school?

    Generalizing from inadequate experience is unwise. Especially about something as widespread and varied as TKD.

    The only realistic answer is that it depends on the curriculum of the individual school and the preferences of the instructor(s). And the day of the week, even.
     
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  8. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    Come on bro, a TaeKwonDo school that devotes less than 50% of it's time to kicking overall? I'd say my statement is very safe to make even without empirical evidence to support it.
     
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  9. elder999

    elder999 El Oso de Dios!

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    Yeah, you'd be wrong.....again.:rolleyes:
     
  10. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    LOL? How can I write out obscure in enough adjectives?
     
  11. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    "Of course we balance up by practicing more kicking"

    /Your source.
     
  12. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    How is having 80% hands in the poomsae curriculum obscure?

    Even if that statement isn't true, your statement was "TKD I can tell you - bare minimum 50% training in kicking." Those people you're considering obscure are evidence that's not always true.
     
  13. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    That's normal. It doesn't tell us anything about the distributed training because pattern is only one part of TKD training. But the other quote was kinda of hinting that some schools might very well spend more than 50% on hand techniques.
     
  14. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple Senior Master

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    Ah, ok. I would agree based on my own experience that what they practice is not mostly hand techniques. But I would assume that if the patterns teach that much more hand techniques than kicking techniques, they should be? Where was the disconnect there from poomsae/pattern to practice?
     
  15. Gnarlie

    Gnarlie Master of Arts

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    By "we", I mean my class, not TKD as a whole.

    Failure to recognise the link between form and function lies with the individual.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
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  16. elder999

    elder999 El Oso de Dios!

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  17. gpseymour

    gpseymour Grandmaster

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    Where did he say it didn't depend for the Judo schools?
     
  18. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    Yeah and he quoted YOU
     
  19. Axiom

    Axiom Black Belt

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    No because of what I just wrote. TKD instructors do take into account the fact that forms are very hand oriented and to make the art distinctly Korean then spend a majority (not all) of other drills with kicks. This is how it should be as well IMO
     
  20. Raymond

    Raymond Orange Belt

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    No I mean HKD. The thread title starts with the phrase "how much time does a typical hapkido class . . .". The point of my post is that Hapkido is such a widely varied art with lots of orgs and independent dojangs, it is impossible to call any class "typical".

    Hapkido has joint locks, throws, take down, hand strikes, kicks etc. Even the kicks between organizations will be different. When you have so many things in the art, with so many ways to do it, there is no typical. Broad generalizations are impossible to make so I don't even think its worth debating.
     
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