Do maiming and killing only work in SD?

Discussion in 'Security and Bouncers' started by Joab, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. JP3

    JP3 Master Black Belt

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    I can understand that. Thai leg-kicked a guy one time and I was zigging when he was zagging apparently and it blew out his knee. Super-creepy, indeed. Later on in the debrief we sort of collectively figured out he was trying to switch up his feet and ended up putting his full weight on it right as the kick came dropping in.

    In thinking about @CB Jones comment about things getting broken... there was that tread a while back about the doorman who hit a guy who swung on him, guy fell, either offbalanced or knocked out -- it was unclear from the write-up, the guy fell and cracked his skull when he hit the curb. Environmental after-effects of techniques can be worse than the techniques themselves.

    I've dropped guys using foot sweeps, floating hip throws which sort of got put together on the spot, etc., but I'm easing them down tot he ground. Probably good for them as most clubs have stone or tile floor to make clean up easier.... Can you imagine really blasting into one of the big throws and throwing the guy "through the mat" like we do in competition? Sheesh...
     
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  2. Gaucho

    Gaucho Yellow Belt

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    [QUOTE="JP3, post: 1967303, member: 34310" Can you imagine really blasting into one of the big throws and throwing the guy "through the mat" like we do in competition? Sheesh...[/QUOTE]

    Thus the difference between sport judo and combat ju-jitsu. In the latter, you just release the guy at the end of the throw and let him hit the ground at 30 (or whatever) miles per hour. It's usually much more harmful than a hard punch. I personally know of one death and one permanent disability caused by soldier/ex-soldier (2 separate cases) using marines' combat ju-jitsu. Both were found "not-guilty," and demonstrate the possible peril of getting boozed and trying to punch a stranger in the face.

    Turning judo into something deadly requires very little alteration. People don't usually bounce well.
     
  3. Buka

    Buka Grandmaster

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    Any time I've taken someone down someone for real I've always tried to ease them to the ground. Unless I have them in such a way that I'm controlling their head - then I may whip their legs down really hard.

    In competitions I used to always try to take them down as harmlessly as possible. I never had any desire to hurt someone I was competing against. Unless, you know, they went all World war 3 on me or something.
     
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  4. JP3

    JP3 Master Black Belt

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    I think that'd be better said as, "People don't usually survive a bounce well." I hear ya though. We've got good threads on here talking about the positives v. negatives of judo as a self-defense.... I'll say skill, not system. Lots of good thoughts on it. Personally, I like it as it works for me. But, I'm just a guy who goes to nightclubs, bars and restaraunts with a pretty wife, not in LEO, so... I'm not qualified to speak on that level of need of efficacy. Judo can be simple to teach and simple to learn (note I didn't say "easy), you can get kids involved in it as an organized sport/activity at very young ages, and you can continue to play/practice (you pick the word you like, I prefer play, myself), well into their elder years. I've laid hands on a 7th dan in his late 80s... and it was a very good time. So smooth...123
     

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