Cross-Training Kung Fu and other arts

Discussion in 'General Martial Arts Talk' started by j.ouellet23, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. j.ouellet23

    j.ouellet23 White Belt

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    Anyone have any thoughts and experience with cross-training different disciplines.

    Where I am living in Urumqi, China, there is alot of BJJ, Taekwondo, and some Wing Chun.

    Do people see benefits/drawbacks to practicing something like Kung Fu and another martial art?

    Just curious[​IMG]
     
  2. kempodisciple

    kempodisciple MT Moderator Staff Member

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    What style of kung fu?/have you asked your instructor about it?

    Personally I think practicing multiple styles at once is fine, if they focus on separate things. IE: I wouldn't practiced TKD and kickboxing at the same time, but I might practiced hung gar and shuai jiao together.
     
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  3. Rat

    Rat 3rd Black Belt

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    Not a martial arts style but (and plenty of people could back me up ) Yoga goes well with pretty much any martial art.



    and just above, if you do a striking stylem find a grappling one to cross train in and vice versa. Or find a good training system to do with it. (if you could only do 2 things, and not 2 styles and a program)
     
  4. j.ouellet23

    j.ouellet23 White Belt

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    I haven't spoken to my instructors.
    I mainly practice Xingyiquan, Taijiquan, Shaolinquan, and I have tried Wing Chun and Sanda.

    I'm more curious from a theory/practical sense. Since there are so many different styles.
     
  5. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    That's a lot of different stuff already. How long have you been training?
     
  6. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

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    Cross-training as a beginner isn't that good of an idea. You're already getting information overload from one art. Typically, as a beginner, you'll learn a lot of rigid fundamentals, many of which would conflict by cross-training.

    Once you're grounded in the art and have good fundamentals, then cross-training becomes a blessing.
     
  7. j.ouellet23

    j.ouellet23 White Belt

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    Iv been studying kung fu for about 3 years, I am still a beginner I admit.
    Im not asking this question because I plan on adding more styles right now, but I want to understand the martial arts on a deeper level. I want to see how they connect and can benefit each other.

    Why do you see it as a blessing?
     
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  8. skribs

    skribs Senior Master

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    Every art has gaps in it. Things you train that are done better by other arts, or at least focused on more in other arts, or else things that you don't train at all. Cross-training fills those gaps.
     
  9. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    Cross training? Or, just training? People play different sports
    I have students who train in Wing Chun, Kali, Muay Thai, and either submission wrestling or BJJ from the beginning of their training. Within 2 years they are quite good at being able to use them separately or can blend them. Good body mechanics are good body mechanics. It's about learning what is applicable and when is it applicable for you.
     
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  10. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    You've taken on a lot in 3 years. You refer to "kung fu" as if it were one thing, but you're actually studying multiples systems already.

    The real benefit - in the long term - to studying multiple systems is learning not to be constrained by a system, but to use it as a foundation. Often in a system, we're told "this is wrong". But often, it's just wrong in that system or context. When you find a system that shows you how to use that thing properly, it ceases to be "wrong" (though it still may not fit within the confines of a given system).

    This ability to step beyond the bounds of a system gives you more options, and often leads to a better understanding of your main system (including a better understanding of why that thing was "wrong" to start with).
     
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  11. Martial D

    Martial D Senior Master

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    Cross training BJJ with a TMA is a good idea if your focus is on the martial part. I have a WC background but also do BJJ.

    Most styles(traditional and non) ignore the ground aspect which leaves a giant hole.
     
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  12. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    You will have problem trying to cross train northern CMA and southern CMA at the same time.
     
  13. drop bear

    drop bear Sr. Grandmaster

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    Kids can learn 10.different languages. Or a dozen different dance disciplines, play cricket soccer and football all at the same time and manage fine.

    I think the idea you can only cope with one martial art at a time is selling people short.
     
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  14. gpseymour

    gpseymour MT Moderator Staff Member

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    I think some of it comes down to how MA instructors teach. Some are better for cross-training, I think.
     
  15. dvcochran

    dvcochran Senior Master

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    If you look at traditional TKD there are several similarities with Kung Fu in regards to motion. Traditional would be something like Moo Duk Kwan or ITF, not WT.
    I cannot speak to it's relationship with BJJ.

    As far as cross training being a blessing/benefit, there are many. Cross training will greatly expand your concepts and techniques and will teach you different approaches, usage and ideology of them. Getting training from different perspectives is a very eye opening experience. Assuming the instruction is of good quality.
     
  16. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Have you ever seen any Taiji guy ever use hip throw? I believe it's from cross training.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. Flying Crane

    Flying Crane Sr. Grandmaster

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    I think a big mistake that a lot of people make is to train in several systems, thinking that they can do everything. The truth is, nobody can do everything, certainly not with a high level of quality to it all.

    time is short, we can only do so much while maintaining high quality, before we become spread too thin. As Bilbo says, "i feel like butter spread over too much toast."

    Training in several systems is a good idea in my opinion, for a while. But ultimately that experience should direct you to the one or (possibly) two systems that really speaks to you and is a good match for you. Not every system is a good match for every person. We all need to decide what is the best for ourselves, and pursue that. That is how we all should spend our time.

    That broad experience is still useful in the long run as it gives a a wider sense of what else is out there. But our own skills are best developed if we don't spread ourselves too thin. Consistency and repetition are key to improving skills. Trying to do too many things leads to inconsistency, and not enough repetition.

    That's my two cents, anyways.
     
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  18. j.ouellet23

    j.ouellet23 White Belt

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    Alot of it has come from my training being "in a park" with an instructor, which has ended in exposure to several styles at once. Even when I went to do my Duanwei test, it happened to be at a formal Wing chun school, even though I was testing for Xingyiquan. This lead me to be exposed to the art because there were some kids testing for their Wing Chun levels, and I was curious about it.

    Could issues with cross training also be caused by perceptions of a "school" being a singular entity? Example on one street you might have a karate school, a couple buildings down a TKD school. Because of how they are structured they may never interact. Here in China, you can go to a park and see 3 or 4 different styles in a small area, sometimes they interact and share just because they can.
     
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  19. Danny T

    Danny T Senior Master

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    It comes down to what is the emphasis of the individual. I have those who want to learn a martial art/system... just don't know and most don't care which one, just interested in learning something. Many not really interesting in fighting but having that ability is a great byproduct. It's more they want to someone to keep them motivated to be physically and mentally challenged. I recommend they train in several for a few months to see which they like the best or best suits their wants & needs then focus on that one. Others come for training in a specific system so that's what they train while others just want to learn how to physically defend themselves using whatever it takes. With these it's more about using whatever the systems have that can be integrated cohesively and efficiently. Some of these are LEOs or military personnel who are looking for skills and attributes that can be used in a short time of training versus months of development. I teach individuals using a multitude of systems depending on their needs. Give your clients what they need. If you can't provide what they need then recommend someone who can. If someone wants to just learn 1 system...great. If they want to be able to physically use the training is some effective manner in a couple of weeks or even on the streets tomorrow...the training is going to be different than the one wanting to learn a system.
     
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  20. Kung Fu Wang

    Kung Fu Wang Grandmaster

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    Instead of looking at MA from the cross training point of view, you can also look at MA from the toolbox point of view,

    Do you have the following tools in your toolbox? If you don't, do you know where to get it?

    - jab, cross, uppercut, hook, hammer fist, back fist, side punch, ...
    - front kick, side kick, roundhouse kick, hook kick, flying knee, ...
    - finger lock, wrist lock, elbow lock, shoulder lock, head lock, ankle lock, ...
    - hip throw, foot sweep, leg twist, leg lift, leg block, ...
    - full mount, side mount, arm bar, leg bar, ...

    If you just want to add flying knee into your toolbox, you don't need to learn the complete MT system.123
     
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